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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2013
    Location
    Greenville Oh
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    15

    Default Transporting horses in to Florida

    I am going to compete in Fl in May. I am in Oh. I have a friend telling me how hard it is to get horses into FL. Mandatory stops at every weigh station to check paperwork and hay quality?
    Also does anyone know how much fuel adding a 1200 lb horse to trailer costs? He is trying to tell me it will cost me 2 miles per gallon for every horse. Thoughts please.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2003
    Location
    Hollywood, but not the one where they have the Oscars!
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    6,795

    Default

    You only have to stop at the entrance and exit to Fla. YOu must have a current coggins test and a current health certificate. We are in Ohio and our horses go back and forth all the time, not really a big deal.
    "You can't really debate with someone who has a prescient invisible friend"
    carolprudm


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    78

    Default

    You MUST pull into the Agricultural Inspection Station, located just inside the Florida border. Well marked. Health Certificate within 60 days and current Coggins. Do the same on your way back north. It's easy peasy!

    I emphasized "must" because if you drive right by they'll be on you like fleas on a hound dog. It's a real adrenaline rush to realize those flashing lights are for you!
    It's an even bigger pita to have to turn your rig around and drive back to the ag station with your escort - ask me how I know LOL
    HRMT


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    78

    Default Ag Station

    Oops dbl post
    Last edited by HorsesRMyTherapy; Feb. 6, 2013 at 08:42 PM. Reason: Fast fingers
    HRMT



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2010
    Posts
    1,644

    Default

    As others have said, only one stop right across the border. Make sure you have the *originals* of your coggins and health certificate. I believe health cert has to be within 30 days. As far as I know, they do not check your hay.

    As for your mileage question, too many variables here to advise you. Easiest thing to do is to fill up the tank on your tow vehicle, hook up trailer, load up horses, go for a drive to Dayton (or something! ) and keep track of the exact number of miles, and then fill up tow vehicle again. Divide the miles traveled by the gallons used and that will tell you your miles per gallon. You can then calculate how much gas you will need. Be aware that TN and KY are pretty hilly and that will make your mileage go down. But you will at least have an estimate.

    I hope you can take your own hay with you, and grain. Both hay and grain are MUCH more expensive in FL than Ohio. You can find good hay but you will pay a premium for it.


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    4,338

    Question

    Yes, you only stop at the ag station on the way in and on the way out, you need to have your Coggins within a year and a health cert within 30 days.

    They do not check the hay and grain that you bring with you and you do not have to stop at weigh stations unless you are in a commercial rig.

    The ag station isn't right at the border though, it is further south but I don't recall which mile marker. If you look on the FL state website (Google Ag Station) and the website will tell you.

    I am in the Tampa area and right now good T&A hay ranges from 14 - 18 a bale. Bring your own hay....
    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
    Bernard M. Baruch



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,238

    Default

    When I shipped my horse down here from IL, I actually didn't have the original copy of the Coggins--it was a "rush" order, as I was trying to get everything together so my horse could leave on the shipper's schedule (my friend had passed away and I was taking her horse, as there was nobody else to take him--it's not like I just left everything to the last minute). So, they had a copy of the Coggins, inlcuding the vet's cell # if there were any problems, but the ag. people accepted it without any questions. I kind of had these horrific visions of the shipper having to leave my horse @ the ag. station since he didn't have the original Coggins, lol, but I guess the ag. department is not *quite* as strict as they're made out to be. As long as you have a current Coggins (I believe it might have to be within the last 6 months?) and health cert., you should be fine.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2013
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    1,242

    Default

    You'll know when you are getting close to the Ag station because all the big rigs start moving over to the right. Look for the signs. They are hard to miss unless you are in "highway zone" mode. I guess they'll stop you, but I dropped a cow off in Georgia and didn't stop on the way back. No one pulled me over to verify my rig was empty. Maybe they recognized me?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2013
    Location
    Greenville Oh
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Thanks everyone. I had a feeling my friend was being a bit dramatic. He has a friend that takes camels into FL every year and I suspect they are a bit more tightly controlled than horses.
    I will work on the fuel thing. He only wants us to take two (1 each) for a 4day tournament and I don't want to be without a backup.
    If anyone in FL is curious this is the event
    http://www.knightsofmayhemultimatejoust.com/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2012
    Location
    Southeast US
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    Default

    I have driven past the inspection station several times with an empty stock trailer and never been chased down, but my sister once drove past with an empty horse trailer and they did come out and pull her over. But, since it was empty, she didn't have to go back, the guy just gave her a lecture about how you *always* have to stop no matter what.

    I think that maybe I pass by OK with the stock trailer because they can see that it's empty.


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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2002
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    5,090

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Knader View Post
    Thanks everyone. I had a feeling my friend was being a bit dramatic. He has a friend that takes camels into FL every year and
    Transporting camels does sound like good reason to be dramatic ... I can't wait to get home and check out your link! ... But ... what role do camels play?
    *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=
    Dressage becomes art when it is a joy for the horse. -KBH

    Mighty Thoroughbred Clique Now on Facebook ... ... show the loff



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
    Posts
    3,998

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NoSuchPerson View Post
    I have driven past the inspection station several times with an empty stock trailer and never been chased down, but my sister once drove past with an empty horse trailer and they did come out and pull her over. But, since it was empty, she didn't have to go back, the guy just gave her a lecture about how you *always* have to stop no matter what.

    I think that maybe I pass by OK with the stock trailer because they can see that it's empty.

    I was going to a show (in Florida) and passed them (private 3H trailer pulled by a dually so maybe looked commercial??) and they came chasing me - I never pulled over and they gave up - so maybe they figured out I wasn't headed for the border.
    Sandy in Fla.


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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HorsesRMyTherapy View Post
    You MUST pull into the Agricultural Inspection Station, located just inside the Florida border. Well marked. Health Certificate within 60 days and current Coggins. Do the same on your way back north. It's easy peasy!

    I emphasized "must" because if you drive right by they'll be on you like fleas on a hound dog. It's a real adrenaline rush to realize those flashing lights are for you!
    It's an even bigger pita to have to turn your rig around and drive back to the ag station with your escort - ask me how I know LOL
    LOL - Just an FYI - if you are coming down I-75, the ag station is not right over the border like the one on I-95, so keep an eye out, because it is some distance south of the FL/GA line. It is well marked. You must have a health certificate within 30 days and coggins for all horses in the trailer.
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4,043

    Default

    Val- why didnt you pull over?
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2012
    Posts
    689

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Valentina_32926 View Post
    I never pulled over and they gave up - so maybe they figured out I wasn't headed for the border.
    Uhhh, I would not ignore flashing blue lights behind me.......that's a bad game to play.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2010
    Posts
    1,644

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MunchkinsMom View Post
    LOL - Just an FYI - if you are coming down I-75, the ag station is not right over the border like the one on I-95, so keep an eye out, because it is some distance south of the FL/GA line. It is well marked. You must have a health certificate within 30 days and coggins for all horses in the trailer.
    You are right, but when you have been driving for 10 or more hours, it *seems* like it was right over the border! Everything was relative at that point!

    Anyhoo, it's true, you can't miss it.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2013
    Location
    Greenville Oh
    Posts
    15

    Default

    The camels are a different business. Our friend runs a rescue and gives camel rides at fairs. We are competing in the joust and working on logistics now



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 2, 2000
    Location
    Sussex, NJ
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    Default

    My husband makes several trips to and from Florida every year and he said that they have gotten more strict. But he said it also depends on who is working, because some people were tougher then others. Like making them unwrap horses to check markings, and really checking over each horse and paper work. While others barely even look at the horses or papers!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2009
    Posts
    2,908

    Default

    I shipped my horse down a couple times before permanently moving. The first time the commercial shipper said we had to redo health cert. because it had two different colors of ink - this was in 2008. (he knew the drill)Seemed to me like they are fussy about stuff that is not necessarily important. Check w/ your vet and see if they are familiar w/ Florida peculiarities when they do health certs. If yes, you should be OK. If no, find one that is to do the paperwork. Ive heard stories about people having to pull over, find a Fla. vet to recheck, adding HOURS to the trip.
    We don't get less brave; we get a bigger sense of self-preservation........



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2006
    Location
    Some Beach Somewhere
    Posts
    538

    Default

    While I know of rigs getting through with just a cursory check of the paperwork leaving the state I have also had inspectors enter trailers and make us take off fly masks to match horses to their paperwork. I would highly recommend making sure all paperwork meets the specific requirements coming and going. This includes making sure the newer electronic Coggins have been signed correctly by your vet (we had that issue when selling a horse). I have seen big commercial rigs and private rigs held for hours for paperwork not being exactly correct on one horse. If everything is in order according to the state regulations it should be an easy process.



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