The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 3 of 19 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 374
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Sep. 10, 2008
    Posts
    366

    Default

    To make your head spin even more, check out the book "Nourishing Traditions"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    I agree with whoever said some sanity has to come into things as we aren't truly living as hunter gatherers but I do agree with the principals of eating the no grain diet in particular. While I feel that a few bites of dairy or beans now and then won't likely mess you up too much, I challenge any naysayer to go wheat free for a month. THEN try eating it again. Odds are good it will make you sick or feel awful. That's your body trying to digest that stuff and once you heal up inside, it hurts as it tears you up all over again. Even my husband who never had any obvious issues with wheat has noticed it. He broke down and had pizza one day at work and paid for it all night.

    I've been doing Paleo for nearly two years now and my teeth haven't fallen out and I'm healthier than when I was 25..the same weight as I was at that age also...I'l be 50 this year...so I think it's working fine. You do not NEED grains...There is nothing in grains that you can't get from other foods with way less sugar and carbs not to mention the other nasty stuff in it.

    Those who say wheat is not causing them problems simply don't realize the damage and inflammation wheat causes in your gut..nasty stuff like leaky gut and all that builds and intensifies as you get older. The Wheat Belly book is cool because the author points out accurately that the "new" dwarf wheats aggressively hybridized with techniques like radiation and chemical baths is not the same wheat of earlier times. It literally has new gluten proteins never before consumed by human beings and is much more potent than earlier varieties. It also has a gliandin protein that affects your brain to make you more hungry...it is similar to an opiate in it's action....so it's addictive, appetite stimulating and has a higher glycemic index than sugar and don't think for a minute that our gov't and food companies don't KNOW that. It's no coincidence that wheat is added to nearly everything processed these days. (tin foil hat in place!) They want you hungry and eating more. It's no wonder so many people are fat and sick and so many people are now reacting to gluten. What used to be a rare affliction is now becoming very common. People aren't making this up. It's for real.

    Someone asked how and what we eat. I don't have a lot of time to cook but I try hard. I also raise and grow a lot of my own veggies and food animals. I eat a lot of eggs as we have about 100 hens out there. I end up eating the little ones too small to sell.

    A typical day for me for me is a breakfast of eggs, bacon or sausage..sometimes I'll make something with almond flour like cinnamon buns and eat that. I often have fresh fruit or something I canned like peaches. Maybe a Boars Head hot dog for some meat. That brand is gluten and sugar free. I also don't get all knotted up over nitrates but I do intend to have our own pigs processed with out it. They go to be processed in 2 weeks. I also have made some delicious almond flour pancakes..nom nom...but that is a treat as we use maple syrup and that is a lot of sugar. I still have coffee and use local honey as my sweetener.

    Lunch, when I'm home I try to have a nice big salad or warm up leftovers from dinner. On the road doing my farrier thing, I'll eat almonds, fruit and sometimes even potato chips..I know that is "bad" but I work hard enough to burn off the carbs when I'm working under horses..believe me... When I backpack, I'll also consume potatoes and rice for the high carbs in my dehydrated food as you simply have to have it to keep up that level of intense activity.

    Now and then for a treat, I'll make some rice at home too but that's a once every other month thing...not a staple of my diet...but it doesn't bother me and I burn it off. My weight has been stable for 2 years now.

    Dinner we eat a lot of grass fed beef (ours)...roasts, steaks, ground beef. I've made salisbury steak and meatloaf...and sometimes just burgers without bread. We eat chicken (ours) also...many ways to prepare it from almond flour chicken fingers to whole roasters. We eat a lot of local pork...roasts, chops, etc... and I have some lamb in the freezer and have a recipe for paleo shepherd's pie using cauliflower for potatoes that is to DIE for. It's in the book Paleo Comfort Foods which is a good practical cookbook.

    Veggies can be fresh from our garden in season, frozen from my garden, and we do buy a few things that we don't have. We have a ton of our own sweet potatoes and some regular potatoes also. I'm try hard to fill in the blanks and raise much of what we need and I intend to get a pressure canner this year and have our own canned food which is very easy to just pull out and use.

    I have a winter garden that was doing great until our last bad cold snap and snow but my chard is coming back and much of my lettuce survived. I was out digging parsnips from my garden for our Christmas dinner. I have overwintering beets, onions, carrots and parsnips out there too.

    I honestly don't think I've ever eaten as good of food in my life since we started raising our own and focusing on the Paleo food/diet. Lately, I have tried to eat "normal" stuff a few times and I can barely choke it down. I got some gluten free mac and cheese one night just for the sin and novelty of it and it was awful. I almost couldn't eat it. Gluten free bread also tastes horrible to me....nasty dry stuff.

    I'm convinced after the last two years that what we LIKE is more a habit than true TASTE. We get used to eating certain things but you do adjust and learn to like other stuff better. Like my aversion now to any grain products. Ick...tastes awful but I used to sit and munch down on it all day if I could.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2005
    Posts
    939

    Default

    Have not read any of the other posts but just wanted to chime in before I got too bogged down reading replies.

    I have been interested in paleo/primal for a few months now. Some COTHers may remember that I quit sugar for a time last fall. I basically fell off the wagon when Thanksgiving came a-knockin'.

    I see that way of eating as the ideal but not always the most accessible. When my BF and I are flush with cash we shop at the farmer's markets, buy local meat and diary, and avoid packaged foods. When money is tighter? We are much more inclined to eat frozen foods (although organic) and vegetables, and pack sandwiches for lunch.

    While eating paleo is what makes us feel our best I can't say that I'm really interested in committing THAT much time to our eating habits. I think that those who are able to best commit to paleo as a lifestyle choice are benefiting from it directly (such as Mark's Daily Apple or Robb Wolf--they make their living spreading this way of eating).

    And this is to say nothing of the social ramifications of eating this way. I just can't ignore cultural/emotional triggers when eating.

    Okay going to read what others have said!



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2005
    Posts
    939

    Default

    Also wanted to chime in about FODMAP foods. These are really the triggers for me. I totally have to avoid garlic and onions if I want to avoid a breakout of hives.



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    9,917

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    I agree with whoever said some sanity has to come into things as we aren't truly living as hunter gatherers but I do agree with the principals of eating the no grain diet in particular. While I feel that a few bites of dairy or beans now and then won't likely mess you up too much, I challenge any naysayer to go wheat free for a month. THEN try eating it again. Odds are good it will make you sick or feel awful. That's your body trying to digest that stuff and once you heal up inside, it hurts as it tears you up all over again. Even my husband who never had any obvious issues with wheat has noticed it. He broke down and had pizza one day at work and paid for it all night.
    Probably because he no longer had the flora in his gut to digest the wheat, or something else was wrong with the pizza.

    Any sudden change in diet can cause digestive upset.

    I'm not arguing that eating vegetables instead of grain is a bad thing, and I think that the best thing to battle hunger is protein, but I honestly do not believe that everyone needs to swear off grains and dairy entirely and forever.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    the evergreen state!
    Posts
    1,253

    Default

    I tried Paleo last year. It was great, initially - bright shiney object, something fun and different to do. I lost weight, felt great for a bit.

    Then the problems. 1, my digestion was just not going well. My list of "can't eats" - mainly in the vegetable world was growing - the stomach aches were unbearable. I was getting majorly overwhelmed by the can/can't have, and additionally, the cooking. Oh dear, all the cooking.

    I don't like to cook. I don't have time to cook. At first I managed by cooking 1 day a week, and made little meals for myself to grab throughout the week. That worked, but it made Sunday feel like another day at the office, and I began to hate it.

    So I fell off the wagon. I rebelled. I gained weight. Then, in October, something happened. My husband bought a Nutribullet (the magic bullet version of a blender).

    We started with 1 nutriblast a day, in the evening. Slowly but surely this little machine took over my diet. I am now drinking 2 24 oz of nutriblasts 2x a day, for breakfast and lunch. For dinner, if i am hungry, home, and available to cook, i will eat a paleo style meat & veggie type meal.

    The nutriblast makes it SO easy for me- i can prepare both 24oz servings in the morning (mainly veggies (some I used to NEVER touch- hello kale, chard, cauliflower, broccoli, ginger, turmeric root) then fruits then flax, chia, almonds), put them on ice in an insulated lunch sack and have my meals for the day. I bring along an apple, celery, carrots, hummus for snacks, and drink mint tea. If I am too busy at work I can save my juice and drink it on my 1hr+ commute to home or the barn.

    It has taken the cooking aspect completely out of the equation. I dont have to worry about what i'm bringing to work, how much room it'll take up in the fridge there, or when i'll be home to eat my next meal. So so easy, and delicious.

    Best of all- all those veggies and fruits I thought were giving me problems have given me ZERO issues. I was hugely skeptical at first, and downright scared to blend in some of my known trigger foods. But, it was a non issue.

    The dinners I do eat are paleo style. I do still eat meat, fish, chicken. I do eat roasted veggies- roasted brussel sprouts, squash, onion, carrots are my favorite combo) I don't eat grains, or dairy. Every now and then I'll sneak some cheese- like on superbowl sunday.

    This has been the longest I've been able to follow a healthier diet without falling off and running back to my bread pantry.

    So I guess my advice, while I'm not following Paleo per se- is to perhaps go at it from a different angle if at first it doesn't work for you. You may be surprised at where you end up!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by grayarabpony View Post
    Probably because he no longer had the flora in his gut to digest the wheat, or something else was wrong with the pizza.
    Believe that if you wish. Try it sometime...give it up for a few weeks and then try to eat it again. I think wheat is equal to poison..particularly the newer strains that are physically addictive and act like an opiate on your brain. It at least rates a warning on the label like tobacco.

    I don't think anyone has to do anything just because I feel this way but I do think people should be informed of what damage can be caused by wheat and not blatantly lied to that it's actually good for you and recommended as part of a healthy diet. It's not...never has been for human beings...and it's worse now that ever before due to modern hybridization techniques.

    If someone really wants to eat wheat, at least try and find and use the heirloom varieties like Einkorn and Emmer or Spelt that are the "old"' varieties that are no where near as damaging. It's been said by many that most gluten sensitive people can eat these older varieties as it's the "new" wheat they are sensitized to. I tried Spelt some years ago and it was not as bad but I still found it irritated my bowel...now I have no desire to eat it.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    30,669

    Default

    can we get back on topic please, which would be ME?

    any tips on how to feed my butter?




    sorry...

    I could not resist.


    Chill people... you make it sound like food was a matter of life and death, SHEESH!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post

    Chill people... you make it sound like food was a matter of life and death, SHEESH!

    Sorry! But to me and my health issues, it IS a matter of life and death. I mean that...no hype...thanks to my health issues from eating wheat for years, I'm much more susceptible to all kinds of cancer and "complications." I think looking at America's weight problem also and all that leads to, food, what we eat, is a serious matter as well. I tend to get a bit edgy about it so sorry for the sidetracking.

    OK, back to your topic now.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2000
    Posts
    1,089

    Default

    I wonder how an already thin person would do on a diet like this. My weight is fine- I'm a person who can eat a ton, including a ton of carbs, and never gain weight- but I do feel bloated sometimes and I wish my stomach was flatter. And I do feel kind of addicted to certain foods- all carbs of course. I've been tempted in the past to try a paleo-type diet, but I wonder if I would lose weight and lose all of my energy. Plus I really dont like meat very much- the taste of it, and then the ethics- thinking of eating a dead animal. Actually, nothing is grosser to me than a steak, especially a rare one, I cant even watch someone eat it. These types of diets make sense to me, especially for overweight people, but I dont know if I could do it.



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    the evergreen state!
    Posts
    1,253

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by saratoga View Post
    I wonder how an already thin person would do on a diet like this.
    I am sure there are stories like this - but one blog I do follow is marksdailyapple.com Every friday he posts success stories...and I do remember one about a gal who didn't have any weight to lose, per se:

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/you-c...#axzz2K5IjFzzQ

    But, in searching for this- there seem to be quite a few!


    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/categ...#axzz2K5IjFzzQ



  12. #52
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    I can be off of simple carbs for a week and then one dinner will throw me into a tailspin, just like the pizza example. And I notice it in the family too-I'm the cook and the mom so I have a close connection to all this. We generally have no simple carbs in the house and very little wheat of any kind-we do meat, potatoes, dairy, fats and vegetables for the most part. And when we're just doing that we are happy and healthy, no energy spikes, no stomach problems.

    And we don't go months without carbs and yet we never eat out, I do 99% of our cooking and if we have a lapse it's with store bought pasta, or store bought pizza crust, or something from the grocery store. Never eat out, don't even have a fast food restaurant in the town. But if we have a carby meal (spaghetti, pasta dish, pizza dish, potato soup) we can sure tell.

    I guess you could blame the cursed raw milk we drink every day but strangely enough if we don't eat the dang simple carbs we're happy and healthy. But we're humans in the culture and we keep relapsing and having things like nachos.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    30,669

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    Sorry! But to me and my health issues, it IS a matter of life and death. I mean that...no hype...thanks to my health issues from eating wheat for years, I'm much more susceptible to all kinds of cancer and "complications." I think looking at America's weight problem also and all that leads to, food, what we eat, is a serious matter as well. I tend to get a bit edgy about it so sorry for the sidetracking.

    OK, back to your topic now.
    ah, I am no good at my usual wit today!

    ^_^

    you know how it is...you wean the dog off food, then the critter keels over, right!

    foods can have devastating effects, no doubt. Thankfully the majority of people can graze the field.
    And in this day and age, I do believe the choices are even worse for those with different needs. we are really lacking diversity!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  14. #54

    Default Let Thy Food be Thy Medicine

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    Chill people... you make it sound like food was a matter of life and death, SHEESH!
    Well...considering that you are what you eat, it is a matter of life and death. When people eat the SAD (Standard American Diet), which is essentially empty calories, their bodies slowly waste away from the lack of nutrients. This is going to be my first attempt at condensing 100s upon 100s of hours of reading/studying/turning myself into an experiment into a forum post. I apologize for the length.

    I ate the SAD. Grains and sometimes sugar at breakfast, grains in the form of a sandwich along with a Coke (High Fructose Corn Syrup HFCS) for lunch, and some sort of meat with a side of grains and potentially more HFCS for dinner. Evening snacks were popcorn (grains), ice cream (HFCS), crackers (grains)...I think you get the idea. Doctors considered my weight fine, I am 5'7”, a medium build and was maintaining 145-150 lbs. As I reached my 30s, I started to notice changes. My head seemed foggy, my memory seemed not as sharp, I had little aches and pains here and there, thinning hair and of course wrinkles starting to crop up. I've been an athlete my entire life and just figured this is the process of aging and I am starting to pay for years of being active. Look at the literature, there are tons of articles prepping you for how you will feel as you age. You are conditioned to just accept it as it comes along.

    Then, around 31, I started to have heart palpitations and dizzy spells. The doctor said it was panic attacks and wanted to put me on meds. This began round 1 of how I learned to not trust the medical establishment. I don't take meds and told them I am perfectly fine mentally. I then ordered them to run blood tests. Well, lo and behold, my Iron was dangerously low. Low Iron causes all of the symptoms I was having. So, I concentrated on eating high Iron foods. After a year, my stored Iron didn't budge, although my other iron level ticked up a touch which alleviated some of the symptoms. However, this should have raised all sorts of warning bells with my doctors that there was something wrong. But no, their solution was to suggest taking iron pills. I was determined to solve it through food and not pills. A bit over a year ago, I started to notice slight digestive issues, until last May I was having full blown digestive problems. I gave it about 8 weeks before I was ready to try anything to make it all stop. My doctor sent me to a GI specialist. All the tests came up normal. Then he ran the Celiac panel. All of my numbers were ridiculously high which meant they didn't even have to do an endoscopy to confirm Celiac disease. So, finally in mid-Augst I had my answer. The anemia was the first sign. What was the doctor's remedy...Gluten Free.

    Now, armed with a diagnosis, I set out to completely understand this disease. The engineer in me kept saying that humans have been eating wheat for 1000s of years, why all of a sudden this spike in gluten issues? Then comes round 2 of how I learned to not trust the medical establishment. Celiac disease means you have an intestinal tract in disarray. A study conducted by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., suggests celiac disease is almost five times more common today than it was 50 years ago -- and that if the disease goes undiagnosed, it is associated with nearly quadrupled mortality rates. Furthermore, another Mayo Clinic study was conducted on 241 adults, 176 of whom were women with an average age of 47. The participants were confirmed as having celiac disease and the group had follow-up biopsies 2 and 5 years after their initial diagnosis. Dr Murray, a long-time researcher in the field of gluten intolerance, reported that in 57% of adult celiacs, tissue damage persisted after 5 years of adherence to a gluten-free diet. In an effort to evaluate the effect of persistent intestinal damage on long-term health he concluded that regardless of age or sex, adults with celiac disease whose intestinal tissues healed were less likely to die from all causes than were men and women with persistent damage.

    I was fuming after learning the truth about the gluten free remedy. My doctor essentially handed me a probable death sentence. He didn't suggest any additional treatment, diet changes or other ways of healing my gut. So, I fired him as my doctor and set on a quest to conquer Celiac disease. I spent 100s of hours studying diets, nutrition, about sugar, starches, the contents of grains, how gut absorption takes place, about auto-immune responses, zonulin, proteins, the role fat plays in the body, the liver, and more. I decided to use myself and my mom (confirmed Celiac and colitis sufferer) as test subjects. I settled on a base diet, the SCD (Specific Carbohydrate Diet) and mixed it up with other tidbits I learned. SCD is similar to Paleo, no grains, no potatoes, low starch, no sugar except for honey. My blood work had been run, full panels were taken during the summer, I continued eating gluten after the diagnosis to make sure I knew exactly when changes would take place.

    On 9/20/12 I started the diet. By this time, I was at 130 lbs. I had slowly lost weight through the beginning of the year and then quickly lost weight when the symptoms became severe due to poor nutrient absorption. The diet starts with nothing but homemade chicken soup, beef patties, bananas and diluted apple cider or grape juice with no sugar. If one can tolerate eggs, those can be hard boiled. The premise is you are trying to intake only the easiest to digest foods since your gut is compromised. After 3-5 days of the intro diet, you can start adding foods in one by one every few days. This gives you a clean slate to work from and the ability to discern if a particular food is bothering you. I found further literature that helped with the order of re-introducing foods from easy to digest to harder to digest. I also read about how much energy the body needs to heal itself. There is no counting calories, you eat as much as your body is telling you to eat. At first, it wasn't much because my body was used to me trying to stifle its appetite. However, within a few days my hunger ramped up because my body wasn't getting any “quick energy” and had to start figuring out how to utilize proteins and fats.

    I became ravenous and I was eating thousands of calories a day, here was my typical day, all food is homemade except for yogurt and juice:
    Breakfast – 1 plus cup of full fat yogurt, 1 banana, 2 eggs, 2 sausage patties, 1 cup of baked butternut squash, a tall glass of diluted apple cider
    Snack – Hard boiled egg, a tall glass of diluted grape juice
    Lunch – Large bowl of chicken soup with the fat in it, 1 to 2 beef patties, pearsauce or applesauce or leftover cooked veggies, water with lemon
    Dinner – 1.5 to 2 lbs of fish and beef or half a chicken including all fat and skin, along with half a plate of a cooked veggie cooked in butter, another side veggie or soup
    Snack – Aged cheese, almond/coconut milk, bone broth, apple/nut butters

    Meanwhile, even when eating as much food as I could tolerate, my weight kept dropping rapidly until I finally bottomed out at 119 lbs, which was far to skinny for my height and build. However, within three weeks all of my symptoms were gone. Within about 5 weeks after starting the diet I noticed my head was clear, I had no more aches and pains and I had zero of the anemia symptoms. In fact, I felt better than I did when I was a teenager. People started commenting on my thick shiny hair. People said I looked like I was aging in reverse. Wrinkles were fading, cellulite was disappearing and my muscles were becoming defined all without going to the gym. I didn't have time to workout. My skin took on a glow I didn't know was possible, my joints were more flexible and my energy levels went through the roof. I was worried that once my gut started working I would balloon up. Well, when the body is fed properly it acts accordingly and does what it is supposed to do as well as rev up the metabolism. Without all the gluten, starches and sugars, my brain was actually able to coordinate properly with my gut. My appetite slowly decreased as I gained weight and then both my appetite and weight leveled off at 125 to 128 lbs. Exactly where I wanted to be.

    I found a new doctor through a friend's recommendation. I was direct with him on my consultation visit and told him I need someone to bounce ideas off of and to order tests I deemed necessary. He was happy to help a patient who actually took her health seriously. The first round of blood tests took place mid December, less than 3 months after starting the diet. I also ran a test on my Zonulin levels at the end of December to get a baseline on my gut permeability. My iron had finally edged up to almost the bottom side of normal, just through diet. My cholesterol, which the previous doctor had declared as disgustingly good, got surprisingly better. Triglycerides from 65 to 31, HDL from 49 to 83, VLDL 11 to 6, LDL 83 to 60, the total 145 to 149 and that is with eating 4 plus eggs a day. Eggs are actually very good for you. The best part was the Celiac numbers. Deamidated Gliadin IgA 126 to 37, IgG 103 to 89, tTG >100 to 90. That last number is the best one. At first it doesn't look like much of a drop, however this lab only tests to 100. Most Celiacs', with my symptoms, true numbers are in the 300 to 400s. Doctors won't even order that blood test for at least 6 months after going gluten free because that number just doesn't drop. Many people won't see it drop below 100 for years. Yet, I dropped my number below 100 in less than 3 months. Did I do this by going just gluten free...NO! The only way I was able to achieve such dramatic progress was by cutting out inflammation promoting foods.

    What is the common thing these foods all have...they are either sugars or break down into sugars. Sugar is at the root of the dramatic rise in human diseases. It was never meant to be eaten on the scale that modern society consumes it. And, modern day Dwarf wheat developed in the last 50 years plays right into this. The first major difference of this dwarf wheat as compared to Einkorn, the heirloom wheat, is that it contains very high levels of a starch called amylopectin A. Two slices of whole wheat bread now raise your blood sugar more than two tablespoons of table sugar. Einkorn will only raise it by a small fraction. Dwarf wheat contains 42 chromosomes as compared to Einkorn's 14 chromosomes. 50 years is no where near enough time for humans to evolve to digest this genetically complex modern wheat. It also contains more gluten than Einkorn and Dwarf wheat's gluten has a different structure. Einkorn wheat also appears to lack gliadin toxicity. Dwarf wheat's gliadin is an opiate producer in the human body which is why people are addicted to wheat. Daydream Believer's post on modern wheat is spot on. Big Ag is creating more and more of these Frankenfoods and we are just starting to see the tip of the iceberg of the ill effects these foods are causing.

    I am continuing my self experiment. I kind of fell off the bandwagon over the holidays and have been eating a little sugar, corn and potatoes, although obviously no gluten. My schedule became hectic and made it difficult to keep up with the cooking. I am going to get back on it shortly. My goal is to zero out all of the Celiac levels. Once I do that, I will start eating Einkorn wheat and see what happens. I will have to run blood tests to see if I am having any asymptomatic issues with the wheat. My mom was a tougher case due to having two GI issues and dealing with her issues for decades. However, I did finally get rid of her symptoms after 2 months by tweaking her diet. This is something her doctors couldn't achieve in all the years they were treating her.

    I realized through all of this that what you learn about aging and food through mainstream channels is all a lie. You don't have to have pain as you age. You can control the inflammation in your body all through diet. Your body needs the right foods to fuel you, to heal you, and to fight for you. Just because you can eat a food without noticeable issues, doesn't mean you should. Everyone should be concerned with the effects of everything they put into their body. My Celiac diagnosis was the best thing to happen to me. It no doubt, lengthened my life span and greatly increased my future quality of life. It shouldn't take a disease diagnosis to encourage people to finally think about food. I am working on a blog where I will go into all of this is greater detail, there is so much more than I can post here including more information, where to find literature, recipes I have gathered from others.
    Last edited by Sporthorse Shop; Feb. 6, 2013 at 12:05 AM. Reason: removing spaces


    13 members found this post helpful.

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    30,669

    Default

    well, you mist the wink and the grin...

    I mean, there are only three major objections in life:
    Eat, sleep and canoeing.

    and eating takes precedence over the other two

    And I appologize for my pathetic and selfish attempt to take the harshness out of the discussion.

    Because, well it is about me, my ADOS and the failure to read the 8 plus books on my desk instead of playing on the net.

    you know... CLIFF NOTES

    We have made many leaps in the last generation or two our caveman brains are not equipped for. GMOs are really not even the tip of the iceberg.

    It is kind of rude though to tell another person how that person feels/is supposed to feel eaten X, Y or Z.
    Personal milleage is a huge difference.


    not everybody can tollerate this diet or that diet...not sure if I could get DH on paleo....he takes medication and is watching his intake of greens like a hawk! That deep vein trombosis is not something I need to revisit, so I leave him be.

    had a neighbor, she could not tollerate grains other than corn and rice.
    A lady I know now is highly allergic to corn...high fructose corn syrup gives her a ravaging migraine...and that was with just a few sips. Now avoid cornsyrup these days!

    20 years ago the fad was to eat nearly all fruit...my mom hailed the book to me as the next best thing.. then I bought it...a year later she was like 'meh' serious lady?!

    In any case, the thread was started with a it of a lighthearted twinkle...I had a few questions.

    but in the end, you can't take life too serious, you won't make it out alive....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  16. #56
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Great post Sporthorse Shop. It's glad to hear from others who have walked a similar path to my own and have really done their research. Best of luck with your Einkorn trials. Please let me know when you have your blog up and running...I'd love to follow it.

    Alagirl...sorry if I misunderstood your intent. I do get a bit intense at times and this is one of my trigger subjects that will set me off. I hope you can understand why now after reading SS's well written post. There are many of us very let down by the medical establishment and when you really come to the conclusion of just how wrong much of their supposedly educated scientific advice truly is, you lose all faith in them. I was mistreated for IBS for most of my life and still had to pay for the danged Celiac test on my own as the Dr. said I wasn't "sick enough" to have Celiac. God knows what that's cost me. I have no idea why DR's are so reluctant to do anything but pass out pills these days but it will be the death of many of us that results.

    I sure hope your find your answers. I'll chill out on your topic and go pester someone else. I have another day of trims ahead so I won't be on till this afternoon and this will probably be closed by then. Take Care!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    30,669

    Default

    Nah, hang around. I do appreciate everybody's input.

    I do understand the frustration, had my own runaround in terms of food related issues, although to a much lesser degree and less threatening.

    You guys who have changed your lifestyle can speak from experience as to what works, what doesn't, etc. valuable info for those picking up the first book and looking down on the list, topped by coconut oil of all things. I do not believe I have ever seen it in a store!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  18. #58
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2007
    Location
    Camden, DE
    Posts
    1,948

    Default

    When I completely cut meat out of my diet many years ago and came back to it I did get sick. So, I do feel like there is some validity in the statement that if you eliminate a certain food group from your diet long enough when you go back it is possible to have ill effects. That being said, I don't think the modern day wheat is any good.

    The problem I have with the Paleo thing is that I don't like meat. I generally don't enjoy the texture, taste, eating an animal, and the risks associated with eating meat. Granted, those risks do decline somewhat if you raise your own meat or get them from a good source. I do think I would eat more meat if I raised my own, and I intend to someday. I struggle with the meat eating and I feel like I'm just bad a preparing meat too. If faced with cooking meat or grabbing raw veggies and tossing them in a bowl for a salad, I'll do the latter. I will ask SO every once in awhile to prepare me some meat to put on top of my salad that I can store in the fridge and go to for a few days, but I feel like the meat ruins my salad

    I do feel like the empty void I get from not eating meat often can be filled with carbs if I don't pay attention. I know how crappy carbs in the form of bread, crackers, whatever make me feel though so I do really stay away. I can notice a difference in my workout and stamina if I have a carb heavy dinner the night before, so I don't.

    My point is, I know this Paleo diet works for some, but sometimes you have to make modifications that work for you or it just doesn't work. I want to eat healthy and stay active since it makes me feel better and enhances my quality of life. And I do that. I just don't want to drive myself crazy with it.

    I will add that ditching the carbs is much easier after you get over the "withdrawal period" as I call it. Once the cravings go away in a few weeks things get better. I relapsed a month or so ago and had to go back to carb rehab, but I'm fine now Cutting out/down on carbs really does work. Helps with that stubborn belly fat too, I find. I do think we need to get away from the processed heavy carb/bread and whatever else American diet.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2007
    Posts
    347

    Default

    Alagirl,
    If you'd like to try the diet, but just a trial run with an end in sight then I suggest doing the whole30 challenge. Husband and I are now on our 2nd back to back whole30 because we really like it and the benefits of feeling good and weight loss are amazing. Plus, there is a forum that you can join and log your daily process. Anyway, go to www.whole9.com to check it out.
    I highly recommend it. Its really NOT a diet for losing weight but a diet to get the ca-ca out of your system. There is lots of good food to eat and you won't be hungry! Even though its not touted as a weight loss diet I lost about 8lb so far and husband has lost 15.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    30,669

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NEWT View Post
    Alagirl,
    If you'd like to try the diet, but just a trial run with an end in sight then I suggest doing the whole30 challenge. Husband and I are now on our 2nd back to back whole30 because we really like it and the benefits of feeling good and weight loss are amazing. Plus, there is a forum that you can join and log your daily process. Anyway, go to www.whole9.com to check it out.
    I highly recommend it. Its really NOT a diet for losing weight but a diet to get the ca-ca out of your system. There is lots of good food to eat and you won't be hungry! Even though its not touted as a weight loss diet I lost about 8lb so far and husband has lost 15.
    Japanese snowboarding?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Paleo Diet
    By mayhew in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: May. 29, 2012, 08:24 PM
  2. Anyone read The Paleo Solution?
    By fivesocks in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Feb. 5, 2012, 11:07 PM
  3. Paleo diet?
    By MyGiantPony in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Nov. 1, 2011, 06:45 PM
  4. Anyone else eating Paleo?
    By TheJenners in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: Apr. 24, 2011, 12:44 PM
  5. Anyone else do Crossfit and/or Paleo?
    By MissCapitalSplash in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: Dec. 30, 2010, 11:28 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •