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  1. #41
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    Sep. 24, 2009
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    Roasted Cauliflower !

    Remove the 'flower' parts from the central stem. Cut large ones in 1/2 or 1/4 so they are about the same size.

    Toss with a little olive oil, s&p, thyme, and a big pinch of sugar.

    Preheat oven with a cookie sheet in the oven to 425. Put the prepped cauliflower on the hot cookie sheet, and roast about 30-40 minutes, stirring every so often, until the cauliflower is nicely browned and fairly tender.

    Now, you can eat this just like this - or toss with some hot cooked pasta, fresh baby spinach, a little olive oil and some freshly grated cheese.

    OR you can put the roasted cauliflower in a caserole dish, top with grated gruyere or emmentaller swiss (if I spelled those wrong, get over it LOL), then top with panko or fresh breadcrumbs and spray with some cooking spray. Pop this back into the oven for about 10 minutes until browned.

    If you don't like boiled cauliflower, you must try roasted. It gets very sweet and mellow and isn't like anything else.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #42
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    bought acorn squash...let y'all know how it turned out...
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  3. #43
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    Mar. 1, 2003
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    Happily in Canada
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    Even if you dislike squash/pumpkin (as I do), you might want to try butternut squash soup. I've lost my best recipe, so I kind of take a few from the internet and mix them together. Basically the magic ingredient is garam masala - an indian spice mix. The soup has a really nice mild curry/spice flavour. I like to add diced red peppers and/or frozen corn once the soup has been blended. You can also add cream, buttermilk, or plain yogurt as a garnish, which helps make it a bit milder.
    Blugal

    You never know what kind of obsessive compulsive crazy person you are until another person imitates your behaviour at a three-day. --Gry2Yng



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2000
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    9,273

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    Here are a few squash recipes -

    Sauteed Yellow Squash with Jalapeno
    Sautee sliced yellow squash with onions and chopped jalapeno pepper. Add a dash of soy sauce and salt and pepper to serve.

    For best flavor, fry a few bacon slices first, remove from pan and sautee vegetables in bacon drippings. Crumble bacon slices over top to serve.

    Broiled Squash with Radishes
    1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
    1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
    1 teaspoon chopped fresh dill
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
    1/2 cup chopped red onion
    1 large zucchini, cut in half lengthwise then into 1/4-inch slices
    1 large yellow squash, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
    4 radishes, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices

    1. Preheat broiler and set the oven rack about 6 inches from the heat source.

    2. Whisk together olive oil, vinegar, dill, salt, and pepper together. Add onion, zucchini, yellow squash, and radishes; toss until evenly coated.

    3. Spoon into an 8x8-inch baking dish, and cover with aluminum foil.

    4. Broil in the preheated oven 10 minutes, then remove the foil, and continue broiling until the vegetables are tender and nicely browned on top, about 10 minutes more.

    Serve alone or over quinoa as side dish.

    Glazed Butternut Squash
    3 pounds butternut squash, peeled*
    1/2 cup apple cider*
    1/4 cup water
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon sugar
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon pepper
    1/4 cup chopped toasted pecans
    1 tablespoon chopped fresh or 1 tsp. dried sage

    1. Cut squash in half lengthwise; remove and discard seeds. Cut each half into 4 wedges; cut wedges into 2-inch pieces.

    2. Stir together squash, 1/2 cup apple cider, and next 5 ingredients in a 12-inch, deep-sided, nonstick skillet over medium-high heat; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer, gently stirring occasionally, 25 minutes. Uncover and cook 5 minutes or until liquid thickens and squash is tender. Gently stir in pecans and sage until well combined.

    *3 lb. sweet potatoes may be substituted for butternut squash and 1/2 cup apple juice may be substituted for apple cider.

    I have more recipes but will have to look them up. We love squash - summer (yellow) squash, acorn squash, butternut squash, spaghetti squash. And since I am no longer allowed "green stuff" (I'm on Coumadin), squash and sweet potatoes have become real staples for us.



  5. #45
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    Nov. 5, 2000
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    And here is an okra recipe, which, alas, I can no longer have.

    Fried Pecan Okra
    1 cup pecans
    1 1/2 cups Bisquick or similar all-purpose baking mix
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon pepper
    2 (10-oz.) packages frozen whole okra, thawed, or 1 (16-oz.) package frozen cut okra, thawed.
    Peanut oil

    Place pecans in an even layer in a shallow pan. Bake at 350° for 10 minutes or until lightly toasted, stirring occasionally.

    Process pecans, baking mix, salt and pepper and next 2 ingredients in a food processor until pecans are finely ground. Place pecan mixture in a large bowl. Add okra, tossing to coat. Gently press pecan mixture into okra.

    Pour oil to a depth of 2 inches into a Dutch oven or cast-iron skillet; heat to 350°. Fry okra, in batches, turning once, 5 to 6 minutes or until golden; drain on paper towels.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
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    Guess what I'm snacking on right now? Kale chips! They're, um....interesting.

    After reading about them here, since I was at the store at lunch time I bought some kale, came home, and chipped away. 1) They're rather hearty. 2) I'll make them again. 3) But not THAT often. Maybe in a month. 4) I used sea salt but salted them way too much - will use less next time.

    I baked them at 350 F for 15 minutes on a cookie sheet lined with baking parchment.



  7. #47
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    May. 31, 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay Area
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    244

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    Zucchini is not a rare vegetable, but get yourself a julienne peeler and make zoodles! Zucchini noodles are fabulous as a replacement for regular spaghetti. I made pad Thai with zoodles that is delicious. I also toss them with marinara and have turkey meatballs and zoodles. Two minutes to peel, two minutes or less in the microwave, drain, toss with sauce.

    I just made cauliflower rice too that was great in a stir-fry. Mashed cauliflower is a great sub for potatoes.

    I think you have to get creative with common veggies too. It makes life easier.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
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    Dec. 29, 1999
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    Harrisburg, PA USA
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    Zoodles sound great. I'll try them next.

    I vote that this thread goes into Favorites. So many good ideas for winter vegetables. Great thread.



  9. #49
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Ok, I remembered why I didn't repeat the pumpkin pie made-from-scratch

    Cut the acorn squash up, kind of like I would a potato, tossed t with olive oil, salt, onion- and garlic powder, black pepper, Italian seasoning....

    Then I found the raw garlic, crushed 2 cloves...
    added a little butter, and let simmer, while I stuck the mild italian sausage under the broiler.

    It turned out alright. I could not find the curry, it would have gone well with the slightly sweet flavor I wasn't expecting...the sausage was good with it, even though I do prefer regular Bratwurst....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  10. #50
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    Nov. 5, 2000
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    This is a pretty tasty acorn squash recipe.

    Baked Acorn Squash with Maple Syrup
    2 acorn squash, cut in half lengthwise and seeded
    2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
    salt to taste
    2 tablespoons unsalted butter
    2 tablespoons maple syrup
    1 tablespoon brown sugar
    ground black pepper to taste
    1 pinch cayenne pepper

    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Score the squash by making 1/4-inch deep slashes into the flesh of the squash (I do it in a grid pattern). Place cut side up in baking dish. Brush with orange juice and sprinkle with salt. Bake until lightly browned, about 30 min.

    Meanwhile, simmer butter, maple syrup, brown sugar, black pepper, and cayenne pepper in a small skillet over medium heat until smooth and the sugar has dissolved, about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.

    Remove squash from oven. Pour out any liquid that may have collected in the squash. Brush the glaze over each squash half. Return to the oven and bake until until tender, about 20 more minutes. Spoon any glaze that has collected at the bottom of the squash over the edges of the squash. Season with additional salt, if desired.

    I have another recipe that is similar - uses brown sugar instead of maple syrup, but it is darned good, too.
    Last edited by DownYonder; Feb. 8, 2013 at 06:57 AM. Reason: clarification



  11. #51
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    Mar. 31, 2004
    Location
    Upper Peninsula, Michigan
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    Here's how I do spaghetti squash. Roast as above. :-)Shred. Then that day (or the next, or whenever)...Saute some delicious sweet vidalia onions in butter until soft and maybe a little caramelized. Add a bunch of minced garlic. Saute that until fragrant. Add some cut up tomatoes (I like fresh roma tomatoes) and the spaghetti squash. Saute until the liquid evaporates some (the tomatoes give off a LOT).Hit it up with some heavy cream (just a little bit to make it creamy), parmesan cheese (optional!), garlic powder, salt, pepper (freshly ground!), and maybe some sliced green onion.It's probably my favorite way to eat vegetables. You can obviously adjust to your taste. (Omit tomatoes, add mushrooms, etc.) I have just learned to do the onions FIRST and THEN add garlic or else by the time my onions are caramelized my garlic is starting to burn. But that is probably my lack of skills.



  12. #52
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    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
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    Beets- vegetarians answer to meat. Mmmm.
    Slice em, dip them in egg yolk, flip them in bread crumbs, fry em.

    Frozen creamed spinach (nuked) with balsamic rice (straight out of the rice maker).
    I can't cook, but I do love vegetables. I love my rice cooker, dump rice in, dump water in, flip switch. It never over or under cooks, stays perfect temperature.
    I do only use it with jasmine rice.

    I love this thread.



  13. #53
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    Jun. 7, 2002
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    I LOVE cauliflower!

    Separate it into "florets", steam it for 4 mn, and serve with melted butter, garlic and a dash of vinegar. YUM

    Or, after steaming it, put it in an oven safe dish with bacon and a nice cheese béchamel, and bake for 15 mn.


    I'm intrigued by the spaghetti squash. I've never tried it. Or the zoodles.
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



  14. #54
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chall View Post
    Beets- vegetarians answer to meat. Mmmm.
    Slice em, dip them in egg yolk, flip them in bread crumbs, fry em.
    Hmm...I LOVE beets but that does not sound very good. I wonder if I would like it in real life though.



  15. #55
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    Hmm...I LOVE beets but that does not sound very good. I wonder if I would like it in real life though.
    verything tasted good breaded and fried!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  16. #56
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    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Dutchess County, New York
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    I agree, this thread should go in Favorites! I'm always trying to eat more vegetables.

    I have two other standbys: sauteeing green beans on the stovetop in olive oil at high heat (so they eventually brown in spots) and adding a splash of soy sauce. Extremely easy, takes about 5 - 10 min. and kid-friendly.

    Creamed spinach/chard/beet greens: sautee onions and garlic in olive oil and butter. Add leafy greens, cook down, add a splash of heavy cream, add some parmesan cheese, stir. Phenomenally good!



  17. #57
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    what will it be today?

    It's raining and while not too cold, kind of nasty...I need something to warm the soul...
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  18. #58
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    Mar. 22, 2005
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    Where it is perpetually winter
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    I like to make spaghetti squash au gratin. It's really rich and delicious, especially on a cold day!

    Ingredients:
    1 (2 1/2 lb.) spaghetti squash
    sage
    1 garlic clove
    2 1/2 cups shredded gruyere cheese (or Swiss if you can't find gruyere)
    3/4 cup heavy cream
    salt and pepper to taste

    Preheat oven to 375. Puncture spaghetti squash then microwave on high for 10 minutes. Remove from microwave, cut in half lengthwise. Allow to cool for 5 minutes or so. (It just makes it easier to handle.) Scoop out the seeds. Use a fork to scrape the meat out of the squash. It should come out in spaghetti-like pieces. Grease bottom and sides of 9 x 13" pan. Mix "spaghetti" with 1/2 tsp. sage, 2 cups of the gruyere and the heavy cream. Spread in the bottom of the prepared pan. Spread the remaining 1/2 cup of cheese on top. Bake for 45 minutes. If the top is not golden brown, put under broiler for about 1 minute to brown it.



  19. #59
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    Nov. 12, 2001
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    Dry Ridge, KY USA
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    Another Asian vegetable that has not been mentioned is Bok Choy.

    I like to dice it into small pieces and sautee in olive oil, with a small pad of butter, salt and pepper. Yummy! Since it is also in the cabbage family, it is quite good for you. I do not like any other cabbage, so this is a good one for me.

    It goes well in any of the stir fry dishes that you have mentioned, too. If you make Won Ton soup, add some Bok Choy and it will really make the soup better.
    When in Doubt, let your horse do the Thinking!



  20. #60
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    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
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    We love greens, all greens... any possible way that includes butter. Kale, spinach, lettuce, bok choy (one of my favorites, it keeps growing if you just cut the leaves off and put the bottom in water).

    Kid love cabbage and brussels-if I roast a big pan of broccoli, cauliflower and brussel sprouts with garlic and butter the kids eat it like candy. Can't make enough-we always run out.

    We do yams (never buy sweet potatoes, always yams-and then we call them sweet potatoes lol) with ancho chile or hotter and spices. I'll either mash them or cut them into large chunks, butter, spices, garlic, salt and bake in a casserole dish until spuds are done. Love that.

    Anything that goes on or with potatoes or pasta I just as easily put over vegetables and nobody bats an eye. squash or cauliflower or whatever.

    Now I'm pondering the fried beets... sounds crazy but it just might work!



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