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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Zone 6
    Posts
    1,903

    Default MUD :(

    There's nothing I hate more. I'd rather have extreme heat, a foot of snow, anything but this nasty sticky mud. Makes me so cranky

    Anyone have tips or tricks, anything you've done anywhere around the farm to deal with this menace...
    Oh my god - she's gone and got the eventing bug! I will send you some antibiotics! Take the entire bottle and do two hunter shows and it will pass!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2007
    Location
    Zone IV/Area III
    Posts
    1,215

    Default

    No tips here, but I share your pain...I'm down in MS and it is miserable



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    269

    Default

    Are you trying to control the mud situation in a specific area (i.e., in front of the barn, in a run-in) or are you just saying in general what are you doing to manage muddy pastures/farms?
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Zone 6
    Posts
    1,903

    Default

    In general I suppose. The areas around my gates are horrible though. Getting to the manure pile is a challenge as well.

    We also did a lot of excavation work last year and never got a chance to get grass growing on it so those areas are pretty bad too.

    I just hate this stuff
    Oh my god - she's gone and got the eventing bug! I will send you some antibiotics! Take the entire bottle and do two hunter shows and it will pass!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2011
    Location
    Cynthiana KY (~40 min. NE of Lexington)
    Posts
    560

    Default

    Another mud hater here. I agree, I'd rather snow than mud

    I've always heard (and found) that stone and lots of it is the best.And preferably with barrier cloth underneath. But we rent a barn right now and I refuse to put that much money into someone else's farm. What I've found works for a short term solution is carpet. Sounds silly, I know, but it really does work. In the past, I got big pieces that they've torn out from carpet installers and put around my gates and in front of the run in shed. Works like a charm for up to two years depending on your horses. Mine are mostly barefoot, so not as much wear and tear as ones with shoes.

    Sheila
    Sheila Zeltt
    Chestnut Run Stable & Zeltt Racing Stable
    www.Zeltt.com
    Standing "Tiz Brian" at Stud, 16.1 h bay TB by Tiznow


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2006
    Posts
    4,192

    Default

    I would have to agree with Chestnut Run. Lots of gravel. The barrier cloth is a great idea, too.
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 27, 2011
    Location
    My Little Bit of Heaven
    Posts
    249

    Default

    Excavate down at least 18" put in rock then gravel. Quick temporary fix; pea gravel.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2013
    Location
    Orange County, NY
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky Boy View Post
    There's nothing I hate more. I'd rather have extreme heat, a foot of snow, anything but this nasty sticky mud. Makes me so cranky

    Anyone have tips or tricks, anything you've done anywhere around the farm to deal with this menace...
    I've been researching soil stabilization grids.

    http://www.ecoterr.com/equine-footin...separation.htm

    http://www.geoproducts.org/

    http://www.stabiligrid.com/

    http://eco-flex.com/products/index.php?productId=31



    I don't have a mud problem but I have a few choice areas I would like to use these products and I would love to hear if any other horse people have used them.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,929

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hudsonhunter View Post
    I've been researching soil stabilization grids.

    http://www.ecoterr.com/equine-footin...separation.htm

    http://www.geoproducts.org/

    http://www.stabiligrid.com/

    http://eco-flex.com/products/index.php?productId=31


    I don't have a mud problem but I have a few choice areas I would like to use these products and I would love to hear if any other horse people have used them.
    Do you have cost per sq. foot? What are you learning? Just wondering how they compare both cost-wise and satisfaction with mud control vs. digging down, using geotextile and bringing in rock.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Posts
    4,050

    Default

    I purchased some very large heavy stall mats for another project, but put them down as a path in high traffic areas when we had freezing weather and the mud was rutted up, looked very uncomfortable to walk on.

    Since the thaw, and then cataclysm that followed, I just left them there and the horses are thrilled with their rubber "path" and use it exclusively. I think this is the first year ever that mud is basically a non-issue. Water pooling on the mats? Yes, but no slippy sucky mucky mud.

    I board, so the nice thing is I can take the mats with me should I ever need to, unlike footing.
    Worry is the biggest enemy of the present... it’s like using your imagination to create things you don’t want.
    Click for the ideal stocking stuffer for anyone equine!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2011
    Posts
    898

    Default

    I would love to try this

    http://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplies...oductId=440545

    Actually, I would love for that to work!! I've seen something similar on a grass lot used for parking and it was working quite well. But at $275 + $150 shipping, I'mnot going to gamble...



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,560

    Default

    Ugg, I feel you pain! I hate mud!!!!

    I am a boarder – last boarding barn undertook a very ambitious grading project last summer – meaning all we had was acres of raw dirt come winter rains. The place turned into an absolute nightmare of a mud pit. A boot sucking, can’t make it to the barn without slipping and cursing disaster.

    So, I got the hell out of there! I think they are looking at a few years before the dirt properly settles, and grass can really establish.

    I can tell you my new barn, while built on the same topography (base of a large hill / ravine, so lots of water comes running off the mountains) is totally mud free. They have HUGE drainage ditches around all perimeters. The arena / barns / paddocks are all built on a gentle slope down to drainage ditches. And rock, tons and tons of drainage rock covered in fine gravel. Even the turn out pastures fair well with the rains – the gates are located at the highest points, the fields slope away from there – and each is again surrounded by a drainage ditch.

    So the answer – grading, base rock, and well planned gate locations – not an easy fix!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2012
    Posts
    519

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chestnut Run View Post
    What I've found works for a short term solution is carpet. Sounds silly, I know, but it really does work. In the past, I got big pieces that they've torn out from carpet installers and put around my gates and in front of the run in shed. Works like a charm for up to two years depending on your horses. Mine are mostly barefoot, so not as much wear and tear as ones with shoes.

    Sheila
    I'm on a rented property as well and am battling never-ending mud. Do you happen to have any suggestions for how to go about contacting someone regarding old carpeting? I don't even know where to begin with that but it's a great idea. Do you have any pictures of it on your property?



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    500

    Default

    we have someone come out with a bobcat and remove the mud when it gets all mixed in with the manure - over the last three years that we've been here, a significant amount of "new" soil has been "made", and when it rains, it's AWFUL. So we got a LOT of it taken out of the paddocks. Once that was done, we put down lots of gravel in the areas the horses stand (which is right next to the hay bale feeders), and put rubber mats down. We clean the manure off the mats once or twice a week depending on the weather, and it keeps them from having to stand in mud and muck and nastiness. It helps, but isn't a permanent solution. Just don't have the money to put into a bunch of sand rock right now, especially for 8 paddocks.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2011
    Location
    Cynthiana KY (~40 min. NE of Lexington)
    Posts
    560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TBPONY View Post
    I'm on a rented property as well and am battling never-ending mud. Do you happen to have any suggestions for how to go about contacting someone regarding old carpeting? I don't even know where to begin with that but it's a great idea. Do you have any pictures of it on your property?
    I'll look to see if I have any pictures saved where you can see the carpet. But I don't think I do. After a week or two, it's got dirt tracked on it, and unless you look closely, you can't really see that it's carpet. We put down as big a pieces as we could (like 12'x12+'). I don't know that it would work well with smaller pieces as they might move around.

    I have a brother in law who installs carpets, so we just asked him. The lady who told me about using carpet for cheapy short term mud control, said she called some local apartment complexes and looked up local places that sold carpet. They usually do installations too. She said after a few weeks, she had people calling her to offer her old carpet. The installers have to pay to dispose of it, so she had a never ending supply of whatever she needed. I will say, her farm had absolutely NO mud anywhere. And this is clay central.

    Sheila
    Sheila Zeltt
    Chestnut Run Stable & Zeltt Racing Stable
    www.Zeltt.com
    Standing "Tiz Brian" at Stud, 16.1 h bay TB by Tiznow



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2000
    Posts
    3,149

    Default

    Fixing to dump gravel in a slew of dif locations on the farm. I don't remember ever having so much mud...it's everywhere and it just seems to NEVER dry out this year. UGH!!! Form a support group for us, Sparky Boy!!! Mud Haters, Inc.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    500

    Default

    I'm totally going to look up some carpet places and do this....methinks it would help out a lot long term.....



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