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  1. #1
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    Jan. 25, 2013
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    Default Inspection Handler Fees

    What are the costs involved with presenting a mare and foal at an inspection in regard to handlers fees, irrelevant to registry fees?



  2. #2
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    Dec. 2, 2002
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    I can only speak of my experiences at the KWPN-NA keurings where we typically have a handler from Holland and he charges $50.00/horse (cash). That includes taking the horse into the winners' ring, if necessary.

    P.S.: Guess I should further explain that this handler initially presents the foal while I hold the mare, then the halter comes off the foal and the handler starts running with the mare. So I still get involved in the presentation....
    Siegi Belz
    www.stalleuropa.com
    2007 KWPN-NA Breeder of the Year
    Dutch Warmbloods Made in the U. S. A.



  3. #3
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    Mar. 28, 2003
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    Hunterdon County, NJ
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    About $50-$60 for presentation. I'll add a tip also, depending. Some handlers are very generous with their time, helping to get the mare and foal to and from the ring, showing the mare and foal again if the foal gets special recognition like best colt/ filly, or helping hold the mare or foal during branding. I like to reward any extra help on the part of the handler -- that help can make a huge difference in a hectic day!
    Kendra
    Runningwater Warmbloods & Mare Station

    Home of SPS Diorella (Donnerhall/ Akut), EMC What Fun (Wolkentanz I/ Lauries Crusador), and EMC Raleska (Rascalino/ Warkant) 'Like' us on Facebook



  4. #4
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    Aug. 15, 2010
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    I've also seen fees $50 from a few different handlers at both inspections and DSHB classes. And like Siegi - usually the owner is also in the ring for a mare and foal.



  5. #5
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    Jan. 29, 2013
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    wouldn't most people just have a friend or barn buddy that is familiar with the horses come along to help?



  6. #6
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    Jul. 21, 2011
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    Not usually. A good handler can make the horses look their best and a bad one can be a disaster.. JMHO from a spectator's point of view.



  7. #7
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    Dec. 14, 2011
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    Its not about "help". Its about professional presentation. They have to run FAST, present the mare (so they're looking at her), keep an eye on the foal, and, like most things, done well, it only looks easy!



  8. #8
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    Not sure why this thread is in the Dressage forum instead of the Breeding forum (which is frequented by lots of folks very familiar with mare/foal inspections), but we use a handler for our inspections with probably 30-odd years handling mares, foals, and stallions (including NA and her native Holland, where she started handling as a young teenager). She knows all the tips and tricks and there is no one in this area that does a better job at presenting in hand horses for inspection or at breed shows. For many years, she only charged $40, and I would tell her every year it wasn't enough, so last year, she charged $45. She tends to not charge extra for a mare/foal combination (where both are presented for inspection), but for the inspections I organize, I list her rate on the entry form at $45/horse, or $50 for a mare/foal combination. Most of our breeders use her, and since she is kept busy handling so many horses, she doesn't have time to help people get them to/from the barn - they have to be brought to the in-gate for her. She also always helps in the walk (premium) ring, and will usually take the mare/foal most likely to win top accolades, OR the most unruly mare/foal (last year, we had a strapping 6 month old colt at the inspection who needed to be weaned and gelded PRONTO, and she handled him in the walk ring because he was too much for his owner to deal with - was really excited to be in there with all those mares and fillies and spent a lot of time on his hind legs!)



  9. #9
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    Jul. 6, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by equinekingdom View Post
    wouldn't most people just have a friend or barn buddy that is familiar with the horses come along to help?
    In addition to what others have said, I've been to the breed show days at Dressage At Devon where this is exactly what some people did - to their own peril and the peril of everyone else on the grounds, as a quiet mare & foal can become fire-breathing & flying dragons when thrust into a strange & exciting environment where the only person they know is no longer calm, but suddenly strangely electric with show nerves & unsure how to handle the firebreathing dragon on the end of their lead . . .
    Hidden Echo Farm, Carlisle, PA -- home of JC palomino sire Canadian Kid (1990 - 2013) & AQHA sire Lark's Favorite, son of Rugged Lark.



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by KBEquine View Post
    In addition to what others have said, I've been to the breed show days at Dressage At Devon where this is exactly what some people did - to their own peril and the peril of everyone else on the grounds, as a quiet mare & foal can become fire-breathing & flying dragons when thrust into a strange & exciting environment where the only person they know is no longer calm, but suddenly strangely electric with show nerves & unsure how to handle the firebreathing dragon on the end of their lead . . .
    Ha! So what percentage of people that actually own these horses actually present them themselves?

    what percentage of them have no horse experience and are just there for the money?

    Is this less about a horse-person's thing and more about the spectator part and owning an expensive horse that wins the ribbons?

    Do most of the horses change because of how the owner/handler is?



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by equinekingdom View Post
    Ha! So what percentage of people that actually own these horses actually present them themselves?

    what percentage of them have no horse experience and are just there for the money?

    Is this less about a horse-person's thing and more about the spectator part and owning an expensive horse that wins the ribbons?

    Do most of the horses change because of how the owner/handler is?
    Many owners/breeders are not spring chickens who can run for the distances necessary and at the speed ,that shows the horse to it's best advantage.

    Why the hostility?

    ETA; You don't seem to understand that most often, the person who enters the horse in the class is the breeder, not someone without a clue who is there "for the money".

    What money?

    Registery approvals and breed classes COST the entrants' money. It is not a profitable venture for short term owners.
    Last edited by skydy; Feb. 16, 2013 at 04:11 AM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    I want my hard work and investment presented to it's best advantage and I am just not qualified. Skydy, you're exactly right. The only "money" involved with my horses is what I "spend" on them!



  13. #13
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    Luckily, RPSI lets you turn the horses loose after they walk the triangle, so I haven't had to pay a handle in a while.

    But last time I did, it was $50.

    As for getting some one else to show your horse -- why not? The idea, as others have stated, is to show the horse to the best advantage and if I can't do it, then I should be smart enough to hire someone who can.

    Even if you are young and fit, there are many people who can't do the job because they can't move fast enough. Take a look at stallion licensing in Europe -- almost ALL those guys are tall, lanky dudes with L-O-N-G legs. Speaking for myself, I have a bad hip and can barely walk, much less run.

    But even with my hip fixed, no way I can run fast enough to show a horse to it's best advantage.

    The idea of making money with these horses is so laughable...



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