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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2011
    Location
    The Land of Buggies and Black Bumpers
    Posts
    847

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    You can have the axles blocked to raise the height of the trailer and still keep it level. Any good trailer mechanic can do this for you and some trailer come from the manufacturer with the axels already block, so this is a common practice in the industry.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2000
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    590

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    I had a friend with the same problem with her brand new truck and older trailer. She had a Ford and she had the blocks replaced on her rear axles which lowered it 2 inches and 2" blocks added to the axles of her trailer to raise it. So she ended up with 4" more of clearance. The Ford dealer recommended a place to do the truck and the trailer blocks were added by a local trailer dealer who ordered a kit for the Dexter axles. She was worried about it affecting the 4 wheel drive, but it was fine. I think the Dexter axle kit for the trailer was like $200 or maybe that was the whole install. Either way, it wasn't a terribly expensive fix for both the truck and trailer (as opposed to buying a new trailer !)

    I just bought a new trailer and I too was sweating it out about how it was going to fit with my truck, but luckily both the truck and trailer fit so I had plenty of clearance. I think the dealer said at least 6" between bed and trailer deck was the general rule.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2006
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,364

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    Blocks! That's what my husband was referring to.
    "And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse..." ~Revelation 19:11



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2000
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    590

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    One thing to keep in mind, is that if you have a half ramp on your trailer (as in full height doors and half ramp), the trailer dealer said that the 2" axle blocks might make the ramp too steep. If you have the full ramp with tail doors, the blocks should be fine.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,464

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    I once had the same problem and fitted shorter spring blocks on the truck, which lowered the bed just enough. 4x4s are higher than 2WD.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,159

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    I have blocked my trailer. 3 inch blocks to raise the back of the trailer plus increasing the gooseneck coupler tube. My trailer rides just a tad uphill. Only downside is the trailer floor is a high step for the horses. (they manage it) The urine runs out the back unless we're headed downhill. I have 9 inches between the truck rails and the bottom of the neckover. And... have used every bit of that clearance



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2004
    Location
    chester county, pa
    Posts
    89

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    I had the same problem with my last F350 and trailer. Did the same thing as rocky213's friend mentioned above. The F350 in most years comes from the factory with 2 inch blocks in the front and 4 inch blocks in the back so if you switch the back blocks to 2 inches it doesn't affect the four-wheel-drive or anything the truck rides level instead of a little high in the back. This doesn't cost too much. I also put blocks on the trailer axle but as most people mentioned that makes the ramp or the step up steep.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,772

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    For those turning axles over:

    Make sure the axle is not one with a built in camber. Most trailer axles are built with an up camber in the middle so they flatten out at max rated load. You don't want the tires to start tilted in at the top before you even put any weight on them. This is dangerous for a number of reasons.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,122

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    There are also flatbed truck bodies available, not cheap though. http://www.knapheide.com/products/gooseneck-bodies/
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
    Posts
    904

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom King View Post
    For those turning axles over:

    Make sure the axle is not one with a built in camber. Most trailer axles are built with an up camber in the middle so they flatten out at max rated load. You don't want the tires to start tilted in at the top before you even put any weight on them. This is dangerous for a number of reasons.
    Pretty sure they only flip the spacers, not the axle.



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