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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtyMax View Post
    Sounds delicious! I want the hash. Now! I really need to start getting up earlier so I can have a better breakfast. If I eat a good breakfast, the rest of the day is sooooo much easier. It just means getting up even earlier than I already do.
    It really takes hardly any time at all- I buy frozen pepper strips so I don't have to chop them, when I buy onions I dice a bunch of them at a time and freeze them in 1/2 onion portions, the salsa I had from a previous meal- so all I really had to do was dump the stuff in a pan, cook and slice an avacado. 10 minutes tops.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  2. #22
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    EVERYONE should read "Wheat Belly", and "Good Calories, Bad Calories"....total eye-opener, and probable life changers.

    We have been so misled by the FDA "Food Pyramid"....I wonder if there's been some conspiracy in that whole mess??? They're coercing us to eat unhealthfully. And teaching our kids this, too.
    "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Proud member of the Wheat Loss Clique.


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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtyMax View Post
    For those that do Paleo/Primal, what does your day look like?
    I'm not doing it now because I am in a weird place of having to work hard to maintain my weight, so eating a ton of cheap carby calories, but when I was doing this, typical day was:

    breakfast: 2-3 slices of bacon (I neverbothered being real religious about nitrate freeor anything), 2 scrambled eggs with cheese and salsa (organic, because it was the only kind I could find without added sweeteners, or homemade) Coffee with heavy cream.

    go to work. Eat some greek yogurt with the highest fat content I could find with a drizzle of honey or maple syrup (my tastes changed a lot doing this, so the amount I needed was minimal)

    have a banana or something (I wasn't trying to lose weight so I ate more fruit than standard "paleo".

    lunch: gigantic salad - usually a big huge tub of spring mix or baby spinach, with a full bell pepper, a half pint of grape tomatoes, a handful of carrot, half an onion, chicken or steak, avocado, pecans, feta or goat cheese, radishes, etc, with dressing that had no added sugar (also REALLY hard to find unless you make your own). It might take me an hour or more to get that salad down, that's how big it was.

    later, if I got hungry (unusual because the volume and nature of food at that point was pretty huge) I'd snack on macadamia nuts or something.

    Dinner - usually not very hungry at night. So dinner would be some sort of soup or maybe fish (usually salmon) with broccoli or something like that.

    I wasn't religious about it - I embraced the dairy and the coffee. I also would have yummy carbs once or twice a week - a few homemade cookies or really high quality bread. One thing that was neat was that my tastes changed so much that I developed a complete intolerance for cheap-carbs, like vending machine snacks or mass produced cookies. It all started to taste like chemicals (and boy, I had no idea nuts had actual flavor till I did this!). So when I did go "off" I did it with very high quality homemade things. It didn't feel like deprivation at all, but more like indulgence. The hardest things was finding stuff like salad dressing that didn't have sugar or hfcs. I made my own a lot.
    "smile a lot can let us ride happy,it is good thing"

    My CANTER blog.



  4. #24
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    I have found DELICIOUS recipes on www.paleomg.com and they are easy to make.

    What I dont' understand is that beans aren't allowed because cavement ate meat, but since when did they cook with coconut oil? And since when did they cook with canned pumpkin?

    I like the recipes I have tried, but it makes more sense to me to just stick with as unprocessed as possible and limit the carbs.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by caffeinated View Post
    I'm not doing it now because I am in a weird place of having to work hard to maintain my weight, so eating a ton of cheap carby calories, but when I was doing this, typical day was:

    breakfast: 2-3 slices of bacon (I neverbothered being real religious about nitrate freeor anything), 2 scrambled eggs with cheese and salsa (organic, because it was the only kind I could find without added sweeteners, or homemade) Coffee with heavy cream.

    go to work. Eat some greek yogurt with the highest fat content I could find with a drizzle of honey or maple syrup (my tastes changed a lot doing this, so the amount I needed was minimal)

    have a banana or something (I wasn't trying to lose weight so I ate more fruit than standard "paleo".

    lunch: gigantic salad - usually a big huge tub of spring mix or baby spinach, with a full bell pepper, a half pint of grape tomatoes, a handful of carrot, half an onion, chicken or steak, avocado, pecans, feta or goat cheese, radishes, etc, with dressing that had no added sugar (also REALLY hard to find unless you make your own). It might take me an hour or more to get that salad down, that's how big it was.

    later, if I got hungry (unusual because the volume and nature of food at that point was pretty huge) I'd snack on macadamia nuts or something.

    Dinner - usually not very hungry at night. So dinner would be some sort of soup or maybe fish (usually salmon) with broccoli or something like that.

    I wasn't religious about it - I embraced the dairy and the coffee. I also would have yummy carbs once or twice a week - a few homemade cookies or really high quality bread. One thing that was neat was that my tastes changed so much that I developed a complete intolerance for cheap-carbs, like vending machine snacks or mass produced cookies. It all started to taste like chemicals (and boy, I had no idea nuts had actual flavor till I did this!). So when I did go "off" I did it with very high quality homemade things. It didn't feel like deprivation at all, but more like indulgence. The hardest things was finding stuff like salad dressing that didn't have sugar or hfcs. I made my own a lot.
    golly..I think my elephant fainted when he heard how big your salad is...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.


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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melelio View Post
    EVERYONE should read "Wheat Belly", and "Good Calories, Bad Calories"....total eye-opener, and probable life changers.

    We have been so misled by the FDA "Food Pyramid"....I wonder if there's been some conspiracy in that whole mess??? They're coercing us to eat unhealthfully. And teaching our kids this, too.
    Safe the tinfoil for cooking,as it was intended.

    The food pyramid has been developed out of age long dietary practices that based on what was available and nutritious enough to keep you going.

    It's only been a few decades since we are not in need of super powered food anymore to make it through a day of hard physical labor.

    many of the issues were not understood, some are not fully clear yet.
    but on paper the pyramid is still a good attempt to balance the nutrition to what was available in food and knowledge.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    The food pyramid has been developed out of age long dietary practices that based on what was available and nutritious enough to keep you going.

    It's only been a few decades since we are not in need of super powered food anymore to make it through a day of hard physical labor.

    many of the issues were not understood, some are not fully clear yet.
    but on paper the pyramid is still a good attempt to balance the nutrition to what was available in food and knowledge.
    the food pyramid was abolished by its creators some years ago as utter nonsense and guaranteed to create fat, unhealthy people- which it did. They replaced it with "my plate" which is sort of a step towards a better diet, but is heavily criticized. Many people feel the dairy industry and other industries influenced it more than actual nutritional science.

    But essentially the human body has adapted over millions of years to live on a diet from which about half of calories come from vegetables and the other half come from lean game animals or fish, with very few calories coming from high-carb items like fruits, potatoes, grains, legumes. Dairy is a relatively recent invention, and most of the human population can't digest it at all.

    It's only VERY recently in the history of the human body that grains became widely available, and the unhealthy impact of a grain-based diet has been obvious in both recent times and in the archeological record. Grains are eaten as a source of calories in times when immediately starving to death due to lack of calories is much more important than worrying about long-term health. We don't have that concern today, so there is no reason to eat grains. Unless you're really broke and are actually concerned about starving to death tomorrow.

    I eat paleo and find it to be very easy to follow, not restrictive at all, and it makes you feel so much better than eating a regular carb-laden type diet. In fact, I find a good paleo diet is far less restrictive than a regular carb-laden diet- instead of filling up on boring, bland pasta or rice you eat a wide variety of tasty foods instead.

    Instead of focusing on "what not to eat", focus on WHAT TO EAT: eat lots of vegetables. Eat lots of fish. Eat lots of lean meats. Eat nuts. Play around with produce you've never even heard of before, and check out paleo recipes. You'll find you don't miss the other stuff at all.
    And don't worry about the weird details- I don't use coconut oil myself, I just use olive oil. Tried and true to be healthy, not so sure about the coconut oil. If I want to eat a few beans, or have a sandwich, I do. I just try to make sure the majority of my diet is vegetables and meat instead of other stuff.


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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    golly..I think my elephant fainted when he heard how big your salad is...
    My co-workers started referring to it as my "trough"

    "oh look at that, haha, you have a whole trough of rabbit food, haha!!" (usually while holding a tray of horrible cafeteria pasta, plus multiple slices of garlic bread, and a giant soda, balanced precariously atop a noticeable spare tire...)
    "smile a lot can let us ride happy,it is good thing"

    My CANTER blog.


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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    the food pyramid was abolished by its creators some years ago as utter nonsense and guaranteed to create fat, unhealthy people- which it did. They replaced it with "my plate" which is sort of a step towards a better diet, but is heavily criticized.

    But essentially the human body has adapted over millions of years to live on a diet from which about half of calories come from vegetables and the other half come from lean game animals or fish, with very few calories coming from high-carb items like fruits, potatoes, grains, legumes. Dairy is a relatively recent invention, and most of the human population can't digest it at all.

    It's only VERY recently in the history of the human body that grains became widely available, and the unhealthy impact of a grain-based diet has been obvious in both recent times and in the archeological record.

    I eat paleo and find it to be very easy to follow, not restrictive at all, and it makes you feel so much better than eating a regular carb-laden type diet. In fact, I find a good paleo diet is far less restrictive than a regular carb-laden diet- instead of filling up on boring, bland pasta or rice you eat a wide variety of tasty foods instead.

    Instead of focusing on "what not to eat", focus on WHAT TO EAT: eat lots of vegetables. Eat lots of fish. Eat lots of lean meats. Eat nuts. Play around with produce you've never even heard of before, and check out paleo recipes. You'll find you don't miss the other stuff at all.
    In less then 2 generations we have changed our collective lifestyle, THAT was creating the fat people. All while eating like we still worked in the coal mines.

    THAT is why the recommendations have changed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.


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  10. #30
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    http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/tech/...olerance_N.htm

    I suppose 60% is technically "most".. but that still leaves nearly half that do well on it.



  11. #31
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    In less then 2 generations we have changed our collective lifestyle, THAT was creating the fat people. All while eating like we still worked in the coal mines.

    THAT is why the recommendations have changed!
    no, they changed the recommendations because science kept pointing out they were WRONG. Even if you work in the coal mines, eating all that low nutritional value grain and simple sugars will negatively impact your health.
    The original grain-based diet suggested by the first pyramid was based on very shaky science, if any at all.
    Our hunter-gatherer ancestors worked much harder than our grain-fed more recent ancestors, and they didn't feast on grain. They were also much healthier- most of the chronic diseases that afflict our population today, yes, even the thin ones who do physical labor- don't affect people who eat a more appropriate diet.
    You should read more of the literature on paleo diet and hunter-gatherer diets. Other lower-carb diets like South Beach are based on the same principles and provide much of the same health benefit.


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  12. #32
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    Do whatever works for you, but this makes a whole lot of sense to me: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...n_1898529.html


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  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    Our hunter-gatherer ancestors worked much harder than our grain-fed more recent ancestors, and they didn't feast on grain. They were also much healthier- most of the chronic diseases that afflict our population today, yes, even the thin ones who do physical labor- don't affect people who eat a more appropriate diet.
    One of the big flaws of the whole paleo thing (and I LIKE eating that way, or mostly that way) is the whole thing about people tens of thousands of years ago being healthier. I don't think there's really a way to know that. Not to mention that tens of thousands of years ago people tended to have a much shorter life expectancy. So it's hard to say if they really had less heart disease or diabetes, considering they were about 100 times more likely to be killed by bears before getting to an age where heart disease starts to show up.

    I *do* believe it's a healthier approach to food than the modern too-many-grains diet. But I think that the whole "movement" needs to be careful to avoid fantastical, woo-ish claims. Learning to grow crops and cultivate grains may have led to unhealthy (relatively) diets - however it also let to more stable civilizations and (from their perspective) a better quality of life. Less dependence on the whims of nature and hunting probably meant longer life expectancy and less chance of grievous injury while trying to kill large animals.

    I think paleo people need to be careful to not sell a "cure" - all the "reducing inflammation" and "get rid of chronic disease" stuff treads a bit too close to snake oil for my tastes. And that's coming from someone who thinks eating that way is a good idea
    "smile a lot can let us ride happy,it is good thing"

    My CANTER blog.


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  14. #34
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    is the whole thing about people tens of thousands of years ago being healthier. I don't think there's really a way to know that.
    they have skeletons, fossil poop, garbage dumps. You can get a lot of info about health from that. Malnutrition shows up in the bones. Many diseases show up in the bones. There is archeological evidence that as people changed from hunter-gatherer to grain-based farming that health status diminished.

    They also compare populations who are still eating hunter-gatherer diets today (or until recently) to populations eating modern diets- these studies are somewhat convincing.

    Even more convincing are the studies of what happens to current people when they eat different types of diets.






    Am J Hum Biol. 2012 Mar-Apr;24(2):110-5. doi: 10.1002/ajhb.22218. Epub 2012 Jan 19.

    Paleolithic diets as a model for prevention and treatment of Western disease.

    Lindeberg S.


    Source

    Department of Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Sweden. staffan.lindeberg@med.lu.se


    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES:

    To explore the possibility that a paleolithic-like diet can be used in the prevention of age-related degenerative Western disease.

    METHODS:

    Literature review of African Paleolithic foods in relation to recent evidence of healthy nutrition.

    RESULTS AND DISCUSSION:

    Available evidence lends weak support in favor and little against the notion that lean meat, fish, vegetables, tubers, and fruit can be effective in the prevention and treatment of common Western diseases. There are no obvious risks with avoiding dairy products, margarine, oils, refined sugar, and cereal grains, which provide 70% or more of the dietary intake in northern European populations. If stroke, coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer are preventable by dietary changes, an ancestral-like diet may provide an appropriate template.

    Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


    PMID: 22262579 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]







    Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009 Jul 16;8:35. doi: 10.1186/1475-2840-8-35.

    Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study.

    Jönsson T, Granfeldt Y, Ahrén B, Branell UC, Pålsson G, Hansson A, Söderström M, Lindeberg S.


    Source

    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Box 117, 221 00 Lund, Sweden. Tommy.Jonsson@med.lu.se


    Abstract

    BACKGROUND:

    Our aim was to compare the effects of a Paleolithic ('Old Stone Age') diet and a diabetes diet as generally recommended on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin.

    METHODS:

    In a randomized cross-over study, 13 patients with type 2 diabetes, 3 women and 10 men, were instructed to eat a Paleolithic diet based on lean meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs and nuts; and a Diabetes diet designed in accordance with dietary guidelines during two consecutive 3-month periods. Outcome variables included changes in weight, waist circumference, serum lipids, C-reactive protein, blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), and areas under the curve for plasma glucose and plasma insulin in the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Dietary intake was evaluated by use of 4-day weighed food records.

    RESULTS:

    Study participants had on average a diabetes duration of 9 years, a mean HbA1c of 6,6% units by Mono-S standard and were usually treated with metformin alone (3 subjects) or metformin in combination with a sulfonylurea (3 subjects) or a thiazolidinedione (3 subjects). Mean average dose of metformin was 1031 mg per day. Compared to the diabetes diet, the Paleolithic diet resulted in lower mean values of HbA1c (-0.4% units, p = 0.01), triacylglycerol (-0.4 mmol/L, p = 0.003), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg, p = 0.03), weight (-3 kg, p = 0.01), BMI (-1 kg/m2, p = 0.04) and waist circumference (-4 cm, p = 0.02), and higher mean values of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+0.08 mmol/L, p = 0.03). The Paleolithic diet was mainly lower in cereals and dairy products, and higher in fruits, vegetables, meat and eggs, as compared with the Diabetes diet. Further, the Paleolithic diet was lower in total energy, energy density, carbohydrate, dietary glycemic load, saturated fatty acids and calcium, and higher in unsaturated fatty acids, dietary cholesterol and several vitamins. Dietary GI was slightly lower in the Paleolithic diet (GI = 50) than in the Diabetic diet (GI = 55).

    CONCLUSION:

    Over a 3-month study period, a Paleolithic diet improved glycemic control and several cardiovascular risk factors compared to a Diabetes diet in patients with type 2 diabetes.


    PMID: 19604407


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    Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes. 2012;5:175-89. doi: 10.2147/DMSO.S33473. Epub 2012 Jul 6.

    Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity.

    Spreadbury I.


    Source

    Gastrointestinal Diseases Research Unit, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.


    Abstract

    A novel hypothesis of obesity is suggested by consideration of diet-related inflammation and evolutionary medicine. The obese homeostatically guard their elevated weight. In rodent models of high-fat diet-induced obesity, leptin resistance is seen initially at vagal afferents, blunting the actions of satiety mediators, then centrally, with gastrointestinal bacterial-triggered SOCS3 signaling implicated. In humans, dietary fat and fructose elevate systemic lipopolysaccharide, while dietary glucose also strongly activates SOCS3 signaling. Crucially however, in humans, low-carbohydrate diets spontaneously decrease weight in a way that low-fat diets do not. Furthermore, nutrition transition patterns and the health of those still eating diverse ancestral diets with abundant food suggest that neither glycemic index, altered fat, nor carbohydrate intake can be intrinsic causes of obesity, and that human energy homeostasis functions well without Westernized foods containing flours, sugar, and refined fats. Due to being made up of cells, virtually all "ancestral foods" have markedly lower carbohydrate densities than flour- and sugar-containing foods, a property quite independent of glycemic index. Thus the "forgotten organ" of the gastrointestinal microbiota is a prime candidate to be influenced by evolutionarily unprecedented postprandial luminal carbohydrate concentrations. The present hypothesis suggests that in parallel with the bacterial effects of sugars on dental and periodontal health, acellular flours, sugars, and processed foods produce an inflammatory microbiota via the upper gastrointestinal tract, with fat able to effect a "double hit" by increasing systemic absorption of lipopolysaccharide. This model is consistent with a broad spectrum of reported dietary phenomena. A diet of grain-free whole foods with carbohydrate from cellular tubers, leaves, and fruits may produce a gastrointestinal microbiota consistent with our evolutionary condition, potentially explaining the exceptional macronutrient-independent metabolic health of non-Westernized populations, and the apparent efficacy of the modern "Paleolithic" diet on satiety and metabolism.


    PMID: 22826636


    there are tons more of studies showing improvements in all kinds of health factors- everything from acne and allergies to cardiovascular disease- when people switch to a paleolithic type diet. The exact details of the diets don't seem to matter, what seems to be important is eating lots of vegetables and low amounts of carbohydrates, particularly avoiding grains.



  15. #35
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    Wendy those are but little grains of sand on a whole coastline of possible evidence. Nor does it jive with long-lived populations that do have diary, grains and legumes in their diet.

    Really want to eat like a caveman? Track and hunt that really lean game animal. You'll probably burn as many calories doing that as eating it.


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  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by grayarabpony View Post

    Really want to eat like a caveman? Track and hunt that really lean game animal. You'll probably burn as many calories doing that as eating it.
    This is what I always say to people who get nutty about total Paleo eating. Those people worked really hard for their food and I bet they tried eating whatever looked edible.

    I am a CrossFitter which means I'm surrounded by Paleo evangelists. I approach my exercise and my food with common sense. Adopting some Paleo diet tips can lead to a healthier diet - subbing in zucchini noodles for pasta or cauliflower rice for rice. Amps your veggie intake, which all parties agree is good, and cuts calories. But some of the rules are weird - so clarified butter is okay but good old-fashioned Kerrygold butter is bad? You can't add milk or cream to your coffee but you can add that clarified butter? I mean really. I think people can go overboard.


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    Quote Originally Posted by KTRider View Post
    This is what I always say to people who get nutty about total Paleo eating. Those people worked really hard for their food and I bet they tried eating whatever looked edible.

    I am a CrossFitter which means I'm surrounded by Paleo evangelists. I approach my exercise and my food with common sense. Adopting some Paleo diet tips can lead to a healthier diet - subbing in zucchini noodles for pasta or cauliflower rice for rice. Amps your veggie intake, which all parties agree is good, and cuts calories. But some of the rules are weird - so clarified butter is okay but good old-fashioned Kerrygold butter is bad? You can't add milk or cream to your coffee but you can add that clarified butter? I mean really. I think people can go overboard.
    One source said 'grass fed butter'

    Can I tell you what a mess it was when I tried to feed grass to my butter?!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.


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  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    One source said 'grass fed butter'

    Can I tell you what a mess it was when I tried to feed grass to my butter?!
    Ha ha! For the record Kerrygold is grass-fed butter. And delicious. So I stop there rather than go to the next step some sources say you must do, which is clarify it. Too much work and not enough evidence of the actual benefit (for me).



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    Quote Originally Posted by KTRider View Post
    Ha ha! For the record Kerrygold is grass-fed butter. And delicious. So I stop there rather than go to the next step some sources say you must do, which is clarify it. Too much work and not enough evidence of the actual benefit (for me).
    I don't think I can buy that here... the butter IS good...and soft when straight form the fridge, too...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.



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    Quote Originally Posted by KTRider View Post
    Ha ha! For the record Kerrygold is grass-fed butter. And delicious. So I stop there rather than go to the next step some sources say you must do, which is clarify it. Too much work and not enough evidence of the actual benefit (for me).
    I didn't know there were any supposed benefits to clarifying it. I made homemade ghee as a stocking stuffer for christmas, since we use it in cooking a lot, and will say it was pretty easy (well, after I overcooked the first batch anyway). And making butter from cream is pretty satisfying for some reason.
    "smile a lot can let us ride happy,it is good thing"

    My CANTER blog.


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