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  1. #1
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    Apr. 1, 2012
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    Default Breeding Dogs

    Anyone here raise and breed dogs and/or show? Care to share the life, the good, the bad, the ugly, the proud moments? I know there are a lot bad breeders out there, and this isn't a discussion about puppy mills etc or the amount of dogs in need of rescue... I get that... but I"m curious about the breeders that are quality breeders raising quality dogs. thaniks.



  2. #2
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    I don't breed my dog *yet* but I do show him and got him from a very good breeder that breeds a litter every few years or so...(so not a "full time" breeder, if there is such a thing...) I suspect that my dog will be sought after as a sire in the future, so we will be dipping our feet into the waters a tiny bit someday.

    I think you'll find good dog breeders to be a lot like good horse breeders - it's not something you do to "make money", because breeding a good dog isn't as easy as it sounds...and to actually sell a dog for any real money you need to put a lot of time and energy (which often means some money too) behind the breeding -- showing your dog to demonstrate it's "worthiness" (in the show ring, field, obedience, agility, or whatever) as well as the health checks that will (hopefully) prevent poor outcomes in the puppies.

    It's more of a "lifestyle", I think, than a "job" - sort of like showing horses. You pay money for the privilege of having a judge tell you what they liked or didn't like about you (and your dog/horse).

    In my breed many of the breeders/exhibitors all know each other and showing is sort of like a family reunion (with the good and the bad). Some people love each other, some hate each other, lots of them talk about each other, but in the end most of us get along.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    In Trouble with Dad...
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    OH MY GOSH YOU EVIL BREEDER PERSON


    sorry, that kind of day, had to get it off my chest.

    There are a few who breed and show, somebody has the most adorable Cavalier King Charles spaniels. Sannois?

    I am considering to look at getting another Dalmatian...any leads?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  4. #4
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Someone would have to either be a masochist or really spoiling for a fight on a long dull day to step forward as a dog breeder in public any more.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    Someone would have to either be a masochist or really spoiling for a fight on a long dull day to step forward as a dog breeder in public any more.
    Why do you think the OP used an alter!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6

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    If you think horse people are crazy, try dog shows. That movie Best in Breed isn't far off the truth.

    My mom bred standard and mini Dachshunds. In all her years of breeding (with very high standards), she got maybe 4 or 5 really high quality dogs from each type. The rest were really nice pets. Lovely, just not the quality for the bigger shows. Even a good breeding program is still hit or miss.

    These days, it's about getting a really wealthy owner to buy one of your really nice dogs and turn it over to you to show. Like horses, it's not a poor man's game.
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Nov. 20, 2010
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    Upstate New York
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    Got into it a bit when I gave up the horses after getting married. Got a Lab as a family dog from a good friend, and she turned out to be a very nice dog. Was very specific with my breeding, only limited litters, and did loads of testing as one should. And I was very lucky to have a highly respected breed person nearby who was a wonderful mentor.

    But I thought it was even more subjective than horses at the shows. A lot of who do you know, or using a professional handler to campaign a dog. And, as it turned out, many of the dogs who place well don't end up being the best at stud.

    And as much as all of us animal people can sometimes be a little snarky or emotional, I thought the dog people even more out there than the horse people.

    But it sure was a lot easier loading the dogs in the back of the van, than trailering a horse. Plus they fit in the motel room.
    Being right half the time beats being half-right all the time. Malcolm Forbes



  8. #8
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyGiantPony View Post
    These days, it's about getting a really wealthy owner to buy one of your really nice dogs and turn it over to you to show. Like horses, it's not a poor man's game.
    I disagree, but like many things - it depends. Not in my breed, anyway.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Dec. 4, 2002
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    Ontario, Canada
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    My MIL and SIL breed and show their dogs, and have been doing so for over 15 years. They are the only Pharaoh Hound breeder in Canada. They sell their dogs all over the world to both show and pet homes. And she often has homes for twice if not three times as many puppies as she breeds. All of their dogs live in their home, they are family. At times they can have 7+ dogs living with them(my MIL's choice, that is way too many for my liking), and my MIL's life pretty much revolves around them. Much like horses. But it is what she loves and what makes her happy!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    I disagree, but like many things - it depends. Not in my breed, anyway.
    That's just me looking from the outside at who is successful at the occasional shows I attend. Not involved anymore except from a casual interest. Haven't been in the ring for more than 30 mumble mumble years when I did a couple of junior handler classes. It was never my cup of tea. I prefered horse poo to dog poo. LOL
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.



  11. #11
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    Oct. 1, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyGiantPony View Post
    If you think horse people are crazy, try dog shows. That movie Best in Breed isn't far off the truth.
    And if you think dog show people are crazy, try CAT shows. The craziest of the Krayzee.

    DH and I went to a dog show a few weeks ago. Being winter, it was inside. I'm not asthmatic, but I'm sensitive to things like perfumes, and I was coughing the whole rest of the weekend from the amount of "product" in the air.

    I would actually be interested in showing dogs, but I wish that it wasn't a requirement for your dog to be intact. Yes, I realize the point of a dog show (other than agility and obedience) is to examine breeding stock. But, much as a good stallion makes a great gelding, I don't think every dog needs to be kept in the breeding pool.
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    Someone would have to either be a masochist or really spoiling for a fight on a long dull day to step forward as a dog breeder in public any more.
    Only if they are an irresponsible or BYB. Responsible breeders that use quality (titled/proven) dogs for breeding, that they've done appropriate health testing on, who breed dogs that are older than 2 yrs, and breed to better the breed, don't get the criticism bad breeders do. People who breed because their dog is cute, breed young, untested, untitled dogs, deserve the criticism.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
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    Nov. 6, 2002
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    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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    Not at all afraid to step forward in public. Our daughter got us into breeding these dogs when she was 9, 17 years ago. Long story short, here's our website:

    www.starbornhavanese.com

    We have 2 or 3 litters a year, and have a waiting list. We don't advertise, other than our website, but get almost daily inquiries. We have people come to visit from all over the country.

    Our 7th generation is in the oven.


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyGiantPony View Post
    I prefered horse poo to dog poo. LOL
    Excellent point.


    But I will say, when looking at other houses to buy down the road, I really would prefer to have an attached double garage again - one side to hold the chain link run that I used to fill with shavings for when the puppies were getting too big to be in the house. Miss the breeding part - much more than the showing. Didn't do much, but it was done right - had lovely buyers who kept in touch years later.
    Being right half the time beats being half-right all the time. Malcolm Forbes



  15. #15
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    Jun. 26, 2001
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    Been showing and breeding Irish and Gordon setters for years. It has it's moments of glory and not so great moments with crazy ass dog people.

    You need to pick your breed, find the best quality dog you can from a winning line and an honest reputable breeder. You will need to keep this dog physically fit for the show ring, that means slim and tight, probably slimmer than you would like to see a dog be.

    You will need how to groom the dog for it's coat type so it will be show ring ready. This is soooo much harder than it looks. Short haired breeds are obviously easier, however remember a short haired dog is going to have to be super fit as there is no hair to hide anything.

    Long haired breeds can need tons of attention daily. During show season you will have to bathe sometimes 2-3 times a week and fully groom. Blow out the hair and trim trim snip clip trim some more!

    You have to learn what products work with certain coat types for the best show ring shine without greasy aftereffects etc. What will make a flyaway coat lay down etc. Short hair dogs need special products too.

    Do you want to handle your own dog or have a pro on it? If you handle you will need to take your pup and yourself to handling classes. They will teach you the tricks of getting around the ring properly and how to train your dog to show. This also takes lots of time at home training. My neighbors always laugh at me as I run around the street with youngsters. They play dog show judge for me!

    Which means your pup must totally be socialized and ready to be approached by strangers and touched. A growl will get your dog passed over for judging.

    There is a ton that goes into this. I would get some books on dog showing and start studying.

    Breeding starts when you establish a line of winners and only then. All your pups should be sold before they are born. And you will as a responsible breeder accept any of those pups back during their lifetime if the owner needs to give them up. That is what an honorable and responsible breeder does. Breeding dogs is very expensive! Tests, tests and more test to make sure your breeding stock is perfectly healthy so that you don't pass on any bad DNA to future lines you are breeding. This is again something to read up on big time! Breeding dogs gets very involved when done properly. You don't just put Bruno in with Puddles and hope for the best!
    Lions and Tigers and Bears, oh my!!


    8 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    Has anyone but me ever seen the ferret show people on some documentary on PBS? Cracks us up every time it's on, the whole family will watch. It's for real, and they're for real and very intense about it, but there's something just hilarious about watching people throw their ferret up in the air to build up their conformation and talk about the ferret bloodlines like I'm used to hearing people talk about horses... very entertaining!



  17. #17
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    Jul. 19, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sing Mia Song View Post
    I would actually be interested in showing dogs, but I wish that it wasn't a requirement for your dog to be intact. Yes, I realize the point of a dog show (other than agility and obedience) is to examine breeding stock. But, much as a good stallion makes a great gelding, I don't think every dog needs to be kept in the breeding pool.
    Then you show Agility and Obedience--it's allowed to have altered dogs there. There's no point to showing sterilized animals in Confo, though, since they can't pass on any good traits anyway.



  18. #18
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    Or you just don't breed your dogs. Although until you try showing your dog, it's hard to know if they should be kept in the breeding pool or not. That's part of the reason to show them, and if they are not good enough for breeding you can alter them (even if they did finish a championship).

    I also know that altered dogs can be shown in special classes at specialty shows and junior handling (so if you have a child or a younger sibling that is interested); you can show a dog to its championship and then have it altered if you don't plan to breed. But you could still participate in some types of conformation events and, of course, show in performance events.

    Part of the fun of showing dogs (in my opinion) is the breed club events - our local club sponsors other events besides conformation shows.



  19. #19
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    Dec. 1, 2010
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    MA
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    I agree that dog people are 10 times crazier than horse people. I brought a very experienced friend with me when I bought my puppy, to make sure she had the potential to be a show dog. Showing her to her championship was a lot of fun.

    After she finished, I decided to try my hand at breeding. I breed her to a very nice stud, and had a nice litter. Some of the people that came to look at the puppies were nuts too. Raising the litter and screening homes was very stressful. We kept two puppies, and decided the breeding thing wasn't for us, so spayed/neutered. All in all, including all the health testing on our bitch and the $$ from 5 puppies we sold, we spent $2000 to have the litter.

    My friend has been breeding/showing for close to 30yrs. She has very nice dogs. She also tells people that whelping out a litter is not for the faint of heart. She had 1 puppy, born at 2am, with it's intestines on the outside for example.



  20. #20
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    May. 24, 2006
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    I have been heavily involved in the sport of purebred dogs for over 30 years. Conformation, obedience, field and judging. It is like any other animal endeavor. You must be dedicated, committed to the animals, willing to continue learning, have a critical eye for your breeding stock, be willing to change direction if a problem comes up, be willling to devote the time and money to travel, show, and train your dogs. You have to be willing to give up other luxuries to keep your dogs in the best physical and mental state. You need a sense of humor to deal with the ups and downs. You must be a good sport and realize that sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, it all even out. Competition brings out the best in some people, the worst in others. If you decide to breed it is a huge investment, one that not everyone is willing to make. You will lose countless hours whelping your litter and raising them properly. You will want to bang your head on the wall screening potential puppy buyers. It is a lifestyle choice that not eveyone is cut out for. To me, I get an enormous sense of pride being a good steward of my breed. A well bred purebred dog of any breed is in addition to being a great friend and companion is a piece of living history in your life. Some breeds date to the times of true antiquity and it is an honor to be trusted with carrying them on for the next generation of people to enjoy.


    3 members found this post helpful.

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