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  1. #21
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horserider15 View Post
    I know, it's not very high at all. I've jumped 4 ft on the horses that are able to do that. But the barn where I ride doesn't have those types of horses come in very often, we can't afford it. I do have my own horse, who I was showing at the 2ft level. He was still young himself. But he recently came up with dry hocks, and I will never be able to afford to take him to the height that I would like to go without a lameness. So I have decided to sell him in order to buy myself a car to take me around to some new barns, clinics, exc. So right now I am showing young OTTBs in the cross-rail classes at shows. It's all I can do right now. But I get payed to do it.
    Getting a car is pretty critical then and should open some more doors. I think when interviewing, you are best really to just say that you really do not have showing experience other than taking grean beans in little hunter classes. And it sounds like you really have no experience eventing correct?

    I would really try and volunteer at as many events as you can, and audit as many clinics as you can. And getting your car will help with all of that. If you really want to try the WS stint....I suspect you will need to go away from home. Some places will provide housing. I would get your feet wet with one just over the summer and then go from there.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horserider15 View Post
    I know, I could never afford to drive that far. I am looking into this for an opportunity after I am done with high school and before I go to college. I graduate next spring, 2014. I'm in northeast Ohio, but I would be looking for a live-in situation at a stable, possibly. Do you think that VA is closer that PA for me?

    VA is not really closer....but my point was more you are probably as close to the middleburg VA places as you are to the parts of PA that really have the density of eventers.

    I suspect you have closer places like Deltawave has suggested.

    After you get your feet a bit wet, you could consider the eventing mecca locations in Area II but you may want to stick closer to home at first.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  3. #23
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    If Kentucky is in your possible sphere, Megan Moore has a robust WS program, but I'm not sure what qualifications she requires. It's Team CEO Eventing.
    Click here before you buy.



  4. #24
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    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post
    Getting a car is pretty critical then and should open some more doors. I think when interviewing, you are best really to just say that you really do not have showing experience other than taking grean beans in little hunter classes. And it sounds like you really have no experience eventing correct?

    I would really try and volunteer at as many events as you can, and audit as many clinics as you can. And getting your car will help with all of that. If you really want to try the WS stint....I suspect you will need to go away from home. Some places will provide housing. I would get your feet wet with one just over the summer and then go from there.
    Okay, thanks a lot. Yes, I have no experience eventing. I do plan on doing something as a working student....probably best to start with a smaller barn that will let me compete, then moving up from there.



  5. #25
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    Thanks for the advice, I'll tune it down now.
    Last edited by Horserider15; Feb. 6, 2013 at 11:06 PM.



  6. #26
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    You're fine for your level, don't sweat it. But shorten your stirrups about 3 holes before you go eventing. Have you seen this? www.flatlandersdressage.com
    Click here before you buy.



  7. #27
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    Aug. 19, 2012
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    PA
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    If you want to learn about eventing without getting in over your head, a good place to start would be the Northeast Ohio Mini Trials:

    http://www.minitrialseries.org/

    They have riders of many levels, from training down to what is essentially ground poles, so it is somewhere you could compete at a low level but still get a taste of what eventing is all about. If you can't or don't want to compete, I'm sure most of the organizers would love to have you as a volunteer ... They are always looking for jump judges and the like!



  8. #28
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    Oct. 30, 2008
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    OP--A small piece of advice (which I hope you'll realize isn't person but truly meant to help). CHILL OUT. Spend more time reading threads than posting. Spend many long weekends working as a show groom. Go volunteer at horse trials. Watch youtube dressage videos (not of the lower levels!) and go scribe at shows. Find a vet or farrier who will let you do some ride-alongs. Ride your horse and then others. Take lessons at a dressage barn and at an eventing barn. Read Denny's book, How Good Riders Get Good. And give it TIME and then come back. Go volunteer with a local (reputable) horse rescue. The repeated threads about the same topics with little to no legwork on your own will do nothing but eventually piss off the very people whose advice you think is so vital. When I was a working student (hunter trainer, btw), the first rule I learned was to shut up and absorb everything going on around me and learn when and what was appropriate to ask. At this point, you've crossed my COTH line from ambitious kiddo to annoying teen and I doubt I'm the only one.

    I truly wish you well, but I think you're suffering from a lot of the teen angst--urgency of time, overinflation of skills, desire to "make it" in the horse world without any real clue what that means. Many of us, myself included have been there. But if you really want to go somewhere horsey, get out from behind the computer and go get involved--far beyond your home barn. That's only a small taste of what's out there and regardless of whether you event or not, a well-rounded horseman always has options available.
    Flip a coin. It's not what side lands that matters, but what side you were hoping for when the coin was still in the air.

    You call it boxed wine. I call it carboardeaux.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    You're fine for your level, don't sweat it. But shorten your stirrups about 3 holes before you go eventing. Have you seen this? www.flatlandersdressage.com
    Lol, okay. I will check out the link, thanks.



  10. #30
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    Oh, and take down that video! I'd highly recommend you not use your last name on anything youtube associated...especially while underage! And also, I'd never, ever use anything to even remotely market yourself when you are riding--much less jumping--WITHOUT A HELMET! I have no words, but my angry, protective mamabear side came out big time.
    Flip a coin. It's not what side lands that matters, but what side you were hoping for when the coin was still in the air.

    You call it boxed wine. I call it carboardeaux.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by jen-s View Post
    OP--A small piece of advice (which I hope you'll realize isn't person but truly meant to help). CHILL OUT. Spend more time reading threads than posting. Spend many long weekends working as a show groom. Go volunteer at horse trials. Watch youtube dressage videos (not of the lower levels!) and go scribe at shows. Find a vet or farrier who will let you do some ride-alongs. Ride your horse and then others. Take lessons at a dressage barn and at an eventing barn. Read Denny's book, How Good Riders Get Good. And give it TIME and then come back. Go volunteer with a local (reputable) horse rescue. The repeated threads about the same topics with little to no legwork on your own will do nothing but eventually piss off the very people whose advice you think is so vital. When I was a working student (hunter trainer, btw), the first rule I learned was to shut up and absorb everything going on around me and learn when and what was appropriate to ask. At this point, you've crossed my COTH line from ambitious kiddo to annoying teen and I doubt I'm the only one.

    I truly wish you well, but I think you're suffering from a lot of the teen angst--urgency of time, overinflation of skills, desire to "make it" in the horse world without any real clue what that means. Many of us, myself included have been there. But if you really want to go somewhere horsey, get out from behind the computer and go get involved--far beyond your home barn. That's only a small taste of what's out there and regardless of whether you event or not, a well-rounded horseman always has options available.
    You're right about everything, but I'm still learning. Sorry if I'm bothering all of you.



  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by jen-s View Post
    Oh, and take down that video! I'd highly recommend you not use your last name on anything youtube associated...especially while underage! And also, I'd never, ever use anything to even remotely market yourself when you are riding--much less jumping--WITHOUT A HELMET! I have no words, but my angry, protective mamabear side came out big time.
    Okay, I put it up to send to a trainer, my computer wouldn't hold a file that big. I like to make fun videos like that, a lot of kids do...



  13. #33
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by jen-s View Post
    Oh, and take down that video! I'd highly recommend you not use your last name on anything youtube associated...especially while underage! And also, I'd never, ever use anything to even remotely market yourself when you are riding--much less jumping--WITHOUT A HELMET! I have no words, but my angry, protective mamabear side came out big time.
    Okay, I put it up to send to a trainer, my computer wouldn't hold a file that big. I like to make fun videos like that, a lot of kids do...



  14. #34
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    Yes, but then you linked it on COTH. Edit your post, delete the link. And then make that video private if nothing else. You do NOT want that to be what people see when you are trying to grow (possibly) professionally in this business. There is NOTHING professional about that video. I *know* that lots of people make them, but you need to think things through before you create a reputation for yourself that may or may not be able to be undone. Look, all of this advice comes from someone who was just as eager as you are, but I luckily had a couple of really good mentors and learned a thing or two along the way. Drop the chip on your shoulder, can it with the ready excuses, and truly listen to what people (not just me, I'm probably just the most blunt) are saying. You are getting some great advice here from lots of posters. Take it.
    Flip a coin. It's not what side lands that matters, but what side you were hoping for when the coin was still in the air.

    You call it boxed wine. I call it carboardeaux.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
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    I do need to add, that I think you've got a great seat. It's light, not driving, and with some polish, you've got the potential to be a really good rider. DW is spot on though about the stirrups--even for hunters they are a couple of holes too long. You are lucky that you've got the foundation down, but I still think if you really want to grow as a rider, you'd be well-served by getting serious instruction from both dressage and eventing professionals. And go watch the pros ride--examine what they do critically. Look at how a different ride works for different people, different horses. Know what is good equitation and why that's the "standard." Understand the differences between how/why people ride differently, dressage vs forward seat for example. Immerse yourself and use every opportunity to learn more--think of yourself as a sponge for knowledge and skills. If you'll do that, combined with some solid basics in the saddle, you'll be in very good shape moving forward.
    Flip a coin. It's not what side lands that matters, but what side you were hoping for when the coin was still in the air.

    You call it boxed wine. I call it carboardeaux.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
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    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by jen-s View Post
    Yes, but then you linked it on COTH. Edit your post, delete the link. And then make that video private if nothing else. You do NOT want that to be what people see when you are trying to grow (possibly) professionally in this business. There is NOTHING professional about that video. I *know* that lots of people make them, but you need to think things through before you create a reputation for yourself that may or may not be able to be undone. Look, all of this advice comes from someone who was just as eager as you are, but I luckily had a couple of really good mentors and learned a thing or two along the way. Drop the chip on your shoulder, can it with the ready excuses, and truly listen to what people (not just me, I'm probably just the most blunt) are saying. You are getting some great advice here from lots of posters. Take it.
    Okay, I'll delete the link. Trust me, I read and absorb everything you tell me, so thank you. Taking down the link now...



  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jen-s View Post
    I do need to add, that I think you've got a great seat. It's light, not driving, and with some polish, you've got the potential to be a really good rider. DW is spot on though about the stirrups--even for hunters they are a couple of holes too long. You are lucky that you've got the foundation down, but I still think if you really want to grow as a rider, you'd be well-served by getting serious instruction from both dressage and eventing professionals. And go watch the pros ride--examine what they do critically. Look at how a different ride works for different people, different horses. Know what is good equitation and why that's the "standard." Understand the differences between how/why people ride differently, dressage vs forward seat for example. Immerse yourself and use every opportunity to learn more--think of yourself as a sponge for knowledge and skills. If you'll do that, combined with some solid basics in the saddle, you'll be in very good shape moving forward.
    Thanks, I will work on those things. I've contacted a local eventing barn (one of the only ones in my area) and asked about a working student position this summer....I am going to go to some events and clinics too, and learn as much as possible. Thanks for all of your help


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    AND PUT ON A HELMET! Your brain, if your command of the written word and remarkably thick skin for a teenager is any indication, is worth preserving.
    Click here before you buy.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    AND PUT ON A HELMET! Your brain, if your command of the written word and remarkably thick skin for a teenager is any indication, is worth preserving.
    Lol, yes ma'am. Don't know what I was thinking.



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