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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2013
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    5

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    Thanks guys it seems there is still hope for my friend and everything is not all in black or white. The perspective helped me to lighten up a bit on my friend's seller and it was very productive and informative. I made this thread as a reality check to see it from more than just one point of view and you have all helped with that. I am still suspicious of this seller, but no longer as convicted about it. Stuff happens in the horse world. It's important not to point fingers and to just be patient.

    Quote Originally Posted by IronwoodFarm View Post
    As a seller, I would not want to keep a sold horse on my property for any longer than necessary given the care, custody and control issues. I am surprised that the seller didn't work with the horse on loading, like feeding it on the trailer in a non-stressful situation.
    First of all thank you for your point of view. Secondly, that's another one of my red flags. If you have a horse for sale at all, unless it's a weanling or foal it really should know how to trailer. I've bought some that didn't and they were usually quick learners so I'm not calling that a deal breaker. But the seller had told my friend in writing that she would have the horse trailer-ready and then the horse was not. I have nothing against a horse that isn't trained for trailering as long as I know in advance. But no warning at all raises red flags.

    As for shippers, they can be problematic. Some of them work on crazy schedules so they want to pick-up at 3 a.m. Or they lack the person-power to deal with a difficult loader. I can understand the seller being concerned about conditions like rain or mud.
    Yes I feel that this shipper was inexperienced or did not have the person power to handle the horse, which is unfortunate. That is why I told my friend to go back and try my guy again--he knows what he's doing and he never comes ill prepared.

    Personally, I would go get the horse myself. Bring lunge lines, lunge whips. chain shanks, blindfolds, food, and plenty of extra people. Have a vet on hand if you need to drug the horse. Then take the horse home and teach it to load when there is no pressure.

    The shipping is the buyer's problem and the buyer seems flakey to me. Why on earth would you leave a horse for nearly a month over a shipping issue?
    Someone else said something similar in the thread so I figure I'll address it here. The first shipping attempt went awry within a week of the check clearing--it had been scheduled right away. The seller had rescheduled with the shipper herself for the 10th. But my friend did not want to make the seller wait and quickly (within 24 hours) booked a different shipper who was available within a week of that. After that, since it's TB season nearly every shipper within January was full so it was moved to February. Remember, the one who was responsible for the first two shipments not working out was the seller. She was given the shippers number and told to call ahead, the shipper even called her, and nothing came of it.

    I've sold many horses over the years. When a buyer is long distance and wants to get a horse shipper, I always make sure I'm in contact with that shipper and confirming the day before. I call the shipper myself even if they haven't called me or told me to call because I want to get the horse sent off as efficiently as possible. Why the seller didn't think to call the shipper even once when she had the number baffles me.

    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    1) Make sure horse is insured with friend listed as owner etc

    2) Make new arrangement with Shipper & either travel with to collect horse or meet Shipper at seller's farm to ensure there are no more delays. An experienced shipper WILL get the horse on the trailer.

    3) Make sure that papers are delivered/present with horse or shipped certified mail & received before collecting horse.

    If there really is suspicion of the seller, then ensure that new owner/trainer is there when correct horse is loaded.

    Mud & rain are absurd excuses to not ship: closed roads, blizzards - those are reasons to delay shipping.
    Excellent post. And I agree. Being concerned about mud is one thing but trying to reschedule shipping a buyer scheduled on their own over a chance of rain smells of fishy all over to me. I think this post is EXACTLY what my friend should do.

    It's fair to everyone involved.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogie View Post

    Unless the seller is refusing to ship the horse (and that doesn't seem to be the case), there's nothing to sue over.
    I agree.

    Quote Originally Posted by skydy View Post
    How far away is the horse?
    2 days drive.

    Quote Originally Posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    I'm not as suspicious about the seller's behavior, but regardless given the mis-cues so far, a five-figure horse seems worth a car trip or plane ticket to be there when the horse loads, and to make sure the papers are handed over.
    Of course it is. Food for thought- I've done remote purchases multiple times using shippers and the most of the time I never had to be there myself. Things went smoothly on day one. I totally agree that this is the way to do things.
    Last edited by tempotempo; Feb. 5, 2013 at 10:36 PM.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
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    2,047

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    Why do you think the seller wouldn't want the horse picked up? Do you think something has happened to the horse in the meantime and that the seller is trying to hide it? Or do you think that the seller doesn't intend to turn the horse over? I agree with Ironwood, most sellers are anxious to get sold horses off the farm and into their new owner's hands as efficiently as possible. There's no advantage to the seller to keep the horse longer than necessary.

    I understand what you are saying about it being a long distance deal and I agree that typically sellers do as a courtesy step up to the plate to try to be as helpful as possible getting sold horses shipped out to their new homes... But OTOH arranging that transportation and making it happen is squarely the responsibility of the buyer. While it does sound like this seller is being unusually unhelpful, sellers don't have any obligation to rearrange their schedules to meet shippers and/or get tricky horses loaded. It's a tough situation with your friend being far away, but if a few firm phone calls between her and the seller and the shipping company can't get things ironed out, it may be that the best course of action would be for her to buy that plane ticket and arrange to meet the shipper at the farm herself.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2011
    Location
    Co
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    4,199

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    Quote Originally Posted by BeeHoney View Post
    Why do you think the seller wouldn't want the horse picked up? Do you think something has happened to the horse in the meantime and that the seller is trying to hide it? Or do you think that the seller doesn't intend to turn the horse over? I agree with Ironwood, most sellers are anxious to get sold horses off the farm and into their new owner's hands as efficiently as possible. There's no advantage to the seller to keep the horse longer than necessary.

    I understand what you are saying about it being a long distance deal and I agree that typically sellers do as a courtesy step up to the plate to try to be as helpful as possible getting sold horses shipped out to their new homes... But OTOH arranging that transportation and making it happen is squarely the responsibility of the buyer. While it does sound like this seller is being unusually unhelpful, sellers don't have any obligation to rearrange their schedules to meet shippers and/or get tricky horses loaded. It's a tough situation with your friend being far away, but if a few firm phone calls between her and the seller and the shipping company can't get things ironed out, it may be that the best course of action would be for her to buy that plane ticket and arrange to meet the shipper at the farm herself.
    I agree.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    11,672

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    Your friend needs to arrange a shipper for a time where you friend can drive or fly there and then your friend can make sure the horse gets on the trailer.

    There are some little red flags but nothing overly scary. It is now time to just get this done.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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