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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
    Posts
    3,797

    Default Vetch in hay?

    Trying to find out more about feeding vetch, anyone have any info.

    I tried googling it but didn't get a ton of useful info on feeding it to horse.

    TIA
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,471

    Default

    It's a legume. As far as I know, it won't hurt your horses. In fact, they might like it!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
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    3,797

    Default

    The farmer growing it (mixed with orchard) says its highly palatable and has better digestible nutrition the alfalfa.
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 16, 2008
    Posts
    457

    Default

    I think Crown Vetch is considered poisonous to horses. It makes them slobber... Is plain vetch something different?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,471

    Default

    Yes, there is a difference between crown vetch, which is used as a soil stabilizer along highways, and common vetch, which you might find in hay.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2004
    Location
    Left coast, left wing, left field
    Posts
    6,527

    Default

    Just came on to search for vetch, JackSprats Mom must have seen the same CL ad! It sounds interesting. My friend got hay with Lotus Major, aka Big Trefoil -- another legume-y local variant. I was wondering if this was the same thing but it doesn't seem to be.

    Found this on wiki about vetch:

    When intended as fodder, the seed is sown densely, up to 250 kilograms per hectare. However, when grown for seed, less seed should be used; otherwise the crop will be too thick, reducing flower and seed production. When meant for seed, sowing is done early in the planting season for good returns; but, when for green food, any time in spring is suitable. Sometimes, a full crop can be obtained even when sown as late as summer, though sowing so late is not recommended.
    After the seed is sown and the land carefully harrowed, a light roller ought to be drawn across, to smooth the surface and permit the scythe to work without interruption. Also, the field should be watched for several days to prevent pigeons, which are remarkably fond of tares, from devouring much of the sown seed.
    Horses thrive very well on Common Vetch, even better than on clover and rye grass; the same applies to fattening cattle, which feed faster on vetch than on most grasses or other edible plants. Danger often arises from livestock eating too much vetch, especially when podded; colics and other stomach disorders are apt to be produced by the excessive loads devoured.
    Cereal grains can be sown with vetch so it can use their stronger stems for support, attaching via tendrils.[1] When grown with oats or other grasses, the vetch can grow upright; otherwise its weak stems may sprawl along the ground.[2] Several cultivars are available for agricultural use,[3] and as for some other legume crops, rhizobia can be added to the seed.[2]
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Location
    Alberta's bread basket
    Posts
    1,661

    Default

    I would still be cautious. I would only trust it if I really trusted the hay farmer to know what he was doing.

    I have vetch growing in one pasture which keeps trying to pull down my fence and my horses won't go anywhere near it. I suspect it is crownvetch and the stuff is extremely difficult to mow and get rid of.

    Reading on it, crownvetch can grow up to about 2 feet and the pinkish-purple flowers are in ball clusters, kinda remind me like a clover type flower. Each leaflet has up to 25 small, oval-shaped leaflets.
    http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=h...9QEwAQ&dur=255

    Hairy or common vetch has leaves up to 20 narrow leaflets, each leaf up to an inch long and the vines grow upwards 3 or more feet. It's flowers are also pinkish-purple, but they remind me more of a sweet pea type flower.
    http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=h...ed=0CDQQ9QEwAg
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    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    500

    Default

    you'd think they'd just name the two things differently so people wouldn't have to get all confused about it.

    we have some vetch growing in our pastures, thankfuly not the poisonous kind. Our horses eat it just like they eat the grass and I've never noticed any problems.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
    Posts
    53

    Default

    I realize this is an older thread but, did either JackSprats Mom or JoZ buy the hay? I think it's the same Craigslist ad I've been looking at. I am seriously considering they hay. If either of you got any, was it good hay?



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