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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caravale View Post
    Agreed.

    This board is almost backward-elitist toward the Thoroughbred. Yeah, I get it, TBs can be great, TBs get incentive programs, TBs need homes because they failed at the track, TBs aren't crazy, TBs are better than Warmbloods, TBs are smarter, TBs are the bestest ever, my TB is just ALWAYS mistaken for a Warmblood which I just find so highly offensive, TB TB TB. Did we mention TB!?

    It's enough to drive some people AWAY from the TB...

    Why can't a good horse just be a good horse and leave it at that?
    Maybe the TB fans (myself included) are simply sick of WB fans constantly stereotyping and dissing TBs, regardless of temperament, conformation or accomplishments. Seems to me that the TB fans have been subjected to plenty of "elitist" WB attitudes for an awfully long time.

    That said, I agree that a good horse is a good horse.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  2. #62
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    Sep. 20, 2007
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    south of loxahatchee, fla
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    Default time will tell

    Quote Originally Posted by Molly Sorge View Post
    Hasn't showed yet.
    The TBs were here long before the WBs. The last few years at WEF, the TB classes are small..
    With the OTTB incentives, I am hoping to see a big division.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #63
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    Outside of COTH, I encounter it all the time. It is very annoying, since I say nothing about their horses' breeds and how they should be. Here on COTH... thankfully it is much less. But outside of this gold fish bowl stereotypes are alive and well. People do need to see this and read these articles!

    That being said I love how much OTTBs are exposed to and how insistent their grooms are on manners. I know what expectations to have right off the bat, with some tweaking of course dependent on the horse. But I can appreciate that he is young, recently gelded, and still dead quiet and it could be surprising. We don't know how quiet she means. He sounds like a good egg and very adaptable.

    I have had very nice TBs, but I do have one now who has her moments for sure. And when she does she is certainly stereotypical. But when she is worked regularly, they are few and far in between, and the rest of the time she is extremely quiet. I do agree they are like any other breed, all kinds of personalities although all of mine have been real triers for their person and not very spooky at all, which I love, be it from exposure or breeding.

    Hoping I can participate in some TIP classes sometime in the future!

    I have had great luck with TBs, never really owning one I would describe as hot per say.



  4. #64
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    Feb. 28, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satin Filly View Post
    While I loved this article, I have to admit a few comments had me thinking "Oh come on...seriously?!"...the OTTB stereotypes are killing me in this article! The PRO had the working student get on first, why?...Oh because he's off the track so he must be crazy...I'll let you be the test dummy!
    To be fair, the whole test dummy part probably had nothing to do with that fact that its a TB and way more with the fact that the horse is green, and a baby. The working student would have gotten on the horse first even if it was a warmblood.


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  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caravale View Post
    Agreed.

    This board is almost backward-elitist toward the Thoroughbred. Yeah, I get it, TBs can be great, TBs get incentive programs, TBs need homes because they failed at the track, TBs aren't crazy, TBs are better than Warmbloods, TBs are smarter, TBs are the bestest ever, my TB is just ALWAYS mistaken for a Warmblood which I just find so highly offensive, TB TB TB. Did we mention TB!?

    It's enough to drive some people AWAY from the TB...

    Why can't a good horse just be a good horse and leave it at that?
    As someone who purchased a lovely "first horse" type TB knowing that even though he is the perfect first horse that I would have a hard time selling him because he is a TB, I WANT people to keep fighting the stereotype...even if it means there are folks that get annoyed. There is no reason my horse shouldn't be worth just as much as something with the WB label on it and shouldn't be just as easy to sell, but you can guarantee that it will be harder to sell him and the price won't be near what it would be if he was a WB, if it ever comes down to that.

    It can't be left at "a good horse is a good horse" because most people don't believe that. A good TB is still a TB and a good WB is BETTER! in most people's eyes.


    BTW - I would never say my TB is confused for a WB. He looks exactly like a Sam Savitt drawn TB. My WB, however, was always confused for an Arabian. :teehee:
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"


    6 members found this post helpful.

  6. #66
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    Feb. 18, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satin Filly View Post
    While I loved this article, I have to admit a few comments had me thinking "Oh come on...seriously?!"...the OTTB stereotypes are killing me in this article! The PRO had the working student get on first, why?...Oh because he's off the track so he must be crazy...I'll let you be the test dummy!
    That's pretty standard in almost any barn when a young/problem horse comes in—it's not just because it's a TB.


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  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    As someone who purchased a lovely "first horse" type TB knowing that even though he is the perfect first horse that I would have a hard time selling him because he is a TB, I WANT people to keep fighting the stereotype...even if it means there are folks that get annoyed. There is no reason my horse shouldn't be worth just as much as something with the WB label on it and shouldn't be just as easy to sell, but you can guarantee that it will be harder to sell him and the price won't be near what it would be if he was a WB, if it ever comes down to that.

    It can't be left at "a good horse is a good horse" because most people don't believe that. A good TB is still a TB and a good WB is BETTER! in most people's eyes.
    Absolutely this.
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #68
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    Oct. 3, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satin Filly View Post
    While I loved this article, I have to admit a few comments had me thinking "Oh come on...seriously?!"...the OTTB stereotypes are killing me in this article! The PRO had the working student get on first, why?...Oh because he's off the track so he must be crazy...I'll let you be the test dummy!
    Then has a blood workup done....why?! "He's just WAY TOO QUIET for a OTTB, he must not be feeling well!"

    Anyone who is astonished that OTTBs take so well to being clipped, bathed, groomed, mane pulled, etc clearly has no idea what a typical day at the track is like for these horses.

    Anywho...props to a BNR/BNT for giving a OTTB a try and here's to hoping more of them will jump on the 'band wagon'!
    Agree on all points. Thoroughbreds off the track have much more training and handling than most people give them credit for. I bristled at her comments, even at her insistence on giving him 30 days to let down, as if that were some kind of racetrack quarantine.

    Cupcake, er, meupatdoes, gave me some really good advice when I bought my OTTB and asked how long they need to unwind, and she said something like as long as it takes to get from the trailer to the crossties.

    Anyone with experience should be able to read a horse. Heck, almost any horse has bad days when they need a lunge first or just need a turn out, and you can usually tell before you hop on. So what language did they think he was speaking when he told them repeatedly that he was so settled?
    A helmet saved my life.

    2014 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #69
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    Jun. 21, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caravale View Post
    Agreed.

    This board is almost backward-elitist toward the Thoroughbred. Yeah, I get it, TBs can be great, TBs get incentive programs, TBs need homes because they failed at the track, TBs aren't crazy, TBs are better than Warmbloods, TBs are smarter, TBs are the bestest ever, my TB is just ALWAYS mistaken for a Warmblood which I just find so highly offensive, TB TB TB. Did we mention TB!?

    It's enough to drive some people AWAY from the TB...

    Why can't a good horse just be a good horse and leave it at that?
    The OTTB Mafia does not seem to 'get' that they are getting to be annoying. And in the process, alienating people who might otherwise be on their side.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #70
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    Oct. 1, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satin Filly View Post
    While I loved this article, I have to admit a few comments had me thinking "Oh come on...seriously?!"...the OTTB stereotypes are killing me in this article! The PRO had the working student get on first, why?...Oh because he's off the track so he must be crazy...I'll let you be the test dummy!
    Then has a blood workup done....why?! "He's just WAY TOO QUIET for a OTTB, he must not be feeling well!"

    Anyone who is astonished that OTTBs take so well to being clipped, bathed, groomed, mane pulled, etc clearly has no idea what a typical day at the track is like for these horses.
    Um.

    Jen's father is Ron Alfano, farrier and racehorse trainer. She more or less grew up riding racetrack culls. I think her equitation horse, Carebear, was an OTTB (and a hot, quirky one, at that).

    I think, as previously noted, the quotes used may not have been entirely in context.
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #71
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    Nov. 13, 2004
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    If I put a young horse through a bunch of life changes, including a hormone change with Dr. Snip-snip, and then started it on a career change too, I'd expect it to be a bit of a dork about its life too. TB, WB, half-yak.

    Handsome guy and I'm sure he's lovely, since he came from Rodney Jenkins!
    "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep."
    - Harry Dresden

    Horse Isle 2: Legend of the Esrohs LifeCycle Breeding and competition MMORPG



  12. #72
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    Oct. 12, 2005
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    I've been around long enough to reme,ber when the thoroughbreds were the be all and end all of the hunter ring. Then came the invasion of the warmblood and those that owned them were not exactly hesitant in expressing their opinions on how supremely superior their warmbloods were. From beimg highly sought after and high prices it reached the point you could hardly give a thoroughbred away. So please forgive those who feel elated and justified that their beloved thoroughbreds are comimg back imto vogue. After all, they've spent the past couple decades looked down upon because they only had thoroughbreds. And yes, there certainly is room for both.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  13. #73
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    Feb. 18, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sing Mia Song View Post
    Um.

    Jen's father is Ron Alfano, farrier and racehorse trainer. She more or less grew up riding racetrack culls. I think her equitation horse, Carebear, was an OTTB (and a hot, quirky one, at that).

    I think, as previously noted, the quotes used may not have been entirely in context.
    Agreed, I think they were mostly tongue-in-cheek.

    Like, yes, they had bloodwork done on him, but I really doubt it was because he was too quiet—it was probably done just as a general precaution (e.g., is the horse anemic?), as they would have done with any horse oddly quiet, warmblood or Thoroughbred.



  14. #74
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    Mar. 13, 2003
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    I agree that this was a nice piece not exactly meant for the nit-picking that goes on here. I liked it, I was glad to see it, and I agree 100% that while the people who go on about the superiority of the TB to the WB are annoying, they are simply the other side of the "WBs are always better than TBs" group (also annoying).

    What is nice is when someone who has the time and skills can take a horse off the track and bring out the best in it. That does take more time, often, than starting from scratch and it is fabulous that more trainers and owners are interested in doing this. A good horse is a good horse, but sometimes it takes a bit more effort to find and polish the diamond in the rough.

    I have a truly gorgeous, old school TB who looks like an underfed llama when not in work, and a young WB who always looks beautiful and striking, in work or not. Those who see past the surface see what my TB is- athletic, scopey, elegant- but it takes an experienced eye when the picture is clouded by no topline and that llama neck. Even when he is in work and has a nice topline and has filled out behind his withers my TB looks sort of plain until he gets moving. I am used to people commenting on how special my baby horse is even if he's just standing around, but it isn't until we get moving and they see his suspension, grace, and athleticism in action that they begin to be interested in my TB.
    You can take a line and say it isn't straight- but that won't change its shape. Jets to Brazil



  15. #75
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Oh good grief - everyone is nuts, making mountains out of molehills, and taking all of this waaaaay too personally! Jen Alfano got what sounds like a nice, young, quiet, OTTB. Not especially newsworthy, if you ask me. I'm glad that it sounds like she acquired a nice horse, and I'm glad for whatever good it does for the breed, but I'm not sure what the big story is here.

    Jen had her working student get on a recently gelded young horse that just had 30 days off and she warned him to be careful? Stop the presses!!!

    And, sorry, but I think some people are just looking to be offended if they find this article offensive. Jen didn't come to your barn and call your warmblood dumb, and I really doubt she, of all people, is intending to warmblood bash.

    Maybe I'm just crabby today, but I don't understand all of the hand wringing going on here.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  16. #76
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    Oct. 29, 2000
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    Quote Originally Posted by ponymom64 View Post
    I would get another TB in a heartbeat but I would only buy one that I could see jump before I purchased it - I'm not in a position to take a chance on something that doesn't jump well, I'm sure there are others that would give them a chance as well, but have the same issue as I do.....
    I bought OTTB's from the track for years and I never bought a BAD jumper (some were better then others, of course, but every one got their forearms horizontal). I would do this easy little test: Stand in front and with your fingers clasped behind the knee, slowly pull the forearm forward and up. The point at which you feel real resistance is the extent of their natural range of motion; this is the best you can expect over an average fence.

    Here are 3 of my favorite OTTB's. The top two I bought off the track, using this test (the bottom one is also an OTTB, but he was jumping when I got him):


    http://i394.photobucket.com/albums/p...ig3hunters.jpg
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."


    5 members found this post helpful.

  17. #77
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    Feb. 18, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Helpus View Post
    Here are 3 of my favorite OTTB's. The top two I bought off the track, using this test (the bottom one is also an OTTB, but he was jumping when I got him):


    http://i394.photobucket.com/albums/p...ig3hunters.jpg
    Yum. Love them all. Top right is my personal fav.


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  18. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Helpus View Post
    I bought OTTB's from the track for years and I never bought a BAD jumper (some were better then others, of course, but every one got their forearms horizontal). I would do this easy little test: Stand in front and with your fingers clasped behind the knee, slowly pull the forearm forward and up. The point at which you feel real resistance is the extent of their natural range of motion; this is the best you can expect over an average fence.

    Here are 3 of my favorite OTTB's. The top two I bought off the track, using this test (the bottom one is also an OTTB, but he was jumping when I got him):


    http://i394.photobucket.com/albums/p...ig3hunters.jpg
    Wow, that sure is a nice tip. I'm going to have to try that!
    "One reason why horses are happy is because they are not trying to impress other horses."
    "Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear, or a fool from any direction"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #79
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    Dec. 6, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    There's a reason this video (VHS!) costs around $300 to buy used on ebay or other auction sites.

    They really need to re-release it in DVD.

    I was browsing for field boots and saw that one was just listed a bit cheaper.....

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Selecting-Hu...item1c300b8475
    "And my good dreams? They all come with a velvet muzzle and four legs. All my good dreams are about horses."--In Colt Blood

    COTH Barn Rats Clique!



  20. #80
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    Jan. 27, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by TatteredDaydreamer View Post
    I was browsing for field boots and saw that one was just listed a bit cheaper.....

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Selecting-Hu...item1c300b8475
    Thanks! Rel6pointed out one on Anazon for $50. I ordered it and so far so good, however the last time I found one for under $100, the seller cancelled the transaction. I'm crossing my fingers I will actually get th tape this time...and that it will be in decent shape. Just when I decided to get rid of all my VHS.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



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