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  1. #61
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    No doubt japanese snowboarding burns some calories. However, I meant to send you to www.whole9life.com


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  2. #62
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    It's actually http://whole9life.com/
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    Alagirl...sorry if I misunderstood your intent. I do get a bit intense at times and this is one of my trigger subjects that will set me off. I hope you can understand why now after reading SS's well written post.
    I get the same intensity, because the whole process was so frustrating. It would have been much easier if the original doctor could have pointed me to a website that gave a clear road to recovery that actually worked. I have had so many people ask for information after seeing how dramatically different I looked and a few started the SCD even though they didn't have gluten issues. They experienced the same benefits I did. These "diets" are actually lifestyle changes. They change the way you think about food and how it plays into your life. I am not one of those fanatics who says you have to follow it verbatim or don't bother. If you can adopt some of the changes, you will experience benefits. My SO still has his sandwiches and chicken fried steak, however his achy feet and joints in the morning went away, his bloating decreased and his energy levels increased. He is tempted to try the diet fully just because he was amazed at how much better he felt being partially on it.

    With my mom, I kept tweaking her foods and she slowly healed. However, her improvement stalled with lingering symptoms. I continued reading and researching and found that colitis sufferers often find relief with rice. Rice is strictly forbidden, however it wasn't going to hurt to try and I tend to think outside of the box. Within a week of her starting rice, the final symptoms disappeared. My thoughts are that the good bacteria in her gut needed some sort of easy energy and the rice provided it. So, no one should take a diet as the final word on what they eat. Every individual is different and their diet should be tweaked to suit their own body's needs. However, at the core, sugar is bad. And anything that converts to sugar has to be kept to a minimum or you will definitely keep the vicious cycle of inflammation alive in your body.

    My gut instinct says that anyone who is eating even a smidgen of the Standard American Diet has gut and inflammation issues, even if they don't know it. People become accustomed to how they feel and are conditioned to think its normal. After reviewing my blood work, I came to the conclusion that the normal ranges for many of the parameters are actually unhealthy ranges. We have become such a sick and diseased ravaged nation that those ranges are the new normal.


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  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtyMax View Post
    For those that do Paleo/Primal, what does your day look like?

    I love nomnompaleo for ideas. Before the holidays, I spent a few weeks eating mostly Paleo (to fit into my show boots) and loved how I felt. On top of feeling great, I'm a T1 diabetic and my rollercoaster up/down days went away. But OMG, the planning required to eat well was very difficult for me. And as long as I cook dinner its no biggie, but if my husband cooks? For get about no grains/flours.

    So, I'd love to hear what everyone eats during a day or week.

    You guys have motivated me to get back on a plan. Thanks!
    I can't claim to be hard-core Paleo because I still do dairy, mostly because I can get fabulous raw milk direct from 3 cows I know personally. I'm also a cheese lover. We have our own chickens, and I'm buying locally-grown, grass-fed beef.
    Here's a typical day:

    7:30 AM
    Breakfast: 4 slices uncured bacon and 2 home-raised eggs from our own chickens with a cup of tea. Hits the spot, without question. Never get tired of it and look forward to it every morning as soon as I wake up. Fire up the griddle!

    10:30 AM
    Coffee Break after morning chores: Coffee with raw milk cream, handful of nuts if
    I want them but most days no need, just the java.

    (2-3 PM as I'm not even hungry until then)
    Lunch: Green salad with snow peas, mushrooms, cherry tomatoes, maybe a small cucumber and half a dozen olives, as well as a little uncured turkey, ham, or cut-up chicken cutlet. Spritz of olive oil, vinegar & sea salt. This is my main meal of the day. Water, raw milk or tea.

    8:30 PM (after PM chores)
    Meat or fish with green vegetable, glass of raw milk. Small portions. Big fat spoonful of Cod Liver Oil for the groovy Omega-3's. Lots of butter on everything!

    10:00 PM Nightcap: Mixed cocktail, or small glass of brandy or wine. (You're better off with most cocktails; wine's full of sugar, so I'm careful!)

    I completely avoid anything processed or involving flour, sugar, or vegetable oils except for olive oil. The craving for sweets went away about a month after I started, and if I eat cake-and-ice-cream at a birthday I now feel sick for 2 days.
    Ditto to what everyone else says about increased energy, ambition, even better sleep. Wheat is the WORST--banish it entirely, we didn't evolve to eat that stuff!

    Great info. at www.westonaprice.org.


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  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    the food pyramid was abolished by its creators some years ago as utter nonsense and guaranteed to create fat, unhealthy people- which it did. They replaced it with "my plate" which is sort of a step towards a better diet, but is heavily criticized. Many people feel the dairy industry and other industries influenced it more than actual nutritional science.

    But essentially the human body has adapted over millions of years to live on a diet from which about half of calories come from vegetables and the other half come from lean game animals or fish, with very few calories coming from high-carb items like fruits, potatoes, grains, legumes. Dairy is a relatively recent invention, and most of the human population can't digest it at all.

    It's only VERY recently in the history of the human body that grains became widely available, and the unhealthy impact of a grain-based diet has been obvious in both recent times and in the archeological record. Grains are eaten as a source of calories in times when immediately starving to death due to lack of calories is much more important than worrying about long-term health. We don't have that concern today, so there is no reason to eat grains. Unless you're really broke and are actually concerned about starving to death tomorrow.

    I eat paleo and find it to be very easy to follow, not restrictive at all, and it makes you feel so much better than eating a regular carb-laden type diet. In fact, I find a good paleo diet is far less restrictive than a regular carb-laden diet- instead of filling up on boring, bland pasta or rice you eat a wide variety of tasty foods instead.

    Instead of focusing on "what not to eat", focus on WHAT TO EAT: eat lots of vegetables. Eat lots of fish. Eat lots of lean meats. Eat nuts. Play around with produce you've never even heard of before, and check out paleo recipes. You'll find you don't miss the other stuff at all.
    And don't worry about the weird details- I don't use coconut oil myself, I just use olive oil. Tried and true to be healthy, not so sure about the coconut oil. If I want to eat a few beans, or have a sandwich, I do. I just try to make sure the majority of my diet is vegetables and meat instead of other stuff.
    The meat does NOT have to be lean (but good luck finding any that isn't.) In the Ice Age, based on fossil record we ate "the fattest meat we could kill," and the fattest parts of the animal preferentially--including organ meats. Lions and other predators still eat that way today--the lean muscle meats are left for scavengers!
    People like the Inuit ate vast amounts of blubber (100% animal fat) without the slightest indication of heart disease or cancer UNTIL THE FLOUR AND SUGAR GOT THERE with early missionaries. In EVERY case of indigenous tribes, those were the 2 factors that caused the major "Western diseases." The whole idea that natural, saturated animal fats cause "cholesterol" and heart disease was the product of Ancel Keyes' cherry-picked "data" in the Framingham Study--which is now used as an example of how NOT to "do science." Unfortunately, this has yet to trickle down to a public that's been beaten over the head with "fats are bad" every day for the last 50 years.

    The carbs in your diet should be replaced with FATS--and watch while you get thin! If you go to Gary Taubes' website, he's got an entry there where he tells you what he really eats and what his blood-lipid "numbers" are--and they will knock you out of your chair! NO amount of exercise can compensate for an incorrect diet for our species.


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  6. #66
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    The other thing I think we do have to consider is where our meat comes from. Nowadays a majority of meat is raised in undesirable conditions, is fed god knows what, and injected with hormones.


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  7. #67
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    exactly. Bacon good, low-fat rice cakes bad. We all know that instinctively, don't we? turns out your instincts were spot-on.
    There was even a study showing that eating a low-fat diet re-set your metabolism such that you burned fewer calories at rest= the less fat you eat, the fatter you get. Dietary fat is good for you, it's what your body is designed to run on. Not on sugar. But the fat in wild animals is very different than the fat in grain-fed factory farmed animals- if eating out of the grocery store instead of the woods, I would choose lean cuts.

    One thing that turns people off paleo is the quibbling about specific foods- did cavemen eat this or not? but that's just silly. None of the food sources we have today even remotely resembles the foods our ancestors ate. Do you really think those super-sweet apples or huge sweet strawberries existed before we modified their genetics by breeding? nope. Do you think the meat from one of the deformed severely genetically modified (by breeding) turkeys even remotely resembles the meat from wild birds? nope. And there is no way most of us are going to be able or willing to go out and actually look for wild foods. So quibbling about what specific foods to eat or not eat based on what the caveman ate is kind of a waste of time.

    So the thing to do is consider the general principles of eating properly, and before deciding to incorporate a particular foodstuff into your diet, just look it up and see what, exactly, that food item might contribute to your health. I like this database: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/2203/2

    it has pretty graphics at the bottom that tell you everything you need to know. You want to avoid eating inflammatory foods if possible, and eat foods that are high in various nutrients per calorie (nutrient dense). You only need to eat carbohydrates if you are too thin, so avoid foods high in carbohydrates. They mostly just contribute calories and not much else to the diet. Unless you need more calories, no reason to eat them. You want to eat lots and lots of vegetables because they are packed with nutrients and fiber. You need protein and fat.

    If you look up cheese, you may see no reason to reject it, as long you're one of the few who can digest dairy. Full of protein and fat. If you look up beans, you will probably want to reject them- full of carbs, poor-quality incomplete protein source, difficult to digest, no other redeeming features.


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  8. #68

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    As mentioned above, FATS are good for you, as well as organ meats and bones if you can soften them enough. These all have essential nutrients that keep your gut healthy. Here are some tips and tricks for those considering starting this lifestyle. I understand it is daunting. I work a regular 5 day a week job along with a 2 hour round trip commute. I have horses at home, so there is not a lot of time leftover for cooking. I had to figure out how to make it work every single day even with my schedule.

    The key for me was a freezer. I am not wealthy and had to buy meat on sale. I stocked up and learned how to organize a chest freezer. Of course I can't take a slab of meat to work. So, on the weekends in the beginning I prepared lots of food. I formed beef patties and froze them. The trick is to form the patties, throw them on plates in the freezer. After they set up then, bag them together. They won't stick. I made 5 lbs of homemage sausage at a time and did the same thing as the beef patties. I was able to pull these out frozen and cook them in the mornings for breakfast. I made kafta which is a mix of ground beef, lamb, onions and spices formed into a log. I froze those. These were great for dinners that I didn't have time to prepare and didn't want another beef patty. I made huge stock pots of chicken soup and froze those into smaller containers. I made large crock pot portions of bone broth and froze those into smaller containers. I made my own nut butters and froze them. I canned applesauce, pearsauce and tomato paste for ease of use later. In fact I made a homemade kick a$$ bbg sauce for the superbowl with my paste. In one weekend in Oct I steamed pie pumpkins and froze the puree. It made the pumpkin desserts easy over the holidays. I still have puree to use. I made large batches of coconut milk and froze it. I bought bananas in bulk, let them become spotty and froze them. Coconut milk, 2 frozen bananas and a tbl of almond or cashew butter in a blender equals heaven. Coconut milk, 2 frozen bananas, pie spice, honey and apple cider in a blender equals apple pie in a shake form.

    For meals, it does involve a bit of pre planning. You have to pull the meat out of the freezer in time to thaw. I use a toaster oven for the majority of meat cooking since there is just 2 of us and it is faster and more energy efficient than an oven. Once a week I made crock pot chicken on Wednesdays. This is the double ad day at sprouts, so I needed a dinner that took no time from me to cook. This recipe is seriously easier than a frozen packaged meal and it tastes amazing:
    http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/201...n-a-crock-pot/
    Since I work all day, I set my crockpot to low at 7 am and let it cook for 11-12 hours. The chicken will be drowning in juice by that time and the bones are soft enough to eat. I made chicken stock out of the leftover juices.

    Cheddar bay biscuits just like red lobster without the wheat:
    http://mrsedsresearchandrecipes.blog...rolls-scd.html
    These can be made in batches and froze. They seriously taste better than the wheat version. These are so easy to make. I sub butter in for the oil. I like butter! One trick is once you place them on a cookie sheet, throw them in the freezer for 5 mins then bake. They will retain their shape that way.

    Squash is easy to make and tastes great. Twice baking it seems to work the best. Try this with acorn squash or buttercup squash. Cut in half, scoop out the insides. Set on a cookie sheet squash open sides down. Add a bit of water to the pan. Cook at 350 to 375 for 45 mins or so until squash is soft. Scoop out insides into a bowl. Add yogurt or coconut milk or milk, a pat of butter, a tablespoon of honey, salt. Puree using beaters or even those single glass beating machines. You can just eat it at this point, but the best is to put in a baking dish or if you want to be fancy back in the squash shells, top with asiago or parmesan cheese and bake for 20 mins. You can make in large batches and freeze this.

    Speaking of honey, honey is not just honey. I have become a bit of a honey connoisseur. Early in the diet, I tried baking some simple almond cookies with just a regular jar of honey from the store. Those are usually a wildflower. The cookies tasted like honey and I am NOT a honey fan. I was very concerned that I would not be able to stick to this diet without a sweet treat. I then researched honey and found out it comes in a HUGE variety of types. The rule of thumb is the lighter the color of the honey, the less of a "honey" taste it has. Also, it doesn't go bad, so you can stock up. In my pantry I have the following:
    Wildflower - best for meats or strong tastes
    Clover - good for sweetening entrees such as cranberry relish, the above squash
    Acacia - subtle flavor good for baking
    Alfalfa - subtle flavor good for baking
    Mesquite - no honey flavor, just sweet, excellent for baking and homemade margaritas, I make knock your socks off margaritas with lemons from my backyard, key limes and honey for the simple syrup and no one could guess there was honey in them
    Apple - amazing flavor, I can eat this straight, but it was excellent in the cranberry relish for Christmas
    Orange - strong citrus flavor, limited uses
    Cottonwood - subtle flavor good for baking
    Creamed Clover - awesome on the above biscuits

    The trick to getting honey off your measuring spoon or cup is to coat it with oil first. The honey slides right out instead of sticking to everything.

    We seriously eat what amounts to gourmet meals almost every day.



  9. #69
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    I do think you can come closer to the original meats people ate by sticking with grass fed beef or pastured poultry/hogs rather than that from CFO's. I wish...really wish...I had a way to run my hogs free range in some forested land (fenced not loose) and let them fatten the traditional way on mast and natural foods, but I can't...so I try to feed them greens and as varied a diet as I can. I'll give them hay which they tear into with delight. I can't believe a diet of corn/soy (with vitamins added to balance it) all the time can be good for any animal. I feed them cracked eggs I can't sell, kitchen scraps, and pull up old plants from my garden which they love. Being omnivores, they love this.

    Our poultry free ranges...I mean outside...not locked up in a building with a fenced yard but loose. The only birds I keep contained are turkeys because they can get "lost" and end up roosting on the neighbor's porch which is totally NOT cool. They have a nice grassy area to forage in also and get plenty of sunshine and fresh air. I have heritage birds which can mate naturally and I've seen some turkey hanky panky going on out there so soon they will laying eggs and sitting. My hens hatched some poults last year for us too.

    Anyway, I'm digressing...but I do think we can try to simulate a more natural human diet by making smarter choices. It's not always the easy or affordable thing to do but farm eggs from free roaming hens are so much better in both taste and nutrition than anything from a confined hen and it's not that hard to find them. www.localharvest.org is a great way to try to reconnect to local food.

    On removing wheat and watching people heal...I've seen some remarkable turnarounds. My husband is one. He was diagnosed after the Gulf War as Bipolar. Struggled for years to control it and be productive and he managed and did OK...but it was always an issue...stayed on meds for years. He also, about the same time developed chronic eczema on his leg that nothing worked on it. He had that skin problem for over a decade. He goes on Paleo and I mean in less than a month, the skin problem is gone. He's also 100% off his meds now and functioning normally...no more bipolar disorder. His doctors are now saying that maybe he didn't really have it to begin with...rather than give credit to the real cure. Typical for modern medicine to overlook the obvious.

    The brain altering effects of modern wheat is now implicated in bipolar, schizophrenia, ADHD and autism...skin conditions too...acne for example often responds to a wheat free diet. Joint pain/arthritis is another affliction that often improves off wheat as do many autoimmune problems. So many more people are affected than have any idea.


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  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
    The meat does NOT have to be lean (but good luck finding any that isn't.) In the Ice Age, based on fossil record we ate "the fattest meat we could kill," and the fattest parts of the animal preferentially--including organ meats. Lions and other predators still eat that way today--the lean muscle meats are left for scavengers!
    People like the Inuit ate vast amounts of blubber (100% animal fat) without the slightest indication of heart disease or cancer UNTIL THE FLOUR AND SUGAR GOT THERE with early missionaries. In EVERY case of indigenous tribes, those were the 2 factors that caused the major "Western diseases."
    Oh come on, the Inuit were likely not long-lived, and lived and WORKED in very challenging conditions.

    I could point out the ridiculousness of almost every part of this post, but I won't bother. But I will say this:

    Who pays attention to the food pyramid or whatever they're calling it these days?

    and secondly, people eat too much sugar and fat at the same time. Too much of everything.

    I think the biggest mistakes people make when dieting are starving themselves and not taking in enough protein.


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  11. #71
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    We need to have one of these Paleo discussions every week or so to keep me on track. I feel inspired again. Daydream Believer, I think it's so awesome that you raise your animals as free range/natural lifestyle/diet as possible. I need to research farms in my area that do this...might not be any cheaper than the free range organic meats in grocery stores though

    I eat terribly...too many sweets not enough veggies. Last night for dinner I had girl scout cookies and entirely too many fun size candy bar candies.

    I believe in Paleo, it was just so hard to quit the sugars and so dang expensive, I was a failure. But reading this makes me want to try again.


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  12. #72
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    agree with the eat free-range meats and eggs. free-range eggs are SO nutrient-packed vs. factory-farm eggs. Yeah, they cost a little more, but it's worth it.

    It's not hard to eat paleo. I find it not time consuming at all- most of the foods people eat that take a long time to prepare are the ones you shouldn't eat anyway. Think about it- you have to cook the rice for 45 minutes, or spend hours letting the bread rise, vs. 5 minutes to grill the salmon steak. It's just a matter of changing your habits. Breakfast in particular seems to stump many people- they are used to sucking down bowls of grains, or eating baked goods in the car, and the idea of actually eating a real meal for breakfast is puzzling. The only alternative most people can think of is eggs, and then they say they don't want to eat eggs every day because it's boring (even though they happily ate the same breakfast grains every day for years). I usually make my breakfast the night before, while cooking dinner- a quiche, or some chicken and vegetables, or salmon and veg, something- and then just nuke it and eat the next morning. A real, balanced meal for breakfast. Sets you up for the day.

    I agree the diet is expensive- eating cheap rice and pasta and potatoes as the bulk of the diet vs. eating vegetables and free-range meat? no argument there. But medical care is even more expensive. Avoiding expensive prescription drugs and doctor visits by eating good, but expensive food? I choose the food.


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  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by grayarabpony View Post

    Any sudden change in diet can cause digestive upset.

    I'm not arguing that eating vegetables instead of grain is a bad thing, and I think that the best thing to battle hunger is protein, but I honestly do not believe that everyone needs to swear off grains and dairy entirely and forever.
    This. Ask any vegetarian who decides to start eating meat again--they're usually sick for days until their body adjusts. Hence, plenty of vegans preaching about the evils of animal-based diets and how "poisonous" they are, and how are bodies are not designed to digest animal protein.

    Obviously someone with celiac IS going to react to wheat as though it is a poison. This is true of any allergy or sensitivity. I know paleo works for tons of people, who truly do feel healthier, stronger, and more energetic on it. For others, it's just a way to achieve a certain aesthetic look. Either one is fine--do what you want and what works for you. But proclaiming how awful any food group is--outside of something obviously horrid, like high fructose corn syrup or hydrogenated oils--is just tiresome because your "truth" is by no means universal.


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  14. #74
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    but I honestly do not believe that everyone needs to swear off grains and dairy entirely and forever.
    no? the leading cause of death in the US is heart disease. Heart disease is primarily a disease of inflammation and dyslipidemia. Eating grains promotes both. Not eating grains results in dramatic reversals of both inflammation and dyslipidemia.
    another leading disorder in the US is type II diabetes. Guess what causes diabetes in practically every case? yes, eating grains. Guess what cures diabetes? not eating grains.
    Obesity is rampant in the US. Stop eating grains and watch your body fat, especially the belly fat, mysteriously just melt away.
    Inflammatory conditions like arthritis and allergies and odd aches and pains trouble many people. Stop eating inflammatory foods (grains and dairy) and watch these problems reduce in intensity.

    I suppose there are a few individuals with other problems or strange chemistry that won't benefit from a diet with fewer grains in it, but the vast majority of people will.
    Even skeptics admit that grains don't contribute anything to the diet that can't be provided by other foods or are just not needed at all.
    why are people so determined to eat grains? many people act like they are actually addicted to them.


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  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    why are people so determined to eat grains? many people act like they are actually addicted to them.
    Because they taste good. I mean really good fresh baked bread with butter? Few things beat it. It's not about addiction, but enjoyment.

    If it causes problems for you, that's really truly unfortunate. But otherwise, you won't convince me that eating natural grains, full of fiber and other minerals and micro nutrients are in any way bad for you, barring an actual medical condition. And your statement that grains "don't contribute anything to the diet that can't be provided by other foods" could also be said of meat. Like I mentioned earlier, just start a die-hard vegan about the evils of animal-based diets. They sound a lot like you do, believe it just as fervently, and back it up with facts, science, and evolutionary history.
    Last edited by Natalie; Feb. 6, 2013 at 04:06 PM.


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  16. #76
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    Its not just saying goodbye to grains - it is changing your lifestyle. Along with the grains, the pre-made, pre-packaged stuff that is grab & go that takes no time to prepare at all, is what you also must swear off. I'm not talking about just oreos and pop tarts. Gone are the days you can just grab a protein bar if you are running late, or a pre-packaged salad that may have naughty dressing. Believe me, prior to my diet changes, i was not sitting in the kitchen waiting for my dough to rise or rice to cook. I was going out and buying it already made.

    Breakfast was/is still a challenge for me. Less now that I just drink it. But I've always had a bad reaction to eggs, and we dont eat pork as a family. But now i'm wondering, since i've sort of reset myself, and knowing that the fruits and veggies that used to upset my stomach no longer do... maybe it is time i try a hardboiled egg.



  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    why are people so determined to eat grains? many people act like they are actually addicted to them.
    They are addictive. Wheat is literally so with the opiate like effect on your brain and it's a powerful appetite stimulant. The other grains, while not acting like a drug as wheat does, are just potent doses of carbs that spike your blood sugar and make you hungrier.

    Natalie,

    I don't know if you read all the posts or not but go back and read mine and read what Sporthorse Shop wrote. Many many people are sensitive to wheat/gluten and have no idea or they suffer from other problems that are directly related to wheat intake and damage. You don't have to have Celiac Disease to have wheat issues...you can even test negative on the blood tests and STILL be sensitive..many people do and finally figure it out by doing an elimination diet. Go back and read what I wrote about my husband...he never had ANY idea he had "issues" with wheat. No DR ever suggested as much but he cut it out and no more depression meds, no more eczema, and lost 40 lbs. Nothing short of miraculous. He was never even considered for gluten related issues and had plenty of medical care.

    While I believe you have the right to eat anything you wish, seriously try and open your mind to this a bit. There is a TON of research out there on wheat in particular and the more you read of study after study showing how damaging it is, the more you wonder about the absolute BS being fed to us about how we need our wheat for fiber, etc...ad nauseum. There is absolutely NOTHING in wheat that you can't get from another much healthier source...NOTHING. It's NOT good for you...it's not good for anyone. It's a new addition to the human diet from an evolutionary perspective...at most 10,000 years ago and to many Europeans more like 2500 years...to some populations like Native Americans, it's maybe 200-300 years. We've not even had time to genetically adapt to the original types of wheat not even considering the new dwarf varieties which are very different from the old types.

    Add to the nasty effects we've already discussed, grains are highly acid producing and full of phytates that block mineral absorption. Did you ever wonder why so many American women have osteoporosis despite eating lots of dairy and taking calcium pills? It's because they eat such an acidic diet that their kidneys release calcium to neutralize the acidity..that's called bone loss. Guess how you stop it? Eat vegetables and fruits and lighten up on the acidic stuff for a balance and you quit pulling calcium out of your bones. It's called the Acid-Base balance and I'm not making that up. That's why diets like Paleo try to get people off grains...not just for the obvious problems with grains like wheat and how fattening it is, but also for the other effects that no one ever bothers to mention when they push you to eat six servings a day of something.


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  18. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by fivesocks View Post
    We need to have one of these Paleo discussions every week or so to keep me on track. I feel inspired again. Daydream Believer, I think it's so awesome that you raise your animals as free range/natural lifestyle/diet as possible. I need to research farms in my area that do this...might not be any cheaper than the free range organic meats in grocery stores though

    I eat terribly...too many sweets not enough veggies. Last night for dinner I had girl scout cookies and entirely too many fun size candy bar candies.

    I believe in Paleo, it was just so hard to quit the sugars and so dang expensive, I was a failure. But reading this makes me want to try again.
    You go five socks! You can do it!

    My weakness is sugar too. I just can't give up a chocolate bar now and then...nor my honey in my coffee and tea.

    The market farm I run now started as an experiment and just keeps on growing. My sales last year were over 20k and we're just getting started..that's gross sales and not profit...but the market for local food is HUGE. My sales grew 50% from 2011 also and now we'll have pork in 2013. I just updated my local harvest bio and it was fun reading my 2010 entry and seeing how much we've added since then.

    I do feel a lot better raising my own meat also. I know the animals are allowed to have plenty of room to forage and engage in natural behaviors, eat no questionable "stuff" like antibiotics, and are handled humanely. It makes a lot of difference to me.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2007
    Location
    Camden, DE
    Posts
    1,948

    Default

    I cut out wheat for 6 months + and it did not help my moderate depression any. I damn sure wish it could have However, ditching the wheat was the only thing I found that got rid of that stubborn belly fat even though I've always worked out and ate fairly well.


    I was thinking the other day about grab and go meals. They are so grain centered that it is hard to grab and go. Everything is a burger with buns, a sandwich, a wrap, or crackers. Granted, you can find fresh fruits and veggies at the Wawa here and mini veggie platters.

    I was just thinking back the other day to High School Cross Country team. The night before one of our comp runs we would have a team meal that basically consisted of all you can eat spaghetti. Now when I think of that...it just makes me slightly sick. Loading up on all of those carbs. I noticed previously if I had a heavy carb dinner the night before my working out the next day would suffer. I just didn't feel as good. I do think there is validity behind ditching the modern day wheat and it having positive effects.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    FYI: Here's some acid-base balance info.

    From Dr. Cordain who started the paleo diet movement:

    http://thepaleodiet.com/acidbase-balance/

    From a non biased source. I thought it interesting that the studies are worried about protein when they mention several times how cereal grains change acidity also.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/24/he...brod.html?_r=0


    1 members found this post helpful.

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