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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Default The challenge: Cook a Vegetable

    Ok, the paleo thing got me thinking...

    My repertoir is really restricted when it comes to vegetables.
    Even though my local store carries quiet a few different ones, some of them have me go

    So...I am challenging myself - and any of you, if you want - to find a vegetable I have not prepared yet and cook it.


    Maybe I can even remember to keep track of it...



  2. #2
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    Jan. 10, 2002
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    Area VIII, Region 2, Zone 5.
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    6,786

    Default

    Do you want some good, easy ways to prepare vegetables? I have a rutabaga soup that's out of this world. It requires a good bit of chopping, but the rest is simple.

    And THANK YOU for not referring to them as veggies. Ugh.
    Quote Originally Posted by Linny View Post
    Those martingales were so taut, you could play Ode to Joy on them with a comb


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2006
    Location
    NE OK
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    575

    Default

    roasted parsnips. cut up, toss in a little oil and salt, spread out on a cookie sheet in a 450 degree oven. toss them about every 10 minutes or so til they are tender, about 45 minutes or an hour, depending of size of pieces.
    Raw, they remind me of radishes. Cooked, they are lovely and sweet and far under-utilized.


    9 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2007
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    968

    Default

    Not sure what you're asking but if you haven't made brussel sprouts try this: Cut them in half, put some butter (ok, for me its alot of butter) in a saute pan, put all the sprouts face down sprinkle with salt and add a little bit of water, cover and steam for a bit then take the cover off, add more butter (can't help myself) and cook further until the bottoms are brown. yummy.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
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    4,144

    Default

    Have you cooked leeks? I saute them with garlic in olive oil and they are quite delicious.

    (FYI-- I only use the "bulb" end cut into coins, not the leafy end. I don't think that the leafy end is very edible.)


    ETA: Tinah, are parsnips supposed to taste a bit like dish soap? The one time I tried to cook them, they tasted like soap but I have no idea if that is normal or if it was just my sub-par cooking skills.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
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    4,687

    Default

    Shredded beet and carrot salad - no cooking necessary. Dress with lemon juice & olive oil, salt, and a pinch of sugar; or any oil & vinegar mixture you like. Whenever we make this we always wonder why we don't make it more often.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Default

    I am challenging myself to explore the unknown vegetable, smiling at me from the shelves at the store.

    I have tried Rutabega...might have to revisit that. Have never had parsnips. Gonna have to look into those.

    and I love brussle sprouts. Although, it's been a while since I last had them. (and that recipe sounds delicious, you use fresh or frozen?)

    recipes are ALWAYS welcome!

    I have not had squash or pumpkin much...Hikama is EXOTIC....well, you get the drift. Stepping outside the comfort zone of peas and carrots (I hate cooked carrots btw)



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2006
    Location
    NE OK
    Posts
    575

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ddashaq View Post
    Have you cooked leeks? I saute them with garlic in olive oil and they are quite delicious.

    (FYI-- I only use the "bulb" end cut into coins, not the leafy end. I don't think that the leafy end is very edible.)


    ETA: Tinah, are parsnips supposed to taste a bit like dish soap? The one time I tried to cook them, they tasted like soap but I have no idea if that is normal or if it was just my sub-par cooking skills.
    Hmm, not supposed to taste like dish soap, but they aren't nice at all boiled. I supposed if the oven wan't hot enough they would be mushy. . . .but no, no dish soap.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
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    4,136

    Default

    In the winter I roast a lot of vegetables; in the summer we grill them.

    Roast butternut squash is so easy (esp. if you can buy it peeled & cubed). Just toss in a roasting pan, dot with butter and sprinkle w/salt & pepper, roast at 425 for about 20 min. and done.

    I also like to roast beets (in their skins, wait until they are cool and the skins slip off), and put them on a bed of lettuces, dot with goat cheese and sunflower seeds, and drizzle with dressing.

    And my favorite salad dressing is: 1 cup olive oil, 1/2 cup WHITE balsalmic vinegar, 3 tablespoons (or maybe it's 6, I have to look it up) mustard. Shake. Done.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
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    6,201

    Default

    Try steaming parsnips and carrots together.

    Roast asparagus by spreading in shallow metal pan, sprinkling with salt, and spraying with Pam. 450 Deg. oven for about 10 minutes, according to taste.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2004
    Location
    Yonder, USA
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    2,561

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tinah View Post
    roasted parsnips. cut up, toss in a little oil and salt, spread out on a cookie sheet in a 450 degree oven. toss them about every 10 minutes or so til they are tender, about 45 minutes or an hour, depending of size of pieces.
    Raw, they remind me of radishes. Cooked, they are lovely and sweet and far under-utilized.
    I bought parsnips the other day to make this exact same recipe. Except I also add whole garlic cloves and rosemary.

    This same method works wonderfully for potatoes (white and sweet), winter squash, carrots, halved brussels sprouts, whole okra (won't be slimy!), and green beans (add a bit of fresh lemon zest--yum).

    It can be done on the grill (which is particularly nice for zuchini cut into thick planks and peppers), or at an oven temp between 400 and 450. Just make sure all pieces are coated with olive oil, they have space to lay flat on the baking sheet in the oven, and you flip each piece since the side touching the sheet is the one that gets brown and carmelized.

    ETA: I see others posted with similar experience while I was typing. Seriously, try this method for okra (and also green beans). People who thought they hated okra loved it prepared this way.
    ---------------------------



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
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    2,576

    Default

    Brussel Sprouts

    Heat oven to 375.

    Take whole FRESH brussel sprouts. Cut off a little bit on the bottom, remove a leaf or two. If you want to leave whole then cut an X on the bottom about 1/2". If you want them cut in half, then just cut in half lengthwise.

    Toss in bowl. Liberally add olive oil, salt, pepper.

    Spread on a lined cookie sheet - foil or parchment. Arrange if you like. Sprinkle with salt again, pepper if you want. Make sure they have enough olive oil on them. You can drizzle again if you want.

    Bake until they are browned really well. Stir every 10 minutes until they are the desired color. I like mine the color of a bay horse, but not a black horse.

    These need salt. Bake maybe 30-40 min, depends on your oven. You want them on the darker side.

    OR the skillet version:

    Take the brussel sprouts FRESH, cut off the end and put the slicing blade on the food processor and run them through. It will look fluffy. Get skillet add olive oil and when hot, toss in the brussel sprouts, saute them until really brown, then eat right away. Add salt and pepper. You can also use a big knife and thinly slice to get them thin.

    I sometimes cook in the toaster oven outside on the back porch. Remember add salt. I find I love a lot with a fair amount of salt on them. Kinda like popcorn or eggs, it needs salt. But use as you want. But to me, the more salt the better.

    Gonna cook some for lunch. YUM.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
    Location
    Rising Sun, MD
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    3,605

    Default

    I'm a big fan of tomatillos- using them to make a salsa verde or adding them along with roasted poblanos to ground turkey to make a green turkey chili.

    Artichokes are a good one too- roasted or steamed, or just the hearts added to a stir fry.

    How bout some fried green plantains? (Tostones)

    Broccoli rabe sauted with garlic and olive oil?
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    41,724

    Default

    Don't dismiss frozen veggies, they are many times more fresh, holding more of their vitamins from flash frozen when picked, than those sitting out there on a bin for days.

    I cook, lightly, a bag of frozen cauliflower in a bowl with a tablespoon of water or so.
    Then add salsa like Pace or Picante, some green olives and italian dressing and there you have it, makes two delicious meals.

    As a student in Europe, many meals on my own were boiled cabbage with a package of gravy mix.
    The equivalent of ramen noodles here when you don't have spare money to eat more.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2004
    Location
    Yonder, USA
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    2,561

    Default

    Kale, collards, mustard greens, turnip greens, etc. are great in stir-fry. Cut leaves into strips and cook just until wilted. Finish with a little soy sauce.

    Asparagus is also great stir-fried. Cut into matchsticks, cook until crisp-tender, and finish with soy sauce.

    Steam swiss chard and beet greens. Cut the stems into small pieces and the leaves into strips, put in a covered pot with a tiny bit of water, and steam just until wilted. Finish with plenty of salt and vinegar.
    ---------------------------


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2001
    Posts
    5,180

    Default

    Take rmh's recipe for brussel sprouts in the oven; do the same thing with sweet potatoes, and add a hearty dash of paprika or chile. Also works with squash.

    Lightly saute thin slices of eggplant, dress with a splash of the best balsamic vinegar you have and a drizzle of olive oil.

    Toss kale with salt and olive oil, lay out on cookie sheet and cook at 250-300 degrees until crispy. They'll be the best alternative to potato chips ever.

    Pesto! Take lots of fresh basil, run through food processor with dash of lemon and salt, handful of pine nuts, parmesan to your taste, and enough olive oil to make the consistency thick but not runny (think spaghetti sauce or a little thicker). You can add spinach or kale leaves into the processor at the same time, though I prefer straight basil. Use to toss with pasta, dress chicken, spoon over other veggies or fish, etc.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2012
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    157

    Default

    We love veggies here! For a change on mash, do half mash potato and half mashed celery root. It just lightens it and adds a lovely flavour.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
    Location
    Center of the Universe
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    7,042

    Default

    we have a really good Asian store here- I mean really authentic, as in the cashiers don't speak English and all of the labels on food are also not in any language I recognize (English, German, Spanish, and French are all I know; I briefly tried Russian, but it didn't stick).
    So for fun, sometimes I go into the produce section and select an item I have no idea what it is- they have A LOT of "veggies/fruits/who can tell" things for sale that are just not recognizable by me. Tells you a lot about how restricted our normal diets are.
    Then I take it home and try to figure out how to eat it.

    Kale fried crispy is absolutely incredible in flavor and texture, I highly recommend it. However, if you buy strange melon-like things from the Asian store, be sure to only cut them open outdoors, some of them smell really bad.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2011
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Kale Salad -

    Rinse kale and take the stems outs, cut it into thin 1/2 inch ribbons. Put into big bowl and add about a tablespoon of salt for every 12 or so big leaves of kale. Don't skimp on the salt. 'Massage' the kale in the bowl for 2 minutes or until it has shrunk in size by at least half.
    Put Kale in a new bowl- or drain and quick rinse the bowl- the liquid that "escapes" is a bitter.
    After this, add vinaigrette (recipe below) and thinly cut red onions and diced sweet peppers (red, orange, or yellow), stir in. The acidic vinaigrette will take the bite out of kale and onions, so i'd let it sit for a few minutes while you cut up and add the other ingredients. Chop up some sort of salty nut and some sort of tangy fruit, i use craisans and cashews. Spoon out... small pieces of a creamy goat cheese. I'd put about 5 spoonfuls of goat cheese per 12 leaves. Add cheese just before you serve.

    Vinaigrette (use about 2 tablespoons per 12 leaves of kale)
    half cup of lemon juice
    tablespoon of red wine vinegar
    tablespoon of olive oil
    teaspoon of balsamic vinegar
    teaspoon of dijon mustard.
    teaspoon of honey
    couple dashes of salt and pepper.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    5,147

    Default

    Nuked beets.

    1. Wash the beet.
    2. Stab the beet.
    3. Nuke the beet.
    4. Eat the beet.

    Beets are yummy all by themselves!

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).


    7 members found this post helpful.

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