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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 20, 1999
    Posts
    537

    Default Do you know what top hunter rider has an OTTB in the barn?



    16 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2002
    Location
    Cow County, MD
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    You have no idea how happy I am to see this!
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2008
    Posts
    257

    Default

    Great, just about the time my daughters first, nice WB is ready to show. Typical, day late and a dollar short. That being said, a lovely horse is a lovely horse, no matter what the breed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2002
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    Former Long Islander now in the middle of the Great Lakes
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    1,650

    Default

    We'll see them in the TIP classes I hope...



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2006
    Posts
    3,961

    Default

    So how does the common person find an R.J.? Sounds awesome!
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2012
    Location
    Blythewood, South Carolina
    Posts
    98

    Default

    This makes me so happy! I've always been a TB girl and after having one for almost 2 years I can't even tell you how many people have stopped and asked if my mare was a WB. It's funny.
    I remember having a group of girls stop me in the schooling ring asking what breed she was, and I told them TB and they dropped their jaws because they didn't know .. TB's can get into a frame..
    REALLY? really. "She has to be a WB, she's in a frame." Right...
    Of course then they asked her price, LOL Not for sale!
    Save The Date 08-15-2011


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,283

    Default

    STD (ahahahhahahaa) -- I was also informed that my Appendix QH MUST be a warmblood because "nothing else could have a trot that springy!"

    ETA -- Read the article and I'm thoroughly puzzled as to why the author was so "shocked" at her horse's demeanor. She said she'd had horses from the track before -- they are ridden, schooled, clipped, bathed, groomed, and around tons of activity every day all day. Why expect him to act like an idiot? Mine raced for three years with a good trainer - I would have been shocked if he HADN'T been completely fine with such things.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2012
    Posts
    171

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ParadoxFarm View Post
    So how does the common person find an R.J.? Sounds awesome!
    I just got one. He just turned 6 and did 3.5 years on the track. Ran his last race Dec. 23rd. He acts like a 25 yr old school horse. I mean he has his issues, but his laid back, whatever attitude is so atypical of what you hear about I too thought something must be wrong. But the vet said nope, you just got a good one!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2002
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,163

    Default

    Awesome! My oldest daughter has informed me that she is getting a TB when she moves on from her large pony. She wants to do the hunter derbies.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    229

    Default

    SO happy to see this! I was lucky enough to work at a top sales barn in the early 2000s - the lady used to ride jumpers, broke her back, and started a sales barn. She sold to BNTs coast-to-coast - and had a true eye for amazing OTTBs. She said it took her a few years and some mistakes, but the number one thing she looked for was a good mind. I would come to ride and have a list of names and many were brand new. NONE were evil or psycho - NONE! I'd run them loose in their tack first, since there was no turnout, they'd all take a bit to play varying degrees, then would turn and look at me - the barn owner told me to do this before I ever heard of NH and "joining up" - she said when they look at you, they're ready to work.

    Anyway, I used my years riding there to find my own OTTB in TX that I fully intended to sell - but yeah, she's still with me eight years later. She was 4 when I got her and had been turned out at the trainer's farm, and when we did the vet check, we asked if she could be drugged because she was just so calm - but she noticed everything, so vet said, nope, just her. I rode her in a hunter pace in TX 4 months later! No lunging, just unload, hop on, and go on the trails on the buckle. A porcupine crossed the trail, and she just stopped and craned her head to see what that THING was! Curious George, totally calm, and easy-peasy. One time we were going to ride in a pasture for a hack, and someone's border collies had escaped their yard. The two dogs crouched and RAN straight at us. My then 5 year old OTTB mare stood her ground and let me yell "GIT!" at those dogs! Not only is she calm, but she places well in good company at any shows we attend - she's a lovely mare all around, and definitely NOT for sale!

    I love hearing that even more top riders are seeing, yet again, that TBs are not psycho, and they are so wonderfully EASY to ride - they actually learn and try! Just hope the popularity doesn't up the prices!!! HA!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
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    11,482

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    I sure wish that people who write about their nice TBs would do it without feeling the need to put the WBs down.

    It’s been a while since I’ve had a Thoroughbred, and it’s easy to see that they really are smarter. They retain everything they learn, and they start each day where they finish the day before. Sometimes with a warmblood, every day is like they’ve never done it before.
    I've had lovely TBs, and some that were tough. I've had lovely WBs, and some that were tough. I don't think their aptitude for training was somehow intrinsically linked to what breed they were. I currently have a TB who is an (aging) rockstar and a WB who is similarly fabulous. Both good athletes with super brains.

    A nice horse is a nice horse.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


    19 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2002
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    6,170

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildlifer View Post
    STD (ahahahhahahaa) -- I was also informed that my Appendix QH MUST be a warmblood because "nothing else could have a trot that springy!"

    ETA -- Read the article and I'm thoroughly puzzled as to why the author was so "shocked" at her horse's demeanor. She said she'd had horses from the track before -- they are ridden, schooled, clipped, bathed, groomed, and around tons of activity every day all day. Why expect him to act like an idiot? Mine raced for three years with a good trainer - I would have been shocked if he HADN'T been completely fine with such things.


    I thought that was funny too - racehorses have their mane pulled, ears clipped, etc. They also canter on the left leads going around the turns and then coming into the straight away they...gasp...do an auto change.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2008
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    941

    Default

    I love this!!! He is a nice looking horse too.

    I don't have one right now, but I used to have an OTTB (that actually won several races!) and he was a FABULOUS hunter and was dead quiet...nothing phased him! Not to mention he had a killer jump. This just makes me smile!
    Quote Originally Posted by rustbreeches View Post
    [George Morris] doesn't always drink beer, but when he does, he prefers Dos Equis



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2004
    Location
    Ct
    Posts
    2,646

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    A nice horse is a nice horse, absolutely! But I think that many people have misconceptions of TB's based on some naughty ones that they have seen and also, the BNT train of thought that if it doesn't come from Europe it's POS!

    I would get another TB in a heartbeat but I would only buy one that I could see jump before I purchased it - I'm not in a position to take a chance on something that doesn't jump well, I'm sure there are others that would give them a chance as well, but have the same issue as I do.....



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,693

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ParadoxFarm View Post
    So how does the common person find an R.J.? Sounds awesome!
    They are all over the back of the race tracks, especially if you are looking for the 3' amateur show ring.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2001
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    6,879

    Default

    Just looked him up on Pedigree Query: not surprising that he's pretty—he was a $600,000 yearling! http://www.pedigreequery.com/royal+straight4


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2009
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    South Central: Zone 7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucassb View Post
    I sure wish that people who write about their nice TBs would do it without feeling the need to put the WBs down.



    I've had lovely TBs, and some that were tough. I've had lovely WBs, and some that were tough. I don't think their aptitude for training was somehow intrinsically linked to what breed they were. I currently have a TB who is an (aging) rockstar and a WB who is similarly fabulous. Both good athletes with super brains.

    A nice horse is a nice horse.
    I would actually agree with the article (when talking in generalities), though I more so think that thoroughbreds seem smarter as youngsters, not necessarily as adults, as they mature more quickly than a warmblood. Then throw in the fact that most thoroughbreds come off the track at a young age and therefor have had far more exposure to lots of different environments than a warmblood of similar age, it's not hard to see why they may seem (or actually be) more intelligent as a youngster.

    However, once they are mature (talking 6-7 and up), I don't think that they are necessarily smarter. Some yes, some no.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,359

    Default

    Its not TB vs. Warmblood, its "OTTB"s that are being referred to here. Ones that are broke as yearlings, raced at 2, stabled with little or no turnout, clipped, bathed, used to everything under the sun. I had one who was still doing the 3' hunters on the A circuit at 27.

    I have had warmbloods, thoroughbreds (untrained/raced), and OTTB's. Loved them all, but its the OTTB's who have been pretty much bombproof from day 1.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,482

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SquishTheBunny View Post
    Its not TB vs. Warmblood, its "OTTB"s that are being referred to here. Ones that are broke as yearlings, raced at 2, stabled with little or no turnout, clipped, bathed, used to everything under the sun. I had one who was still doing the 3' hunters on the A circuit at 27.

    I have had warmbloods, thoroughbreds (untrained/raced), and OTTB's. Loved them all, but its the OTTB's who have been pretty much bombproof from day 1.
    That wasn't the way I interpreted the statement I quoted from the article:

    It’s been a while since I’ve had a Thoroughbred, and it’s easy to see that they really are smarter. They retain everything they learn, and they start each day where they finish the day before. Sometimes with a warmblood, every day is like they’ve never done it before.
    (emphasis added.)

    Now, maybe that isn't what the author intended, but the quote above doesn't indicate to me that she's talking about whether the horse is off the track or if they bombproof. I read that as very simply the author stating that TBs are easier to train.

    Hey, maybe that's been her experience, and everyone has an opinion.

    I just happen to disagree, and find the "reverse discrimination" (WB=dumblood) just as stupid as saying that all TBs are nut jobs.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


    3 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,359

    Default

    LucassB, meant to quote hntrjmprpro45 I had a thoroughbred who didnt race who was scared of his own shadow. I think its the racing atmosphere that can really desensitize any horse, regardless of breed.
    .
    I had a really dumb warmblood, and I have one now who is TOO smart....she should be a wonderful horse to break, but Im sure she will have my number once she is more confident in her under saddle life.

    My point was not about "breed vs breed" rather than the atmosphere where they grew up. I dont think any breed is easier to train than another, its about how they are raised, their natural willingness and their environment. Most warmbloods dont grow up in a super busy environment, yet some that start their show careers as youngsters do. The nice thing about OTTB's is that most of them are already VERY exposed to many things young non race horses are not.



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