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  1. #1
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    Jan. 2, 2006
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  2. #2
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    Dec. 31, 2009
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    Area 51
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    Interesting how they say no Jazz or Sandro Hit breeding...
    I LOVE my Chickens!


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2007
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    Canada
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    I hate when people exclude specific bloodlines. You want an international horse and yet you exclude the top sire of international GP horses? I get they have a reputation but there are Jazz and SH offspring that are super rideable. Weird.
    www.svhanoverians.com

    "Simple: Breeding,Training, Riding". Wolfram Wittig.


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2009
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
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    Agreed Donella ... wouldn't it be better to look at the individual horse rather than to wipe out the number one sire of Grand Prix horses in one fell swoop!


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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2003
    Location
    Slatington, PA, USA
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    242

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donella View Post
    I hate when people exclude specific bloodlines. You want an international horse and yet you exclude the top sire of international GP horses? I get they have a reputation but there are Jazz and SH offspring that are super rideable. Weird.
    I don't understand the young horse FEI prospect age requirement. If a horse is between 6 and 9 years old, they should already be well on their way to FEI, and performing FEI by 9. I consider a FEI prospect to be younger than 6. I also don't like the blanket refusal to look at Jazz and Sandro Hit offspring. Shakespeare RSF is the most rideable horse I have ever bred, as are his offspring, and Jazz isn't for the poor rider, but his track record for producing FEI horses is undeniable.
    http://www.rollingstonefarm.com
    Large Oldenburg and Hanoverian breeding farm
    Standing Shakespeare RSF, Fhitzgerald, Sir James and the homebred stallion Dheputy.


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2003
    Location
    Eastern Pacific coast
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    3,720

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donella View Post
    I get they have a reputation but there are Jazz and SH offspring that are super rideable. Weird.
    Maybe rideable isn't the issue.
    -Amor vincit omnia-


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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2000
    Posts
    9,753

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    I am wondering how many BREEDERS have 6-9 y/o "international quality" horses. Most breeders want to sell their youngsters as soon as possible, and not spend the time and money to keep them around and in training for that many years. Seems only those with a good sized facility so they don't get squeezed for room to house "training horses" along with mares and growing youngsters, AND have in-house trainers, would keep such horses around. Even then, those horses are costing them $$$$ they may never recover unless the horse is a true superstar in the making, but they must worry every single day that the horse may get injured.

    That said, I know a couple people that have been contacted directly by Lionshare to ask about young horses they may have.


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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2006
    Location
    Colorado
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    At the very least it is an opportunity to put American bred youngstock in front of people who may never have heard of your program but may file away the info for future use. For free.


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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2007
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    Canada
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    I don't understand the young horse FEI prospect age requirement. If a horse is between 6 and 9 years old, they should already be well on their way to FEI, and performing FEI by 9

    Ha, yes, that too!
    www.svhanoverians.com

    "Simple: Breeding,Training, Riding". Wolfram Wittig.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2007
    Location
    Canada
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    I am wondering how many BREEDERS have 6-9 y/o "international quality" horses. Most breeders want to sell their youngsters as soon as possible, and not spend the time and money to keep them around and in training for that many years. Seems only those with a good sized facility so they don't get squeezed for room to house "training horses" along with mares and growing youngsters, AND have in-house trainers, would keep such horses around. Even then, those horses are costing them $$$$ they may never recover unless the horse is a true superstar in the making, but they must worry every single day that the horse may get injured.

    That is true for most breeders but there are some out there I would assume? We have kept quite a few of mine with the plans to develop them into FEI horses. To me this is what breeding is all about. If I had to sell them as foals I wouldn't breed.
    www.svhanoverians.com

    "Simple: Breeding,Training, Riding". Wolfram Wittig.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    here, there, everywhere
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    552

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    I can understand the aversion to Jazz more than the aversion to SH, and I agree the age thing seems off. But it's encouraging to see them looking to shop in the US.

    Wierd though that this was deemed worthy of an article by eurodressage. The cynic in me is betting more than one BNT is wishing they'd thought of this tactic first.
    "No snowflake in an avalanche ever feels responsible." George Burns


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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2012
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    204

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    Quote Originally Posted by DownYonder View Post
    I am wondering how many BREEDERS have 6-9 y/o "international quality" horses. Most breeders want to sell their youngsters as soon as possible, and not spend the time and money to keep them around and in training for that many years. Seems only those with a good sized facility so they don't get squeezed for room to house "training horses" along with mares and growing youngsters, AND have in-house trainers, would keep such horses around. Even then, those horses are costing them $$$$ they may never recover unless the horse is a true superstar in the making, but they must worry every single day that the horse may get injured:
    I agree that this is the case most of the time however, I can say that I sold one of mine as at 7. Although she was not technically "for sale", it was the right buyer and all worked out well



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