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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2005
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    261

    Default BREED CHARACTERISTICS?

    I know it varies from horse to horse, but what would you guess a Connemara-TB would be like? Brave? Scopey? Spooky?

    Am sort of in the market.....



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,189

    Default

    In my experience, Connemaras can all jump. My ConnxTB could jump the moon but would NOT go through water.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2010
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario
    Posts
    336

    Default

    I had a Connemara/TB whom I started and took up through Prelim. He had (has) tremendous scope and could probably go Advanced. I sold him to a Young Rider. Despite being small (15.3), he was a powerhouse and had a BIG stride. Very bold and very genuine, would jump absolutely anything and was great with water. He was on the hot side, very forward thinking; he would pack around novices in the ring but out in the field he was not for a novice rider as he was too strong and had too much "go" for a timid rider. I loved riding him cross country, though; he was always looking for the next fence. He was the best cross country horse I've ever had, possessing the best balance of forward and bold with rideability and a quick-thinking "pony" brain.

    I think this is pretty typical of Connemaras and Connemara crosses; they are not your typical "kid's ponies", they are big horses in small packages! My guy was also on the anxious side and needed a really relaxed rider in dressage. He also came with a few quirks (like not tolerating spray bottles), but I think those were his own idiosyncratic issues. He was such a clever little guy and I absolutely adored him. I would have another Connemara/TB in a heartbeat, if I could find a taller one!

    In terms of bloodlines, his sire was a son of Belfast Bonfire (an Ontario stallion by Hideaway's Sebastian), who was out of a mare by Maplehurst Michael MacDaire. The dam was a TB by Ten Gold Pots out of Oka, who was also the dam of the Ontario hunter stallion, Tell Oka (for any of you Canucks who remember him!).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2006
    Location
    Nor Cal
    Posts
    1,939

    Default

    Just like any breed temperament varies widely between individuals and in some cases by pedigree (there are some lines that are known to run a more hot). I have known some that I would consider difficult/sensitive and others more naturally even tempered/good natured. I agree with the above they are more horselike in size/gaits but also very quick and clever if not a little cheeky in a very ponylike way. Most are brave and scopey jumpers but I have seen a few that couldn't climb out of a paper bag or who tended toward a shorter stride/ flat safe jumping style (more of a hunter character--rather than real scope or natural athleticism).

    I ride a purebred Connemara that I would not really consider a good first pony/novice rider type (though he is getting more consistent)--And its not that he is inherently evil but more that he has 'opinions' and a great since of 'justice/fairness'. He does not tolerate/forgive mistakes as easily as some others might. I have others who are more generous/forgiving and infinitely more suited to a junior/novice rider.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    4,556

    Default

    I think it does vary widely.

    We had a Connemara TB cross – bought a Connemara mare (she was by Custusha’s Cashel Rock) that was in foal by a TB. She was about 14.1 hands, and the foal was to be my (short!) sister’s mount. Well, he grew and grew, and finished at about 16.3! (and was the exact same sooty buckskin as his grandsire).

    He was difficult as a youngster, had quite a buck and would toss his rider (or even trainer) from time to time (at one point he had dumped everyone that had ever ridden him, including me of course!)

    He was a little long, and a bit of a bag of parts, but was athletic. Once he matured and settled into training, he progressed up to prelim level eventing, and then went onto intercollege stuff for a while (ridability had improved).



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2003
    Location
    ny,ny usa
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Love them! We have always had Connemaras. I was given my first Connemara at the age of 1 - he was a yearling then and grew to be 15h so my mother rode and hunted him until I was big enough. Fabulous pony. Others that we have bred more recently include Dunlewey Roller who has been competing in puissance competitions in Ireland. We've also been crossing them quite a bit with bigger horses - thoroughbreds and Anglo Arabs mainly - and they make amazing and very desirable smaller horses. See the bottom four pictures on this page for an idea of type. http://biddesdenstud.co.uk/10632.html
    Last edited by rebeccag; Feb. 10, 2013 at 07:39 AM. Reason: More to add



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,659

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    I know that the Connemara/TB crosses can be very nice, but I have never in my life met one that was easy. As a matter of fact I had a bad perception of Connemaras most of my life based on my experiences with Conn/TB crosses over the years. I think they can be quite nice if raised and started correctly by a very competent rider and trainer, but all I have known were very hot, very forward and quite complicated. I do know of a couple that, with a lot of patience and consistent work, are becoming very nice horses with age.

    That said, I am a fan. The 3 year old purebred I had is a wonderful childs pony already at 6 years old, but she was sensitive to start. I have a 3 year old Connemara/Arabian who also needs patience and tact (and a lot of discipline, lol) but I believe she will ultimately turn into a super star and a trustworthy childs pony. I am starting to learn that because they are so athletic and sensitive and smart they need a bit of special handling, especially when crossed with a hot-blood, but I think if you find one that has been started and trained correctly and with love it's hard to find a better friend and athlete.

    Oh, and they tend to be super sound and tough as nails, and game for just about anything!! My purebred also HATED water though, I don't know that she would have ever made an eventer, getting her into water was nearly impossible.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
    Posts
    7,536

    Default

    not much experience with con x tb, but i have a pb Con gelding that i got as a 2 yo - he is 5 this year. He has been very interesting to train and very different than i had thought he would be.

    when i started him he had no engine and was very very very laid back - he is also quite sensitive altho sensible.

    now, i swear i have no idea when all the energy came from but there is no lack of energetic forward effort - he also has the best desire to please of any horse i have ever ridden.

    he goes thru water no problem and is temperament wise one of the best horses i have ever owned. plus he had cute pony ears! and fwiw, he is 15h.

    i think that like all breeds, while there are certain characteristics of the breed, each animal has its own personality etc. so look at the horse in front of you....



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
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    7,536

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    Quote Originally Posted by rebeccag View Post
    Love them! We have always had Connemaras. I was given my first Connemara at the age of 1 - he was a yearling then and grew to be 15h so my mother rode and hunted him until I was big enough. Fabulous pony. Others that we have bred more recently include Dunlewey Roller who has been competing in puissance competitions in Ireland. We've also been crossing them quite a bit with bigger horses - thoroughbreds and Anglo Arabs mainly - and they make amazing and very desirable smaller horses. See the bottom four pictures on this page for an idea of type. http://biddesdenstud.co.uk/10632.html
    your horses are lovely!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2003
    Location
    ny,ny usa
    Posts
    23

    Default

    @Mbm Thank you very much!



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