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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    3,836

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    Quote Originally Posted by pal-o-mino View Post
    You're the self-proclaimed shoe expert.
    Where have I ever proclaimed such a thing? Damn, I forgot, that 'reading for content in context with comprehension' requirement is, in your case, waived.........



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,386

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    Quote Originally Posted by pal-o-mino View Post
    I don't understand the attitude of these farriers.

    I know mine is pretty good, she doesn't have time to go to message boards and be snarky or whatever it is. Her work speaks for itself, not her big mouth. Seems like Rick and Tom just hang around waiting for someone to post a hoof thread.

    My horse has weird feet too and needs a specific trim. If she gets it, she's fine. If not, she's off. I wouldn't call her lame. She's got weird feet.
    a couple of very knowledgeable farriers contribute to this board & you want 'em to feck off
    - curious who will be providing the same level of expertise, not your farrier (who's too busy), obviously not you (who lacks the knowledge)

    If you really don't like someone it's pretty easy to put that person on "Ignore" & their contentious posts will no longer show on your computer.

    & yes, a horse that needs specific foot care to walk off "not lame", is generally considered to be "not sound"


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2010
    Posts
    2,200

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    Ok let's not get our knickers in a bunch. Rick I really appreciate your advice although your delivery system does take some getting used to.

    To answer your question, no, if he is trimmed incorrectly he doesn't walk off lame. Consistent trimming with a low heel will eventually result in a toe-first, short strided landing, but it takes several trims to see any change.

    I'm not going to shoe all winter just because we get a few days with snow on the ground. While I appreciate the advice, I'd rather just put Vaseline on his feet and pick them every few hours.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2010
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    70

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    Can’t speak for Rick and Tom but I always get a hardy chuckle at folks who think a farrier's skill and/or success is inversely related to how much time they spend at home or on personal pursuits.

    I LOVE shoeing horses and I like to think I'm ok at it but I also (gasp) have hobbies and (double gasp) want to be able to climb a flight of stairs unassisted when I am 60.

    The secret is to realize that horse ownership is a luxury hobby and charge enough that you DON’T have to slave 14 hours day/ 7 days a week to make ends meet.
    Seth Parker- Farrier for Palm Beach & Broward, FL
    www.ParkerFarrierService.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
    Location
    Pen Argyl PA
    Posts
    3,705

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    as someone who has tried it all- Vaseline, Cooking spray, Mineral oil, Etc..i will tell you- don't waste your time. it does Absolutely NOTHING to help the snowballs. If you want to help your horse, Shoe it and use snow rims.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2009
    Location
    NCC DE
    Posts
    2,225

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    There are a number of very good farriers in SE PA. There are 3 that I know of that have clients in the barn where I board (hacking distance to Fairhill). None of them are inexpensive. If you're interested in their contact info shoot me a PM.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
    Posts
    3,836

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    Quote Originally Posted by SAcres View Post
    Ok let's not get our knickers in a bunch. Rick I really appreciate your advice although your delivery system does take some getting used to.
    Noted.

    To answer your question, no, if he is trimmed incorrectly he doesn't walk off lame. Consistent trimming with a low heel will eventually result in a toe-first, short strided landing, but it takes several trims to see any change.
    Noted.

    I'm not going to shoe all winter just because we get a few days with snow on the ground. While I appreciate the advice, I'd rather just put Vaseline on his feet and pick them every few hours.
    Noted. Although since you get such few days of snow, you could just keep him stalled at those infrequent times.....



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    3,836

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    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerFarrierService View Post
    Can’t speak for Rick and Tom but I always get a hardy chuckle at folks who think a farrier's skill and/or success is inversely related to how much time they spend at home or on personal pursuits.
    I find that if you're that "covered up" with work, you're probably not charging enough. And if you're that covered-up, how do you find time for continuing education and skill improvement/enhancement? I find that its 'quality' not 'quantity' that in the long run, pays the bills, actual and intrinsic.

    I LOVE shoeing horses and I like to think I'm ok at it but I also (gasp) have hobbies and (double gasp) want to be able to climb a flight of stairs unassisted when I am 60.
    Jeez, Seth, I suppose you also want to be able to retire with some money. And you probably want to have some fine motor skills left in your hands too. LOL!
    Does using the stair railing when climbing stairs count as assisted or unassisted?

    The secret is to realize that horse ownership is a luxury hobby and charge enough that you DON’T have to slave 14 hours day/ 7 days a week to make ends meet.
    Exactly. Charge 'em 'till you like them, understand the difference between quality and quantity, understand the importance of "NO!", and don't let the tail wag the dog. And, perhaps most importantly, work to rid your custom of brain dead, anthropomorphic twits who on the best day of their woebegotten lives wouldn't make a pimple on a true horseman's butt. Or absent that, as noted, charge 'em 'till you like them aka: "pencil whipping".



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2007
    Location
    Andover, MA
    Posts
    5,348

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nezzy View Post
    IMO- i would find a regular farrier, have him apply shoes with rim pads. I have a horse who cannot go bf and he snowballs without the rim pads( one year it snowed early and i did not have his rim pads on yet-so i found out the hard way). it might be an expense but it is cheaper than letting him pull a tendon, or other injury.
    Pretty much what I'd say. One of the things that caused me to shoe my mare all around, rather than just in front, was watching her limping around when she got snowballs in her back hooves. Having had enough lameness issues with her already, it was worth the extra few hundred dollars per year for her to have shoes all around.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    6,172

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    Ski wax will work much better than any oil or grease, but I can't speak to the success of applying it to a bare hoof.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
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    4,932

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    My husband has a horse that he shoes that is similar, OP-he keeps snowball pads on him.

    DH would have told you that was your best option without the whole "tear you down and build you back up" routine too.


    3 members found this post helpful.

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