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  1. #1

    Default Wouldn't it be nice

    Just came from a horse show and had a thought. Wouldn't it be nice if trainers could use their time at shows coaching people on the best way to ride a course instead of just helping people learn the course? It seems like a lot of times, learning and staying on course tends to trump the actual "riding" aspect.



  2. #2
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    What kind of trainer are you riding with? When my trainers (past and current) and I walk courses we talk about all aspects of the course and how to ride it in the best way.


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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Go fast and win View Post
    Just came from a horse show and had a thought. Wouldn't it be nice if trainers could use their time at shows coaching people on the best way to ride a course instead of just helping people learn the course? It seems like a lot of times, learning and staying on course tends to trump the actual "riding" aspect.
    Good trainers do that. Then again, wouldn't it be nice if riders took the responsibility of learning the course and watching some rounds (if possible) to see how it's riding so the trainer doesn't have to hold their hand so much?

    The rider has responsibilities too, and at least the way I was raised, it was MY job to go learn my course and see how it rode. Learned it first thing in the morning once I was done with chores. Just saying...


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  4. #4
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    Same as supershorty. I was supposed to learn the course ON MY OWN (though I usually enlisted the help of a friend. I would recite the course to her) without my trainer. My trainer/s would double check with me, but wouldn't teach it to me.



  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Go fast and win View Post
    Just came from a horse show and had a thought. Wouldn't it be nice if trainers could use their time at shows coaching people on the best way to ride a course instead of just helping people learn the course? It seems like a lot of times, learning and staying on course tends to trump the actual "riding" aspect.
    As others said, riders should learn their courses first.



  6. #6
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    I always make sure my kids learn the course on their own just as supershorty said, then have them recite it back to me. I give them a few reminders and ask them questions like "what track are you going to use to get to that first fence?" or "how do you think you should make that rollback?". However, I don't go into every little detail because those are the things that we practice at home. Hopefully my kids already KNOW how to execute the course because that is exactly what we work on during lessons. So they should already know the difference in how each element rides and what the course designer was testing when they set a line up a certain way. I may give them little reminders of things they already know from lessons but I am not going to spend 25 minutes telling them exactly when and where to half halt or add leg or sit deeper, etc.


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  7. #7
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    Default

    Our daughter was always told that it was her responsibility to learn the course…………



  8. #8
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    We are expected to know the course when we walk up to the ring with our trainer. Any good trainer will tell you how to ride it the most effectively. Usually, I prefer watching a horse or two, and we watch and discuss that we liked and what to change.



  9. #9
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    Yes, I never leave learning the course up to my trainer either, and watch as many rounds as I can (I am one of those riders who gets to the show as early as possible and stays till as late as possible to watch as much as possible of all classes as well). But when actually on the course walk, my trainers have always talked about all aspects of the course, the best way to ride it, as well as asking me questions about how to ride some parts so I can use my own brain to figure things out and they can correct me if I am incorrect. THe more experienced you get, the less your trainer will need to go into details, so it may not SEEM as though trainers are giving too much instruction.



  10. #10
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    wouldn't it be nice if trainers and their clients/students actually learned the course, watched some trips in a timely manner so they don't hold up the rings w/all the last minute stuff


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  11. #11
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    Jun. 18, 2007
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    I tell my trainer what the course is as we walk into the ring--then they look at what we are working with and we talk strategy from there.
    Lesmiz_07



  12. #12
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    Although, on a funny side, we had a working student/long stirrup rider who COULD NOT remember a course! Like seriously, we worked with her four hours helping her remember courses and she would always freeze in the ring! Eventually we put her on my mare--total packer. She got half way around the course and then pointed my mare at a wrong fence (backwards)--my mare refused and the rider was able to find the correct jump. Right toward the end she pointed my mare at another wrong fence (again the fence was backwards) and again my mare refused (only fences she refused, and very politely I might add). She was able to correct the pattern again.

    So of course she didn't place, but was wasn't disqualified for the first time EVER! The fences were only like 2'-2'3" and my horse could have easily jumped them, but she was like "there are no flowers this way, silly, try again!"

    For the record, the rider is doing amazing now!! But she had a rough start
    Lesmiz_07


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  13. #13
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    Default

    I see what the OP is saying.

    For example, in a big barn that has 5-6 students walking the 1.0m course with trainer - trainer isnt going to discuss how each horse needs to approach particular course. (ie. the big bay needs to sit back coming to this one stride, where the little chestnut should gallop forward etc.). Often times riders at the lower levels DO need their coach to provide them with pointers. I know when I first started in the jumper ring with my gelding (he was a Qh/Percheron) I had to ride it completely different than the hot TB the other girl was riding. But, because I was new to the jumper ring, I couldnt assess the course the same way a coach with years experience could. You figure it out as you go and gain experience,but sometimes having a coach say "hey...this liverpool coming out of the corner is in a funny spot, keep a lot of leg coming through the corner" is helpful

    By telling your students the course, and leaving it at that, may work in a team that has been together for a while, but for a new horse-rider combo or a green rider, it likely isnt enough.



  14. #14
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SquishTheBunny View Post
    I see what the OP is saying.

    For example, in a big barn that has 5-6 students walking the 1.0m course with trainer - trainer isnt going to discuss how each horse needs to approach particular course. (ie. the big bay needs to sit back coming to this one stride, where the little chestnut should gallop forward etc.). Often times riders at the lower levels DO need their coach to provide them with pointers. I know when I first started in the jumper ring with my gelding (he was a Qh/Percheron) I had to ride it completely different than the hot TB the other girl was riding. But, because I was new to the jumper ring, I couldnt assess the course the same way a coach with years experience could. You figure it out as you go and gain experience,but sometimes having a coach say "hey...this liverpool coming out of the corner is in a funny spot, keep a lot of leg coming through the corner" is helpful

    By telling your students the course, and leaving it at that, may work in a team that has been together for a while, but for a new horse-rider combo or a green rider, it likely isnt enough.
    I have seen plenty of trainers (mine being one of them) who walk courses in groups and still give individual instruction where needed for each specific horse and rider.


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  15. #15
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    I think there's a difference between memorizing your course and being taught the best way to ride it.


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  16. #16
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    I've always been in a big show group and never once had a trainer not address me specifically. It's always been my job to go down and learn my courses first thing in the morning, except for my handy which my trainer insists that he teaches so that I remember and know which turns to take. In fact my normal routine is that when the groom or my dad brings my horse down for his morning lunge (5 minutes just to let him get the bucks out and stretch) I walk with them down then stop at the ring and learn them.
    .אני יכול לעשות הכל על ידי אלוהים



  17. #17
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    Thumbs up OF COURSE!

    i AGREE, GOOD TRAINERS DO THAT
    Quote Originally Posted by supershorty628 View Post
    Good trainers do that. Then again, wouldn't it be nice if riders took the responsibility of learning the course and watching some rounds (if possible) to see how it's riding so the trainer doesn't have to hold their hand so much?

    The rider has responsibilities too, and at least the way I was raised, it was MY job to go learn my course and see how it rode. Learned it first thing in the morning once I was done with chores. Just saying...
    breeder of Mercury!

    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans



  18. #18
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    Default

    I'm assuming you were watching lower level adults or children? Especially for lower level jumpers (older rerider adults who arent as confident or younger kids) just remembering a longer course is the goal. And the jumps are enough that minor track/pace mistakes aren't as killer. Hopefully when you get to the point you are really focused on track and differing pace/rhythm to individual jumps you can memorize a course.



  19. #19
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    I'm with Supershorty and Elislove, my trainer will walk the course with a group of riders, but we are expected to have already learned the course ourselves! She will give people their own pointers and ideas if needed and sometimes will even ask questions (to make sure we understand what the course is asking of us). We are also capable of walking the course by ourselves if she is busy at another ring and she will talk to us about it when she is able to get over to us. If we don't bother to learn the course ourselves before trainer comes to walk with us.......well I have heard lectures about being responsible for our selves and dished out!
    Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!



  20. #20
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    Default

    I've never had the opportunity to have someone walk a course with me, I've always been the one to do it on my own. I now do it for my students - they are required to learn their own course, and I'll help them with the specifics/reminders, but once they're in the ring - it's up to them and the horse to do it right.



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