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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2012
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    Montana
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    2,439

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    Well another vote in support of your good judgement! Of course his meat handling is risky, which you know!

    I don't handle much meat these days, except game. And I am still very careful about the platters, the counter, any chopping utensil, etc.

    I am not a germaphobe at all (!!),more of a paper-chase type slob, but am a nazi about my kitchen and about cooking. NO TASTING (unless with clean, new utensil not to be used again), no double dipping, no food set up where people would use their hands(husband puts cheese out for people to put on chili and would be fine with people just using their fingers... NO). I have enough gasto issues that I am not looking for any more, and certainly would not knowingly inflict them on anyone else!

    Good for you for being aware (and still being nice!!)



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2008
    Posts
    159

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    You're not over-reacting.

    Does he really want to deal with the consequences IF he IS wrong? Food poisoning isn't always just a day or two of upset stomach. Think: possible death, kidney failure, being on dialysis for three hours a day/three days a week for the rest of your life....

    Is it REALLY all that difficult to get a clean plate to put the cooked meat on and wash your hands after handling raw meat? Or maybe your dad shouldn't be doing the cooking if he can't remember or can't follow basic food safety in the kitchen, can someone else do it?



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2007
    Posts
    929

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    I refuse to eat anything my grandmother cooks. I once witnessed her take chicken legs out of the freezer, and let them thaw all day... and all night. Then she cooked them in the morning, and left them on the counter all day long. (And she kept her house at about 80 degrees in the winter) Then at 7pm at night, she popped them back in the oven to warm them up, and offered some of them to us before she took them to her bowling team. I still wonder if any of them got horribly sick from that night.

    She also bought around 100 eggs, and kept them on top of her drier for 2 weeks before she started using them for her "holiday baking." Needless to say, the plate of goodies she delivered to us went straight to the garbage. Thank goodness when we were living with them (while we looked for a house of our own in the area) I had recently gone organic, and so I kept my own eggs and milk. She also tried to get me to give my girls (who were all of two years old then) some nesquick she had. I had no idea how long she had it, and didn't give my girls such things anyway. When my Aunt came to visit and stayed with her, she told me she threw out some Nesquick which had Arabic writing on it. The thing is, she and my grandfather hadn't lived in Saudi Arabia since right before the FIRST gulf war!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,995

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    I cook all my meat until it is very very dead...as in well done. So I would not eat this just because I am not a fan of rare meat.

    Most of my family eats it barely cooked on the edges. So really, how is the juice from it being raw on the plate much different than the seared on the edges sliced and plopped on a plate juices? Very rare meat is no different than raw meat. (My brother actually eats raw beef, slices off pieces and eats them.)



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    4,955

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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    I cook all my meat until it is very very dead...as in well done. So I would not eat this just because I am not a fan of rare meat.

    Most of my family eats it barely cooked on the edges. So really, how is the juice from it being raw on the plate much different than the seared on the edges sliced and plopped on a plate juices? Very rare meat is no different than raw meat. (My brother actually eats raw beef, slices off pieces and eats them.)
    The juice was in contact with the outer edges, which are where the bacteria is. When you sear a steak, you kill that bacteria, while the inside can still be a bit raw because its not been exposed. The outer edges are sitting in juice, then cooked (so the bacteria are killed off) and then just plunked back in nasty juices.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,296

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    I worked in dietary just out of high school, at an old folks home. Bleach was our friend as was the walk-in. We didn't use as many plates and utensils as DH, who gets plenty plates dirty but will NOT put fresh cooked food on a previously used plate, even one he just served himself his first helping on. The old folks' home bleached their cutting board at the end of every night, if DH has been chopping meat or preparing game he bleaches the board or the sink and the counters, whichever.

    I dunno. We have a family member who sees no need for daily bathing. I get that, I grew up with the Sunday bath, and I get the been doing this this way forever etc, but dang I don't remember the oily hair smell and whiffs of private areas either back in the day.


    That stuff isn't juice - it's blood and serum and raw and full of bacteria. Yuck!
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,479

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    Honestly this thread is making me sick. OMG.
    but to answer the op, i would not eat anything he cooked. Ever.
    you are not overreacting one bit.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2012
    Location
    NYC=center of the universe
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    1,931

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    Very much not an overreaction. I would be sooo grossed out. And I have a super, super delicate stomach so, yes, I would probably be sick from that. Except that I just would not eat it. Not sure I would eat anything there.

    It's too easy to pick up a food-borne illness. I agree that so many people think it's the flu when it's really food poisoning. It's very, very common.
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
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    Center of the Universe
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    6,901

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    You can reduce your risks by buying high-quality free-range meat- factory farmed animals and feedlot animals are much more likely to harbor e. coli and salmonella in their guts.

    During the slaughter process, the surface of the meat frequently gets contaminated by fecal material, so in order to avoid getting sick, you need to treat raw surfaces of meat very carefully- anything the raw surface touches needs to be washed. Once the meat surface has been heated sufficiently, it's fine. But plunk that surface back down on the same plate, well, you might as well have not bothered to cook it at all.

    As to washing your own hands before eating, it depends on what you've touched lately- if you might have touched contaminated fecal material you can get very sick.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2009
    Posts
    2,827

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    Thanks guys, that's how I feel. I should note this is the first time he's done this in years. It's not like our kitchen is a bacteria filled death zone. My mom keeps everything very clean despite my dads best efforts

    The meat is shot and processed in our back yard, so it is slightly safer than meat from the grocery. If it's from a grocery (chicken, pork), my mom cooks it, so it's not a problem.
    Quote Originally Posted by pinecone View Post
    I can't decide if I should saddle up the drama llama, dust off the clue bat, or get out my soapbox.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2003
    Posts
    433

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    I would not eat anything the OP's father prepared either.

    I do however eat an apple (after wiping the pesticide and whatever else off on my not so clean riding pants) after grooming my horse.



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