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  1. #1
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    Nov. 17, 2006
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    Default Anyone Successful Getting OFF Sugar?

    I really want to get off sugar. I mean, really get off all the processed food with added sugar. But it's HARD. Has anyone done this? I know it's addictive, which is why it's so hard. Plus I'm trying to kick caffeine, too. I don't drink sugary drinks, which is good, but I do have a sweet tooth. Plus, sugar is in EVERYTHING. Sigh.

    Any words of wisdom??
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  2. #2
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    Caffeine -- I tapered -- went from one cup of coffee to half a cup, to two cups of tea, to one cup of tea, to one cup of green tea, to one cup of decaf tea over the course of a couple of weeks. I am back to two cups of tea, but it is better than before.

    On the sugar . . . I've cut way back but have not been 100% successful. I pretty much don't eat processed foods, or bake goodies. I also try not to have it in the house. I do have stevia (an herbal sweetener) that I use sometimes. I will say I do more often crave a piece of fruit after eating, which is good. But, I definitely don't limit myself to one piece of cake a year (as is suggested by some books I've read) -- that seems too hard to me, though it kind of is my goal.

    I doubt any of that has helped you!



  3. #3
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Default

    ease yourself out, find ways to reward yourself.

    i don't eat much sweets, have not really touched a cookie ina while (and with Girl Scout cookies in season, you know what that means)

    Coffee? meh, working on reducing it. For some reason it does not taste right right now anyhow. But I don't want to drink water first thing in the morning either.
    There, too, wean yourself.

    But generally speaking, I am not a fan of the all exclusive approach. Part of my personality I suppose.

    As for sweet tooth: you can substitude honey in some recipes. It's sweet, but not sugar - or some artificially contrived stuff.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  4. #4
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    Nov. 5, 2002
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    way out west
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    Default

    I did, a couple of years ago. I should say I didn't go so far as to read labels for all sugars and stop those. I just didn't have cookies, cake, pie, ice cream, etc. I had a killer headache for about four days, and then those quit. I also lost 15 pounds. I didn't change anything else. Still ate bread and butter and all those lovely carbs that call my name. But the sugar thing was really hard. I felt a ton better, though.



  5. #5
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    Sep. 4, 2012
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    Default

    I've never been successful at getting completely off sugar, but I have, at different times, been able to cut way back. The availability of Splenda, which maintains it sweetness in baked goods, which is my big weakness, is a great help.

    I started off by finding some "treat" recipes, like a yogurt, fruit, oat bran muffin recipe, that are low in sugar anyway, then using Splenda to bake them. That stuff lets me satisfy my sweet cravings. But, while sweet enough, they aren't as sweet as the usual treats, and after a while, my sweet cravings are at least toned down, making it easier to cut back on even the low sugar treats.

    However, inevitably, I am presented with some overwhelming temptation, like the aforementioned Girl Scout cookies, and I fall completely off the wagon again.



  6. #6
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    Apr. 12, 2010
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    PA
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    Sugar & Bleached Flour... I would love to eliminate them both. I have slowly taken steps to phase them out, such as Stevia in my coffee and more Ezekiel bread. But once a month Aunt Flo demands her Entenmann's and my husband is scared if he does not getit for her. I hope menopause makes kicking sugar easier at least!



  7. #7
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Default

    Ehh...I'm not sure taking "sugar" out of your diet is all that useful. For what reason are you trying to eliminate it?

    I only say that because so many other foods have "sugars" in them - dairy, fruit, vegetables, and many other things break down quickly into sugar - refined flour, for example...

    I think reducing "sugars" in your diet is a good thing. Eliminating "sugar" (in sweets, for example) is only one source.

    Then again, I don't eat many "sweets" at all - I don't have a sweet tooth. I don't crave sugary/sweet foods but many people do. So, if you are actually craving and eating a lot of sweets, then yes, I'd reduce them because they are mainly empty calories. I would start with portion control or limiting rather than trying to eliminate sugar (because, it is nearly impossible to eliminate "sugars" and why make yourself totally miserable?)

    One idea is to eliminate "processed" foods that have more than 4-5 ingredients. So, you can eat ice cream but only if it is literally milk/cream, sugar, and fruit or natural flavoring...etc. That cuts out many types of junk, but still allows you to have something you enjoy.

    Processed foods are worse (in my opinion) than plain old sugar.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Feb. 19, 2009
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    Are you better at doing things gradually or going cold turkey? I'm a cold turkey kind of person-even if just a little bit of something is around and I convince myself I can be weaned off it, it never works.

    So, if you're a cold turkey kind of person too (and have a good amount of willpower because it will be required) try a Whole30. http://whole9life.com/category/whole-30/

    I just finished mine up in January after a binge fest over the holidays and I feel absolutely great. It may take a couple to really get off the sugar addiction, but I highly recommend it. If you do decide to take the plunge, there are a ton of resources available, including the creator's website (and its all free). Feel free to PM me also!



  9. #9
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    Nov. 17, 2006
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    Default

    I realize many natural foods have sugar in them. I should have been more clear. Fruits, etc., have glucose in them. Galactose is in milke and gets converted to glucose. I'm not worried about that. It's the sucrose and fructose I want to eliminate as much as possible. From what I've read it can be toxic in high doses. I don't know if that's true, but I have read that the liver has trouble with high levels of sucrose and fructose. Our liver processes those similar to how it has to process alcholol (without the buzz). So it's really just a personal choice for me to get this stuff out of my diet if I can. Although I don't drink coffee, I really drink WAY too much Diet Coke (Coke Zero) and that's probably no better for me than the sugar. So those are my two goals.

    I will check out the Whole30, thanks.
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  10. #10
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    Default

    the diet soda is probably worse than the sugar.

    but like everything, moderation....we just make everything too sweet!

    I think the sugar consumption skyrocketed in recent decades...

    Most foods do not need any, but sugar used like salt - sparingly - can round out flavors when you cook! I do normally - when I think about it - add a bit of sugar to my chilies and pasta sauce, not much, a tea spoon for a regular size dinner, more of course for the huge crock pot....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    I think my problem is I can't do moderation. I'm more of an all or nothing. And the all is really dragging me down.
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ParadoxFarm View Post
    I think my problem is I can't do moderation. I'm more of an all or nothing. And the all is really dragging me down.

    Discipline, Grasshopper!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  13. #13
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    Jun. 19, 2001
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    Default

    I've never sworn off sugar entirely (and doubt I will because I have a HUGE sweet tooth, love to bake and really, life is too short not to have cake ). I have found though, in the past, that if you cut back by slowly sweetening everything less (i.e. half a spoon of sugar in your coffee instead of a whole one, etc.), your taste buds literally adjust and your cravings quiet down. The first few days are rough, and distractions are useful, especially if you're a snacker or mindless eater (I'm both). But once you get past the initial "hump" it really does get easier and you'll crave it all less. So just hang in there!



  14. #14
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    Feb. 22, 2009
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    I have stopped using white refined sugar and use raw cane sugar and only use whole wheat flour now. It has made a big difference. We don't eat as much of what we make with it and the processed food doesn't taste as good to us now. Though my weak spot is frozen chocolate custard Mmmmmmmmmmm. But even that I only crave every now and then, mostly at that time of the month Don't drink diet soda anymore. That was actually pretty easy to give up. Coffee though there is no way I will give that up! I find that having a piece of my organic fruit each day I don't crave unhealthy stuff as much anymore



  15. #15
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    Nov. 12, 2011
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    Default

    Baby steps. I carry a small liquid stevia in my purse at all times so I'll have it for coffee, tea, whatever.
    "A horse gallops with his lungs, perseveres with his heart, and wins with his character." - Tesio



  16. #16
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    May. 20, 2003
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    Default

    I have greatly cut back on sugar in the past 2 years, but not eliminated it. I LOVE sugar, but try not to do sweets (except for once a month, no choice there -- give me a truffle!) very often, and I don't keep them in the house or buy them generally. I also try to stay away from white bread, only having wheat or rye. So in general, I just try to cut the carbs, which helps to cut the sugar cravings. I use Truvia, Splenda, etc whenever possible.

    I have, however, eliminated the diet soda that I was drinking, which was huge for me. I never drank coffee, so it is just a lot of green tea (hot or iced), chamomile tea, or the occasional Earl Gray. It is amazing what really getting rid of the soda does for you. If I drink it now, I have a headache within an hour. That stuff is so bad!
    Cherry Blossom Farm - Show & Field Hunters, Side Saddles



  17. #17
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    Apr. 5, 2006
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    Default

    Sugar has always been the hardest thing for me to cut out of my diet. In the last two years, however, I have greatly reduced my sugar consumption. I still eat fruit and some honey, but I've gotten to the point where I can feel a difference physically when I consume too much sugar (with too much being a much, much smaller amount than it used to be). How did I get to this point? After some a major flare of some undiagnosed GI problems I decided to go gluten free. About 6-9 months after that I cut out most dairy and all high fructose corn syrup and limit my consumption of any corn syrup. I eat very few processed items and generally feel awful when I indulge in too much processed food including the supposedly healthy stuff.



  18. #18
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    Thanks, all. It is helpful to hear everyone's trials and tribulations. . I promised my husband after my last two liter of diet coke, I won't buy anymore. That is going to be tough! Then I'm working on the sugar. I might try the Eat Clean plan. Wish me luck.
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  19. #19

    Default

    It's hard!

    my advice is to take it one day at a time, be forgiving of slipups but don't use that as a reason to binge and eat cake on your birthday.

    First couple days are the hardest but after that the cravings ease up and the eat everything feeling does go away.
    for more Joy then you can handle
    http://dangerbunny.blogspot.com/



  20. #20
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    Oct. 25, 2012
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    You know you've done it and there's no turning back when the "Fearless Flyer" arrives from Trader Joe's and the only thing in it you'd eat is the Teriyaki Turkey Jerky!

    See Paleo Thread for inspiration . . .

    I now think of "sugars" in the same context as "warfarin."



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