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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2013
    Posts
    6

    Default Stallion at 8 weeks old??

    Hi. My Dutch Warmblood colt is only 8 weeks old but has the BEST textbook serving technique, standing absolutely vertical on his tippy toes no less! When he's finished with mum, he hops off and runs calling to check out the mare next door! The thoroughbred stud farm owner says she's never seen anything like him. That being said, he has the sweetest temperament and never kicks or tries to bite people; I take me three year old daughter into him often and he has walked around his paddock with her toys on his back. My question is, should I be considering an early gelding for this black beauty? How early can I geld him without growing a weed? He is bred to be compact and powerful, a bouncy Dutch ball, and I don't want him to turn into a "Hanoverian"! Beautiful as a they are, if that's what I wanted I could have bred for that shape. Any advice?
    Last edited by 6Levade6; Feb. 8, 2013 at 06:44 AM. Reason: Wrong terminology



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2011
    Posts
    638

    Default

    Colts rearing up at their moms and other horses is perfectly normal. Part of it is just play, part of it is instinctive practice for the future, but at 8 weeks old, rest assured he is waaay too young to actually accomplish anything. While it varies depending on the animal, male horses generally don't reach puberty and the ability to actually impregnate a mare until they're a year to a year and a half old.

    If you have every intention for him to be a gelding, as long as both his "boys" have dropped, he can be cut at any time. The earlier the better, as it will help keep him from starting to develop stallion tendencies. While this might make him grow a bit more than if he were to stay a colt (stallion), he will still stay within range that genetics already dictate. Good luck with your little guy! They're a hoot when they're that age.
    "...That's the worst, I think. When the secret stays locked within not for want of a teller, but for want of an understanding ear." --Stephen King


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,840

    Default

    It's definitely not a sexual act but if he doesn't need his testicles there is no reason to keep them now.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4,058

    Default

    If he is not a "Hanoverian" he isn't going to turn into one. Look at his lines and that is what he will be
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2010
    Posts
    605

    Default

    Seriously?


    8 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    2,094

    Default

    Personally I wouldn't worry a bit about him rearing up on his mom. That's normal. Having raised WB and TB foals side by side for a while, I will say that WB foals do tend to stand on their hind legs more than TB foals, not as a bad habit but just because they tend to carry themselves more on their hind end to begin with. As long as your baby learns that it is socially unacceptable for him to do this around humans, you are fine. At this point, this is not a hormonal behavior and there is no reason to geld him more quickly than you otherwise would. And yes, a single WB foal can really stand out in a herd of TBs!

    I will say, though, that I think it is a mistake to take your three year old in with your mare and foal. No matter how sweet or well behaved they are, foals can be quick and unpredictable and can occasionally have an unexpected bratty moment or suddenly get the idea that they want to play rough. I'm sure there are others that feel differently about the matter.

    Your foal sounds beautiful, though, congratulations!


    7 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2003
    Location
    Mayerthorpe, AB
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    I did have a colt a few years ago do the same thing at 3 months old. He was VERY close to doing the deed (he was a big colt and she was a smaller paint mare) and was actually ejaculating down my mare's side (not his dam). Didn't help she was a hussy! Anyways, he was soaking wet with sweat he was trying so hard and so worked up over this mare I promptly separated tham and had him gelded. Cured the problem very quickly and no more problems. But I had NEVER in the past seen a colt that frantic about a mare at such a young age!
    Cindy's Warmbloods
    www.cindyswarmbloods.com Cindy's Warmbloods
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    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2013
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thank you.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2013
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thank you! Yes he is beautiful, and I will enjoy!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2013
    Posts
    6

    Default

    I have read in other forums that early gelding can result in male foals growing taller and lankier and "slabby" through the body. I bred the dam, and I chose the colt's sire to preserve the conformation which I personally value. I was just wondering how much influence on body shape early gelding has.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2013
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Hi Bee Honey, re "I will say, though, that I think it is a mistake to take your three year old in with your mare and foal. No matter how sweet or well behaved they are, foals can be quick and unpredictable and can occasionally have an unexpected bratty moment or suddenly get the idea that they want to play rough. I'm sure there are others that feel differently about the matter.", thank you so much for your kind reply, I just want to make it clear that, apart from experiencing the wonder of his birth and the hours after, a very special thing, my little human is always safely in the arms of an adult around horses.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,956

    Default

    Think of it this way.
    People usually choose a stallion (or should) based on the stallion's offspring. So if the stallion is prepotent, you can tell the offspring whether it is a mare, gelding or stallion. That means the body type is not that dependent on hormones for type. Stallions do look different but if the sires type is consistent, you should get that type without the testosterone. Plus many stallions do not thicken up till they are 4 and I doubt you want to wait that long. Was looking at the stallions at the KWPN selection and it was not obvious that most of them were stallions.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2013
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thanks Stoicfish, that's very helpful advice.



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