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  1. #21
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    Apr. 21, 2010
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    My daughter does NOT take anything from the dog. She is not allowed. She knows it and doesn't try. This was in passing.

    No, the dog does not need them. I thought it would be a nice thing for her to enjoy, and a way to keep her occupied for a little bit. But they're gone!
    She does get a kong filled with peanut butter and a busy buddy, but she gets those when we are leaving for the day. So she enjoys those at home.

    Thank you all for the help, I know we can get through this!



  2. #22
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    Jun. 15, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by spacytracy View Post


    Thank you all for the help, I know we can get through this!
    Yes, you can. Like I said, you work on the drop it and give them a treat for giving it to you then give it back. I really think I only did two or three sessions with my dog and that was it.

    Here is a good book to read as well:
    http://www.amazon.com/Leader-Pack-An...2505331&sr=8-1
    Last edited by Beethoven; Feb. 5, 2013 at 05:39 PM.



  3. #23
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    Mar. 16, 2003
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    Wet and Windy Washington
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    Why would it be? There definitely IS ranking among most social animals, wolves included.
    There was the old premise of having to 'show' just how alpha you were and many poeple trained with that in mind. The truth is, just your posture and day to day interaction establishes your position and there is no need to have to 'show' it. Hence the old alpha style training is not really used (used to be things like scruffing the dog, walking through the doorway first etc).
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  4. #24
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    Feb. 10, 2006
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    Middle of Nowhere, take a right, FL
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    4,425

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    Quote Originally Posted by JackSprats Mom View Post
    There was the old premise of having to 'show' just how alpha you were and many poeple trained with that in mind. The truth is, just your posture and day to day interaction establishes your position and there is no need to have to 'show' it. Hence the old alpha style training is not really used (used to be things like scruffing the dog, walking through the doorway first etc).
    Actually that (posture and interaction) IS the way you show it. I think what you mean maybe is that it isn't necessary to pound it into the dog's head with a giant hammer!
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  5. #25
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    Jul. 26, 2001
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    Toronto, Canada.
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    I have one who used to be a resource hoarder. She would never growl, but would give me the "look". She was neither anxious, hyper or fearful, but she did hoard her items in her kennel.

    First thing was to take her kennel away. Then she became a hoarder in other places. I taught her to "fetch it up". So whatever she had, she had to bring to me and "drop it". When she did, I gave her a treat (something she liked MORE than the thing she was guarding). We then progressed to fetching it up, dropping it then walking to another room and leave the toy/bone etc.

    Eventually, if she had something, I could tell her to fetch it up and drop it and that was that, she left it alone once I told her to drop it (actually, her command word is OUT).

    Now, she still loves her toys (at 13) but the instant I say out, its on the floor and she knows to leave it.

    Might be worth making it a game/training tool for her. You should then never need to take anything away from her, but she can bring it to you and leave it.



  6. #26
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    Apr. 1, 2008
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    pretty much what Wendy said. I'd do two things slightly different. I would also work up to high value stuff with the "drop it", and I'd teach "place" so that you can send the dog to her "place" and that's the only place she's allowed to have high value, long lasting items. That way your daughter knows where the dog is, the dog knows her safe place and won't be in the way by accident.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Apr. 21, 2010
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    She does have a "place" so we can definitely bring that in.



  8. #28
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    Aug. 28, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackSprats Mom View Post
    There was the old premise of having to 'show' just how alpha you were and many poeple trained with that in mind. The truth is, just your posture and day to day interaction establishes your position and there is no need to have to 'show' it. Hence the old alpha style training is not really used (used to be things like scruffing the dog, walking through the doorway first etc).
    In a wolf pack the dominant animals control control food allocation if there isn't unlimited food for everyone.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
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    El Paso, TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by spacytracy View Post
    It depends. Sometimes she's with us, sometimes downstairs on her own.

    She has seperation anxiety, which is something else we are working on.

    This is the second rawhide she's ever had, I wonder if this "new" thing is too precious to her. I can't remember if it was a toy or a treat she growled before, I kind of think it was a bone that she doesn't chew, really. She more or less runs around outside with it and tosses it around and acts a fool.
    Probably considered it VERY high value and didn't want to risk having to give it up. You can work on trading up treats/objects, and have your daughter do it with you. (Might want to be careful about rawhides due to choking/impaction risk), and switch to bully sticks instead.



  10. #30
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    May. 4, 2006
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    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
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    Have the young teens who exercise the dog been playing tug of war or chase the dog with whatever item dog has, even playfully can get this kind of thing started. It happened with my older Jack Russell and the new dog in the house over the food bag, a dish and I forget what else, he punched a hole in the puppy's ear twice so do be careful and check with the teens. What precipitated it with my dogs was their chasing a ball together, and he was always loosing in the chase, frustration level, etc.
    "I have brought on the hatred of Wall Street and I relish it".
    Franklin Delano Roosevelt



  11. #31
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    Apr. 21, 2010
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    I hnestly don't know, but mostly they walk her. But could be that they are playing tug. I did think of that.

    Man this dogs nose is too good! We've been working on this and she easily gives up whatever she has, because she smells the treats we are hiding. Haha. Good problem to have though!



  12. #32
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    Apr. 1, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by spacytracy View Post
    I hnestly don't know, but mostly they walk her. But could be that they are playing tug. I did think of that.

    Man this dogs nose is too good! We've been working on this and she easily gives up whatever she has, because she smells the treats we are hiding. Haha. Good problem to have though!
    then keep treats on you all the time you are home.

    "Just because I have them doesn't mean they are available"

    "just because you don't see/smell them, doesn't mean I don't have any"

    @tug: I play tug with all my dogs. Tug doesn't = possession guarding. Tug is an excellent way to teach your dog to "out" or "give" and that would be to your benefit here.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    IME dogs like this really want to please; mine is so proud of herself when she feels like we're happy with her. Teaching her different ways to be a good dog has been so good for her. If I didn't take the "build it up" approach with her she would be a very sad possessive scared sort of dog and instead she's a beautiful sweet kind sensitive pup that just has a bad day sometimes. I watched my dumb little goat bonk on this big strong young dog for five minutes once and she never fought back. Food aggressiveness isn't a "mean" trait... it's a downtrodden sort of trait.

    This is mine and she's as sweet and worried as she appears:

    http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y25...2/DSC01637.jpg



  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    This is mine and she's as sweet and worried as she appears:

    http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y25...2/DSC01637.jpg
    she does look worried. Glad she's with someone who works with her.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
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    Jan. 19, 2013
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    "The child probably did something you didn't notice."

    The dog is a neurotic nutcase and the kid gets the blame?
    The dog would be on a one way trip to the vet if it was mine. Too many stable dogs need homes to put up with this dangerous garbage.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
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    Jan. 28, 2013
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    Southeastern US
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    Our dog growled at our son. We spoke with our trainer and a behaviorist from the local veterinary college. It was a fear thing, (also a submissive dog) despite fair treatment by us and our son being extremely careful around the dog and always supervised. In our case, the dog escalated to a snap. No broken skin, but he had to go. As our trainer put it, "You might be able to work with the dog, but do you want to put your child at risk for a bite?". One bite on the face will scar a child for life and not just physically. That is where children get bit most often because of their height. The problem with growling is that it's hard to predict if it is going to escalate (from the dog's POV, the child has been warned). Fear is a scary a emotion in dogs and not one I would mess with.

    FLame away. I have worked with difficult dogs and kept dogs that had a few issues, but that was when I was single. Not worth it with a child.

    In our case, a family member took the dog. We flew him out to my dad and he is living the life of Riley now. In our family, animals don't go to the pound. We keep them in the family. That's how we ended up with a Shetland Pony when we were first married, LOL!



  17. #37
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    Dec. 10, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by gogaitedgo View Post
    "The child probably did something you didn't notice."

    The dog is a neurotic nutcase and the kid gets the blame?
    The dog would be on a one way trip to the vet if it was mine. Too many stable dogs need homes to put up with this dangerous garbage.
    Yeah, not the most popular course of action in cuddly COTH-land but a dog that growls at my kid won't be long for this world. It will either be gone or be put down.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
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    Apr. 21, 2010
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    And obviously this is my top concern. I never want to put my daughter at risk.

    Clearly the last few comments plant seeds of "what do I do" in my head.

    On one hand, these two incidents were the only times I've observed this behavior. Otherwise she is loyal, tolerant, and aims to please.

    On the other, I never want to look back and say "I should have done X"



  19. #39
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    I'm sure lots of dogs get PTS or sent to the pound for behavior like this.

    I'm sure a lot of horses get sold on the spot for bucking under a poorly fitting saddle or tossing their heads with their 1975 long shanked Tom Thumb bits in their mouth.

    And then sometimes people try harder.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
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    Apr. 1, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by spacytracy View Post
    And obviously this is my top concern. I never want to put my daughter at risk.

    Clearly the last few comments plant seeds of "what do I do" in my head.

    On one hand, these two incidents were the only times I've observed this behavior. Otherwise she is loyal, tolerant, and aims to please.

    On the other, I never want to look back and say "I should have done X"
    if you look back through my posts, you will find that if I think euthing is safest, I suggest it.

    I have not done that here, because the dog has specific issues in specific circumstances. Circumstances that can be modified, worked with, managed or trained around. I just don't see this dog as dangerous, with the description from the OP.

    If you should decide to euth the dog, then I will support you.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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