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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
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    Gettysburg, PA
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    2,624

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    I used to show in obedience & conformation, but have gotten away from it. As someone already said, Best in Show isn't that far from the truth It can be more of who you know or who is on the end of the leash more than what caliber dog you have. It also can be a lot of fun and it is a wonderful feeling when you dog gets best of breed and group placings - I never got Best in show, but I'm sure I would be super excited. I preferred obedience as I felt it was more "honest" and felt I achieved more and a closr bond with the dog.

    I breed occassionally, but like horses it can be heartbreaking. I've also been through several c-sections. A litter is a lot of work - constant cleaning and changing bedding. If you have a large breed, you must also be prepared for a large litter. And if that is beyond what Mom can care for, you have to step in. The largest I've seen in my breed is 17 live (1 dead). Luckily she is a vet tech and they came to work and everyone helped feed.
    Epona Farm
    Irish Draughts and Irish Sport horses

    Join us on Facebook



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,723

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    The BYB craze is really getting out of hand lately. I have several clients that I let "have it" on a regular basis. People who buy 2 random dogs of the same breed, usually with GLARING defects like bite problems, demodex, etc. Others that have no defects but are poor representatives of their breed (too big, off color, etc.). Ugh.

    My whippet came from a very reputable breeder. She tests out the wazoo, shows, small # litters, etc. He was left intact when I got him (he had his bench championship) in case she wanted to breed him down the road. It never happened 3 years later, so I finally neutered him a few months back. In all my years of work, I have had only ONE client reach out to me to find out what steps they would need to take to breed their dog responsibly. I don't know much about Mastiffs for type, but he's a NICE dog. I gave them the OFA, CERF, brucellosis, etc. info and they didn't batt an eye. They are going to have the dog evaluated by some breeder in another state to make sure he's even type-y enough. Sadly, they aren't going to show him, so I don't know how successful they will be finding a reputable person with a bitch to stand him to...
    From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Posts
    2,633

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    OH MY GOSH YOU EVIL BREEDER PERSON


    sorry, that kind of day, had to get it off my chest.

    There are a few who breed and show, somebody has the most adorable Cavalier King Charles spaniels. Sannois?

    I am considering to look at getting another Dalmatian...any leads?

    That would be Sonesta...except I have a couple of adorable Cavaliers she bred, so it could be me. I show them, and it's a strangely addictive hobby. It's expensive to show, but I haven't found it to be nearly as expensive as horses.

    I have yet to breed. Don't ask me how much I spent on the testing and the showing, etc. in preparation for maybe breeding (maybe someday). I might weep.
    Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,481

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    Quote Originally Posted by Emryss View Post
    That would be Sonesta...except I have a couple of adorable Cavaliers she bred, so it could be me. I show them, and it's a strangely addictive hobby. It's expensive to show, but I haven't found it to be nearly as expensive as horses.

    I have yet to breed. Don't ask me how much I spent on the testing and the showing, etc. in preparation for maybe breeding (maybe someday). I might weep.
    was something with S...I do apologize

    Was yours the barn dog with the velcro'd ears?

    http://img850.imageshack.us/img850/1...3565642191.jpg

    It was mg....
    (there is a WHOLE conversation in that one look....poor baby!)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,840

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    We just sent Gale to be with a handler for some shows. We breed Pembroke Welsh Corgis and GSP's. All health and performance tested before breeding. As others have said it can be very rewarding but it is a labor of love.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Posts
    2,633

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    was something with S...I do apologize

    Was yours the barn dog with the velcro'd ears?

    http://img850.imageshack.us/img850/1...3565642191.jpg

    It was mg....
    (there is a WHOLE conversation in that one look....poor baby!)
    Oh, my! No, that is not my dog, but what a mess!

    These are my dogs:

    Willie
    Patty

    I also have Star with my nephew, but no pictures of her online any more - my photo hosting site shut down aqnd I haven't taken any new ones lately.
    Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,481

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    Quote Originally Posted by Emryss View Post
    Oh, my! No, that is not my dog, but what a mess!

    These are my dogs:

    Willie
    Patty

    I also have Star with my nephew, but no pictures of her online any more - my photo hosting site shut down aqnd I haven't taken any new ones lately.
    well, you FB links don't work ^_^
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    400

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    Proud breeder here! We breed once (maybe twice) a year. Just bred a bitch last week, so fingers crossed. Showing and breeding really is a full time commitment, and it takes a lot of time, dedication, and money to do it right. But, it is intensely rewarding. In the fourth litter we ever bred, we bred a national specialty/group winning dog. There is nothing more rewarding than planning for, whelping, raising, and training a dog that has that kind of success. There are times that the dog showing (and dog people) make me want to bang my head against, but it is a labor of love and frustration. Our litters are spoken for way before they are born, so we have the luck of being able to pick and choose who we want to have our puppies....and we are very particular. We take our jobs as breeders very seriously, and one of our most important jobs is educating the public about our breed. Our doggies - www.faireviewborderterriers.com



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    16,399

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    I buy dogs from an established breeder who tests her stock, both in the ring and at the vet, and is widely considered one of the top people in the breed in this country, but I have not bred my own. I think I would have too hard of a time letting the puppies go, and then I would have 14 dogs.

    But I do believe in supporting people who produce very good dogs!



  10. #30
    Join Date
    May. 14, 2004
    Posts
    87

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    I have a stud border collie. He has never been in the conformation ring but excels at flyball & tried hard with agility. He has his hips & elbows clears & he is CEA negative by DNA. His breeder wanted to use him with one of her bitches that was confirmed in standing heat & he just thought we brought him a new playmate. He had no idea what to do....
    Any ideas?? We have had the suggestion to test his testerone levels. He also lives with a very dominate female so maybe going to live with the bitch in heat might help.
    COTH ate my old ID. Not that anyone knew it anyways...

    Member of the Chicken Jumper Clique.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,770

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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    Part of the fun of showing dogs (in my opinion) is the breed club events - our local club sponsors other events besides conformation shows.
    Goodness, not in my breed. The thought of all of them in one place gives me the willies.
    I'm trying to decide if I want to get back into things or not. If I end up buying one of the show puppies born 4 days ago, then I will pull on my thick-skin coat and go back to the ring. In a few years I might think about breeding her if she's all that and a bag of chips. My old guy got prostatis and had to be neutered, but I never bred him and he was already a veteran by the time he lost his two best friends. I regret not breeding him because his line is very nice and he's just a super dog.
    You are what you dare.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Posts
    2,633

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    well, you FB links don't work ^_^
    Bugger. Got myself on privacy lockdown and forgot about that...

    This is woefully out of date and I really should fix it, but here: http://gramercycavaliers.com/index.html
    Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,770

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    Quote Originally Posted by Go Jump View Post
    I have a stud border collie. He has never been in the conformation ring but excels at flyball & tried hard with agility. He has his hips & elbows clears & he is CEA negative by DNA. His breeder wanted to use him with one of her bitches that was confirmed in standing heat & he just thought we brought him a new playmate. He had no idea what to do....
    Any ideas?? We have had the suggestion to test his testerone levels. He also lives with a very dominate female so maybe going to live with the bitch in heat might help.
    Sometimes it takes a awhile for them to figure things out. One of my friend's dogs was a little slow in this regard. She said he kept trying to breed her head.
    You are what you dare.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,538

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    Quote Originally Posted by Go Jump View Post
    His breeder wanted to use him with one of her bitches that was confirmed in standing heat & he just thought we brought him a new playmate. He had no idea what to do....
    Any ideas?? We have had the suggestion to test his testerone levels. He also lives with a very dominate female so maybe going to live with the bitch in heat might help.
    Unfortunatley there might not be much you can do. He might be related to my ex-husband, and there seemed to be no cure....


    5 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,840

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    It may be easiest to collect him and then inseminate the hitch.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2000
    Location
    Full time in Delhi, NY!
    Posts
    6,394

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    Proud breeder, although currently taking a break since my original bitches are too old and my young bitch is too young.

    Worst part about being a breeder. The heartbreak of losing a puppy. To hold a still born pup that you knew was alive just minutes ago is so unbelievably sad. All the platitudes don't come close to easing the sorrow. The bitch usually doesn't notice if she's got live pups to nurse and lick. It's just you the breeder who mourns. Losing them after they're born isn't any easier, because then you know them. Bitches notice the loss of those pups. And your heart breaks for her and the platitudes really mean nothing to her!

    The next worst part is the constant clean up for the next 8-10 weeks. The cleaner the environs, the healthier the puppies. Then there's the clean up that begins as the puppies begin to eat solid food and mom stops cleaning up after them. Even if you litter box train your puppies (as more quality breeders are doing these days) it is A LOT OF WORK. Why do you think so many backyard breeders want to sell puppies at 5 and 6 weeks? The hell with socialization by the dam, just give me the money and get these little shits outta my kitchen!

    Then there's the money you spend getting your bitch qualified, tested, and trained. Then there's the stud fee, the costs involved in getting the semen to her (and the vet costs for implanting) or getting your bitch to the stud either driving (hotel/gas) or flying your girl to him (and back). Then there's the cost for the puppies' vet checks, de-worming, shots, docking and dewclaw removal if your breed calls for that. DNA testing for the puppies for registration and latest genetic testing.

    Now the good part. Puppies are cute, they make you laugh. If you aren't a fiscal realist, you can pretend you're making money when the puppies start selling (if you keep a balance sheet, you'll be in the red).

    Hopefully you've become a breeder because your girl is the love of your life and you love showing her off to judges (and they love her too) and you can't imagine life without another one just like her to show because you know she can't go into the ring forever. When you sell her puppies, you've asked the prospective owners a 1000 questions and they asked you just as many. The best part of breeding is when they send you pictures and notes and you see how loved your pup is. The ultimate compliment is when the those puppy owners call you years later and ask if you're having puppies anytime soon because your puppy is now almost 12 and they can't imagine living without one and your puppy was THE BEST EVER.

    To me the very best part of breeding is hearing the announcer call your name as a class winner or champion with the bitch or dog you bred. The respect you get from your fellow breeders gives you a quiet sense of pride.

    Then there's rescue. I'm a firm believer that if you breed, you MUST rescue and foster. That's not always easy. But I feel you are obligated to do your part to help the dogs who were bred and sold irresponsibly.

    There is a line I'm fond of quoting when tragedy strikes (and if you breed long enough it will). I want to put it on a tee shirt if only to invite people who are considering having a litter of puppies to ask me what it means. It would say: BREEDING: Not for the faint of heart.

    Finally, while most people here are talking about AKC breeds, the beauty of the JRTCA Jack Russell is that in addition to conformation classes for breeding stock, we also offer classes for neutered/spayed dogs to encourage people who won't be breeding their dogs to spay or neuter them. We also offer so many types of performance classes it doesn't matter if your dog has a prick ear, or a hard chest, or poor bite.. If they are fast they can race; if they can hunt we offer Go to Ground, Super Earth, and Barn/Brush Hunt classes. Those who like formal training can opt for Obedience (I know, a JRT oxymoron) and Agility. Fun events like Lure Coursing and Ball Retrieval mean any dog can compete in one or more classes at every trial. Also, we break our classes down by Puppy, Open Adult, Veteran, Senior and Geriatric. It's not unusual to see 14 yo JRTs in the Geriatric conformation; proof that good breeding leads to a long life!
    ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
    Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

    "Life is merrier with a terrier!"


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2011
    Posts
    816

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    Intersting reading here. I have a deposit on a puppy right now that I may or may not breed later. I plan on showing her, doing the health test, and looking at her with a very critical eye and if I breed will probably only have one litter.

    I have never bought a dog for myself, they always come to me, so this is my reward to self for being a good dog person.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2011
    Posts
    816

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    [QUOTE=Kryswyn;6828420] The ultimate compliment is when the those puppy owners call you years later and ask if you're having puppies anytime soon because your puppy is now almost 12 and they can't imagine living without one and your puppy was THE BEST EVER.

    QUOTE]

    The puppy I am getting is a Weim from the same bitch that my son's dog is from and the sire is the same bloodlines. We know my son's dog is quality and it was so nice to just call the same people when I was ready for a puppy.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,424

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luseride View Post
    Intersting reading here. I have a deposit on a puppy right now that I may or may not breed later. I plan on showing her, doing the health test, and looking at her with a very critical eye and if I breed will probably only have one litter.

    I have never bought a dog for myself, they always come to me, so this is my reward to self for being a good dog person.
    If you go into ownership wanting a nice, healthy dog for a pet with the potential for showing/breeding, you will be much happier than if you go into it hoping for a breeding quality dog. Even the most fantastic breedings don't always produce fabulous show quality puppies, and even in the same litter quality can be different. (I say, as the owner of a breeders "pick of the litter" puppy that grew 3" over the breed standard -- never showed once, but has been a great pet for almost 12 years....!)

    You'll have fun showing her and then you'll know whether she's breeding quality or not. It's way too early to even speculate, except for the fact that you're planning not to spay her so you can show. Are you planning to handle her yourself? Good luck!



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2001
    Location
    Almost Aiken
    Posts
    2,654

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kryswyn View Post
    To me the very best part of breeding is hearing the announcer call your name as a class winner or champion with the bitch or dog you bred. The respect you get from your fellow breeders gives you a quiet sense of pride.

    Well then, since Luna is the third dog I've bought from them, I hope I've given her breeders a measure of satisfaction Heaven knows I think the world of the dogs I've had from them!



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