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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2006
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    Colorado
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    2,189

    Default PRID?

    progesterone releasing intra uterine device. Put one in for 7 days, give a shot of prostaglandin on the 6th day. You expect them in season 5-7 days later.

    I just read this on FB - the poster works at a TB breeding farm. I've never heard them mentioned here, so obviously I don't believe they exist Do we have them in the US?

    They sound pretty good!
    Last edited by Molly Malone; Feb. 5, 2013 at 09:12 AM. Reason: spelling



  2. #2
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    Jan. 2, 2006
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    Default

    More information - it's designed to work on cattle but works very successfully in horses.



  3. #3
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    Jan. 24, 2009
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    Default

    From what I've read (but no practical experience), it works the same as Regumate but relieves you of daily administration... Also known as CIDR- controlled internal drug releasing device (I think these are more the sponges). It's progesterone vs progesten (Regumate)

    Apparently it allows a quicker oestrus and ovulation post progesterone treatment because it allows natural development of the follicle to continue during treatment. Another advantage may be that the levels of systemic progesterone decline over time, as the hormone from the device is absorbed. Reported intervals of 2-3 days from end of treatment to oestrus and ovulation for PRID and CIDR vs reports of 8-10 days on Regumate. Downside is potential vaginitis.

    It's licensed in the US as Eazi-Breed but that's for cattle, not labeled for use in horses. New Zealand have an equine specific Cue-Mare- there's an interesting paper on that if you want to read: http://www.matamatavets.co.nz/wp-con...are%202012.pdf


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  4. #4
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    Default

    Thanks! The paper says

    Therefore, this treatment protocol appeared to offer a convenient, economical and reliable method for managing transitional mares

    That's not the same as AHF is it? I wonder what the advantages/disadvantages over BET altrogenest might be (cost wise)? Possibly that you don't need to order a full bottle... but you'd need the vet to do the implant probably.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2003
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    MO
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    Default

    The intra-vaginal devices are used all the time in cattle. You can use them in mares, but they cause a really nasty vaginitis that most owners object to. It doesn't seem to cause long-term issues, but with the other products available it doesn't seem worth it.
    Last edited by Hillside H Ranch; Feb. 5, 2013 at 02:56 PM.
    Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm."
    --Winston Churchill
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hills...h/112931293227
    www.HillsideHRanch.com


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2003
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    Oxford, MD USA
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    1,400

    Default

    They are actually vaginal inserts, not uterine


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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2003
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    MO
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elizabeth Callahan View Post
    They are actually vaginal inserts, not uterine
    Yes, you are definitely correct! That's what I get for being in a hurry...I fixed it.
    Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm."
    --Winston Churchill
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hills...h/112931293227
    www.HillsideHRanch.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2008
    Posts
    173

    Default

    They are not much used in North America, but are in the UK and NZ.

    The cattle CIDRs, although they work in the mare as far as releasing the correct hormones, have a tendency to dislodge and fall out, hence the development of the CueMare in NZ.

    The P&E combination has merit in synchronizing onset of estrus, but has not been shown to produce as close a synchronicity of ovulation as the injectable form.

    As noted by Hillside, vaginitis and cervicitis are typical sequela of treatment, although they have usually subsided by the time of breeding.

    Hope this helps.


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Similar Threads

  1. PRID (Progesterone Releasing Intra Uterine Device)
    By TrueColours in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: May. 22, 2010, 11:48 PM

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