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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2008
    Location
    Berks County, PA
    Posts
    193

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    We just recently made the switch to round bales/large squares due to necessity...we have 38-40 horses/ponies on the farm and in southeastern PA the small bales are becoming a thing of the past and the price keeps going up. We use sections of large diameter industrial drainage pipe (54") cut into 36" sections (approximately)(some are smaller in pony fields). We feed ALL of our hay under roof. This shows how we do it better than I can explain it. The first bale has netting around it...it is a nautical type netting that we bought on a roll and "sewed" our own cover using baler twine. There is virtually NO WASTE with this! The second one is being installed with a Bale Buddy around it. Bale Buddy's will not work for ponies; they can't reach the top. Some horses do well with the Bale Buddys...others we just use the plastic pipe rings with no netting. The Haflinger flings hay out of the Bale Buddy; it doesn't work for her. The TurboFriesians are totally neat with their Bale Buddy, even without the added plastic pipe container...they eat it down to the dregs with no waste.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZ2XkVxb7QM



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Posts
    3,378

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    Cheap and easy - we set round bales up against a corner so only two sides are open. Gramps then uses heavy rope to tie pallets up against the open sides and tightens them to the wall, He can wrap around the framing studs. Then as the bale reduces you can tighten the ropes and draw the pallets in closer. When they eat it down then we pull the pallets off the front and let them clean the rest up. Keeps our bales tidy, no waste. Cannot help you with horse toilet problems.

    and we set the bales up off the ground on pallets.
    Last edited by pony grandma; Feb. 7, 2013 at 11:56 AM. Reason: add
    About the only time losing is more fun than winning is when you're fighting temptation.
    -- Tom Wilson, actor & comedian



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2008
    Location
    Berks County, PA
    Posts
    193

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    and THIS is how we are feeding our large squares now....
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=U9FIq92MozU this video is NOT our farm...we bought two of these feeders and "straddled" the fence of two pastures, thus servicing four fields with only two feeders (two to hour horses in each field) We set them on the diagonal between the two fencelines. Will try to take pics/video of them today as we are refilling them this afternoon. Have only had these feeders a few weeks and LOVE LOVE LOVE them. Again, NO WASTE, DRY HAY that is up off the ground. They easily hold two large squares (approx. 750# per bale) Horses are completely happy and hay consumption can be somewhat restricted if desired using the collapsing sides ...just fix them into place


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,865

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Bandit View Post
    We just recently made the switch to round bales/large squares due to necessity...we have 38-40 horses/ponies on the farm and in southeastern PA the small bales are becoming a thing of the past and the price keeps going up. We use sections of large diameter industrial drainage pipe (54") cut into 36" sections (approximately)(some are smaller in pony fields). We feed ALL of our hay under roof. This shows how we do it better than I can explain it. The first bale has netting around it...it is a nautical type netting that we bought on a roll and "sewed" our own cover using baler twine. There is virtually NO WASTE with this! The second one is being installed with a Bale Buddy around it. Bale Buddy's will not work for ponies; they can't reach the top. Some horses do well with the Bale Buddys...others we just use the plastic pipe rings with no netting. The Haflinger flings hay out of the Bale Buddy; it doesn't work for her. The TurboFriesians are totally neat with their Bale Buddy, even without the added plastic pipe container...they eat it down to the dregs with no waste.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZ2XkVxb7QM
    Love the video. EEK-it's a horse eating round thing!!!!

    Neat idea for that drainage tubing
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2008
    Location
    Berks County, PA
    Posts
    193

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    I forgot to add that the horses and ponies soon learned NOT to grab the netting as they ate...the video is showing the first minutes that they were introduced to this new system, and they were not as adept. Even the big Friesian soon was eating with beautiful finesse. Works like a great big slow-feeding hay bag!



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2007
    Location
    Zone IV/Area III
    Posts
    1,215

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Bandit View Post
    I forgot to add that the horses and ponies soon learned NOT to grab the netting as they ate...the video is showing the first minutes that they were introduced to this new system, and they were not as adept. Even the big Friesian soon was eating with beautiful finesse. Works like a great big slow-feeding hay bag!
    Shouldn't be an issue if they grab the netting Mine uses a FF for his stall, and he actively uses it and grabs it to get hay out. No issues in the 2 years he's had one!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,950

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    Blue Bandit, loved your video. Giggled like crazy when the pony walked right up to it and started eating and the big horse was still freaking out about how scary it is.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2008
    Location
    Berks County, PA
    Posts
    193

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    reay: only mentioned because 6 to 8 ponies tearing at netting 24/7 CAN equal: destroyed netting lol Ponies are eating and destroying machines!



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2008
    Location
    Berks County, PA
    Posts
    193

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    trubandloki: lol, that big fellow is the most un-brave horse on the farm...hence why he can live with the ponies lol. They boss him around mercilessly! We have finally taken pity on him and moved him to a field of horses. That group has also not rolled out the Welcome Wagon mat for him, poor fellow. He is a big, giant teddy bear who just wants to be loved



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,663

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    OP, here's what I'm doing. It's quick and dirty and not very pretty, but it's working. I don't have a tractor, so I have to be able to put the feeder around the bale manually, which sounds like your situation.
    I wrap plastic snow fencing around the bale-- It takes about 25ft of fence to wrap around our bales. Weave two wooden dowels, or PVC or whatever you have on hand (that's not going to impale anyone ) vertically through each end of the fence, and use those to pull the fence snug around the bale and tie them together at the back of the bale. This keeps the material nice and square as you unroll it. One or two additional dowels spaced around the bale gives the whole thing a little more structure.

    To keep fence tight against the bale and to keep the bale from unrolling, I wrap a tie-down strap around the circumference of the bale, and cinch it up very tight. As they eat down the bale, I use those dowels to take slack out of the fence, and tighten up the tiedown strap some more.

    There is still some waste, but it at least keeps them from pulling giant slabs of hay off and trampling it. This setup works up until the point where the bale doesn't have much structure left to it anymore. At that point I pitchfork what's left into tire feeders. My guys are barefoot so I don't worry about them catching a heel in the fencing material, but the fence rips easily anyway.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion



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