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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2009
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    706

    Default Tell me about Jack Russells

    I adore Jack Russells, but have never owned one. Those of you who have them - what can you tell me about them? Temperament, trainability, etc?

    I like the short legged ones, but don't know a lot about the differences between the various sub-types.

    We're a dog home - we currently have several retired greyhounds. How would a Jack Russell get along with them?

    Any breeders I should consider in the New England area?

    Thanks all!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
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    Suffolk, VA
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    Default

    JRT's are high energy, highly intelligent and LOVE and are very devoted to their people. They are not necessarily easy on other animals..mine have a strong prey drive and considering that they are still a working terrier breed, that's no surprise. If you want a ratter, they are excellent...but are also good at chicken killing...I know this first hand. However, mine coexist nicely with our cat and get along with other dogs well enough. They are good on hikes and stay close to us...don't take off and not come back.

    Some are more trainable than others. They have a typical terrier independent sort of personality and while they may understand what you want them to do, it might not fit into their plans. I have heard of some that were excellent obedience dogs but I'd say that's the exception versus the rule.

    My old heart dog Darby, who died about 4 years ago was my best friend. He went everywhere with me, never fought with other dogs, was a fine hunter in the trials and real life and a great sire. I have his grandpups now and am glad to still have his legacy. I love the big dog in a little body mentality they have and will always have some Russells around.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2005
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    451

    Default

    They are shaped like footballs for a reason....


    Sorry, couldn't resist


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2012
    Location
    Southeast US
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    Default

    The best description I've ever heard of JRTs is "devil in a dog suit."


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
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    10,033

    Default

    I had one. She was pretty extreme in many ways: great longevity, health, enthusiasm and energy. Very affectionate. She was cute as all get out and everyone loved her. She wanted what she wanted and one thing she wanted was not to be left alone. She had a high prey drive but the rabbits usually thwarted her. She got along OK with the cats as long as they didn't get between her and her people and her food. Great joie de vivre and 0 sense of self preservation.

    Oh and incredibly athletic. Could that dog ever jump!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2008
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    4,538

    Default

    they are high energy, ratting machines. They are clever and easy to train, providing you actually DO train them. They are assertive so +P is not the best way to train them.

    I found a little guy running on the road a number of years ago. His owner didn't want him anymore so let him stay with me. My best friend ended up fostering him and kept him for the rest of his life. He was a cool little dog, courageous to a fault, portable and quite the hunter.

    she said she'll never have another. I never questioned her why, if he set the bar too high, or if he was such a PITA that she'll never try it again.

    I'd have one if I knew the dog/dog aggressiveness was low.

    check out Sows Ear Farm for some good JRT's.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2008
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    717

    Default

    They are nasty little dogs who insist on sleeping in your bed and hogging all the covers. They fight first and think about who they are fighting with later. Typical Irish, as my husband says. That's for my benefit, a first generation immigrant.
    Just the other day, after we had had a lot of rain, but it was a rather warm day, Sir Russell discovers a vole or mouse, has it in his mouth, me yelling drop it , drop it, he eats . it . whole... gulp,gulp gulp, like a dolphin eating a fish. Hey if you can deal with that you'll love you some russells. We also call them the Irish Terriorists.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Aug. 28, 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by threedogpack View Post

    she said she'll never have another. I never questioned her why, if he set the bar too high, or if he was such a PITA that she'll never try it again.
    Probably both.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 1999
    Location
    Just Enough Farm, GA
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    2,228

    Default

    I've never had one, but intend to soon. This breeder is in Mass and her dogs are adorable! http://doubledjackrussells.com/home.shtml
    If you believe everything you read, better not read. -- Japanese Proverb




  10. #10
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    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
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    Default

    My JRT's are great bed warmers and cuddlers. Nothing like 3 JRT's sidled up to you on a cold night!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 14, 2008
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    294

    Default

    We adore our Jack mutt. Typical puppy mill mutt being he came from a puppy store and we live in Lancaster, PA.

    He is high maintenance and hyper in tuned to where you are and what your doing. I have never once see him venture on his own to nap. Hes either napping on top of you or going 100 miles an hour. There really is no in between.

    He does Ok with our cat, but our cat tends to instigate although, I will say he is extremely jealous of who is getting our attention.

    The days he does not get enough exercise we know it and the days he does, well then hes usually sleeping or following you around with flat bat ears and whining at you. This is how he asks you to just sit down already so he can nap.

    He's 2 and still needs to be confined to his cage. I don't think he will ever be trusted enough to not, but he actually really enjoys being in there so it works for us.

    Truthfully, they are supposed to be super smart but I swear mine is about as dumb as a brick. So far the only commands we have are sit, lay down and stay and those are really only when he wants too. I know this is due to our lack of knowledge training wise, but we are consistant work on training constantly and have ready books on it. If he was portable (gets extreme motion sickness in the car) he would of went to a professional along time ago and I recommend doing that.

    Oh- and he is absolutely 100% awful around our horses. See- extreme jealously issues. He ignores them if you are doing barn work and they are milling around but the moment you casually walk by a horse and talk/pet and he goes bonkers. Its the most extreme obnoxious high pitch constant yap you have ever heard in your life.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Location
    Lake County, IL
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    Default

    I got a small female JRT from the animal shelter. Everyone said I was crazy because it was probably sent to the pound for a reason. She was much older, but still had a lot of energy and I had her for a few years. She was the coolest little dog ever. Got along with other cats and dogs. Incredibly friendly. Went to horse shows with me. It's been about 10 years since she passed and I still miss her.

    Had a friend who had one from a breeder, and that little dog fit the Irish Terrorist description. He was nasty.


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  13. #13
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    Dec. 2, 2004
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    3,322

    Default

    Gramps was a solid big dog man ... until we got our first Russell. That dog was nothing but the best, ever. #2 is a constant at his side now. She came from Chicago, found her on Pet Finder - no one in the city needs a Russell, she drove them nuts. They shoved her at us and never said good-bye or looked back. She merrily rode off with us on her new adventure! Wow did she get a nice surprise here with her country life!! And we've never had a problem with her (besides her being a racist - she'd had some bad experiences in the city so we can't take her to town, it's too embarrassing). There will be more, but one at a time

    JRT owners just have to realize that the dog needs space and boundaries. We've never penned or tied one. We explain the rules and then it's a done deal. The owners need to be independent tenatious types like the breed to understand them.

    I prefer the hardier hunting bred JRTs. The JRTCA, don't they require 5X outbreeding to prevent genetic faults?
    About the only time losing is more fun than winning is when you're fighting temptation.
    -- Tom Wilson, actor & comedian



  14. #14
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    Apr. 1, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperAlter View Post
    Truthfully, they are supposed to be super smart but I swear mine is about as dumb as a brick. So far the only commands we have are sit, lay down and stay and those are really only when he wants too.
    well. I dunno about the dumb as a brick, but traditional training isn't recommended for Jacks.



  15. #15
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    15,417

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by idlemoon View Post
    They are shaped like footballs for a reason....


    Sorry, couldn't resist
    They are also shaped like speed bumps. They feel like those, too, when you run over them.... the deaf ones.... who are also ok afterwards.

    Truly, do the dog, yourself and the world a favor by being the right person to own a JRT. I don't know what the right kind of person is, but IMO, the Wrong JRT owner is the one who thinks it's cute when they pick fights with other animals and just.won't.quit.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2000
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    Full time in Delhi, NY!
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    6,398

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Debbie View Post
    I've never had one, but intend to soon. This breeder is in Mass and her dogs are adorable! http://doubledjackrussells.com/home.shtml
    Double D terriers are excellent examples of the JRTCA Jack Russell. I have one myself. As a breeder, I could've chosen from any fellow breeder, but I choose Double D because of their conformation, ability and temperament.

    The "short legged ones" are now an AKC breed, the Russell Terrier, and now will set you back $1,200-$1,500 since they've been recognized. Beware of Russell Terrier breeders offering or demanding "Breeder's Terms" where you will have to breed your bitch and have puppies for her breeder. Many breeders do this so they don't have to keep so many dogs and yet can make money off them. You may or may not be required to bear the expenses of showing them to a championship (and if you're NOT required to show, then the breeder is definitely in it just for the money because an ethical breeder would insist that breeding stock prove itself in the ring).

    Best thing to do is go to www.therealjackrussell.com and read their FAQS and take the Jack Russell Profiler (bottom center of the home page under "Favorite Links") to see if you're really suited for being a JRT owner. If you are, please consider adopting from either Russell Rescue (all over) or Russell Refuge (upstate NY). That way you'll know if your new dog will get along with the greyhounds.
    ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
    Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

    "Life is merrier with a terrier!"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2000
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    Full time in Delhi, NY!
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pony grandma View Post
    I prefer the hardier hunting bred JRTs. The JRTCA, don't they require 5X outbreeding to prevent genetic faults?
    No. The JRTCA prohibits Father/daughter, mother/son matings. 1/2 siblings are allowed but no more than 2x in a pedigree. There's an inbreeding quotient but no one I've EVER known has had pups unregisterable because of that. Line breeding is permitted, but those who are doing that have the quotient formula available and don't inbreed. Most linebreeders today have set their lines and know when to breed away from their line and when to come back to it.

    There are still MANY breeders in the JRTCA who breed for working ability. I'd suggest asking around when you want another one as good working homes are hard to come by.

    Most JRTCA breeders have their breeding stock tested for eyes (CERF) hearing (BAER) dna testing for PLL and LOA. If the breeder you talk to says they don't need to test RUN THE OTHER WAY unless you like paying large vet bills for things (like deafness) that can be bred out.
    ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
    Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

    "Life is merrier with a terrier!"



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2000
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    2,430

    Default

    Just like anything else, it depends on the individual.

    I always said I would never own a male Jack Russell Terrier. Of course, what shows up in my yard and won't leave? Yup. But he is still here because he is obedient, calm, very rarely barks (I'm always surprised when he does), gets along with my other two dogs, and doesn't bother the horses. He very gently licks the tears from my Cocker's face and keeps the other dog's ears clean. All three sleep in a pile together during the day, and he's under my bed at night.

    He does search out rats in the barn, and often goes walkabout by going under my wire fence (it's how he got in in the first place, I just have to keep plugging the new holes) but he doesn't go far and always comes back. He's solid muscle, but loves to sleep in the sun, too. I'd have another if it was guaranteed he or she would be like this guy, but I know he's not typical.

    My neighbor has a Jack with her Greyhound and 3 other dogs. Her JRT is almost 20.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
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    14,577

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    I bred them for many years from an original bitch bought in 1977 from the hunt in Dorset - bred her to our Huntsman's JR for her first litter. Great little, terrier dogs - always happy, always spunky.

    After they got fashionable there were too many randomly bred dogs and their
    reputations deteriorated. We dined out on our JR stories.

    There are still good ones out there, but you have to check them out to avoid a hysterical, yappy fiend.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2009
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    706

    Default

    Great info! Thanks for the links.

    We do have a fenced yard and plenty of space. Temperament is key for us, especially with the other dogs.

    Has anyone seen major differences between the males and females in terms of personality?



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