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  1. #21
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    May. 11, 2004
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    Remember when we didn't in Hunters have a course walk... We schooled over the fences. We learned our courses and got pointers from our trainer and went in.
    Friend of bar .ka



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Qc
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    Quote Originally Posted by bumknees View Post
    Remember when we didn't in Hunters have a course walk... We schooled over the fences. We learned our courses and got pointers from our trainer and went in.
    You walk your hunter courses? Why for?

    There is no course walk in the hunters here in Quebec.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2012
    Location
    Somewhere down-under
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    156

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    I'm sorry but do you really need a trainer to hold your hand constantly. Until I started in the 4'+ my trainer didn't really do much but maybe help me warm up over a few jumps. Now I can be totally self sufficient at a show if he is somewhere else or didn't go to a certain show.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2005
    Location
    Where it is perpetually winter
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    5,130

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    Quote Originally Posted by alibi_18 View Post
    You walk your hunter courses? Why for?

    There is no course walk in the hunters here in Quebec.
    The only hunter courses that walk in the US are the derbies, the regular classes don't.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    67

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    Quote Originally Posted by supershorty628 View Post
    Good trainers do that. Then again, wouldn't it be nice if riders took the responsibility of learning the course and watching some rounds (if possible) to see how it's riding so the trainer doesn't have to hold their hand so much?

    The rider has responsibilities too, and at least the way I was raised, it was MY job to go learn my course and see how it rode. Learned it first thing in the morning once I was done with chores. Just saying...
    Exactly



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,338

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    Any decent trainer worth his or her salt should be able to say to multiple clients, "Sally, Fritz has a big stride so coming off this oxer you need to package him for the triple combination and make sure he's back on his haunches. Take a pull right after the oxer so you aren't in his face right before the jump. Molly, little Spotty is going to find the oxer-oxer-oxer a stretch so make sure you have a good pace coming in and move up to the base of the combination." I mean, really. How hard is that? It's Trainer 101.

    And those are the beginner courses. By the time you have a little experience it should be more like, "Sally, how are you going to ride the oxer to triple combo? What do you think Fritz needs? Molly, what about Spotty?"

    The trainer's job is to help you learn to make good decisions. Note that the goal is for YOU to make a plan, not for the trainer to make one for you. The ride the plan, not just to go from 1 to 2 to 3 to 4 and hope it all works out.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2013
    Posts
    382

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    I understand I should be responsible for learning my course and the rider should just have to go over it with the trainer. My problem is when I am required to pay a training fee to go to a show and my trainer barely says a word to me. I don't have a lot of money to show and expect some coaching if I am paying a coaching fee. I am completly comfortable showing without coaching or a trainer but some require I pay the fee to go to the show with everyone so in that case I would like to be talked through my courses on the best way to ride them and review my ride after I get out of the ring.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2009
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    1,297

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    Quote Originally Posted by SquishTheBunny View Post
    I see what the OP is saying.

    For example, in a big barn that has 5-6 students walking the 1.0m course with trainer - trainer isnt going to discuss how each horse needs to approach particular course. (ie. the big bay needs to sit back coming to this one stride, where the little chestnut should gallop forward etc.). Often times riders at the lower levels DO need their coach to provide them with pointers. I know when I first started in the jumper ring with my gelding (he was a Qh/Percheron) I had to ride it completely different than the hot TB the other girl was riding. But, because I was new to the jumper ring, I couldnt assess the course the same way a coach with years experience could. You figure it out as you go and gain experience,but sometimes having a coach say "hey...this liverpool coming out of the corner is in a funny spot, keep a lot of leg coming through the corner" is helpful

    By telling your students the course, and leaving it at that, may work in a team that has been together for a while, but for a new horse-rider combo or a green rider, it likely isnt enough.
    Your trainer doesn't do this? Then you should really expand your horizons. Every trainer I've been with absolutely discusses the different aspects of the courses with respect to the different horses and riders in the class. "Here we roll back to the Gucci fence. Suzie, you're going to need to really focus on jumping in quiet because I want you to try the inside turn with Dobbin and you'll need to do this that and the other thing. Jane, lets just think FORWARD FORWARD with Spot and do the outside turn. Katie, you've been doing this height for a while and I want you to really go for it. Slice the first fence and blah blah blah."

    You learn your course outside the ring. You learn your ride on the course walk.



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