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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Dutchess County, New York
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    4,210

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    Big Fluffy Dog Rescue has dogs that fit your requirements. They are on facebook and have a website.

    But I'm with you -- we have an opening for a med/large adult dog and have not managed to find one. I'm not keen on adopting from one photo on the internet either. If anyone wants to give me advice I'd be happy to hear it!



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2004
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    1,115

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    I would think it would depend upon what kind of cat they were exposed or tested with. A confident cat that does not run or a fraidy cat that runs can make a big difference. I've had dogs here that were interested in cats but when mine did not react they became uninterested. I don't know if in a new place with a reactive cat that they would revert.


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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,715

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    I think a lot of dogs end up in rescues and shelters for a reason, not GOOD reasons, but things like "we never bothered to train or do a thing with him and now he's a PITA" .. but the end dog result is the same. A dog that is under the radar and being not-disruptive doesn't warrant the extra energy of donating him/her to a rescue or shelter. I think a lot of people that take their PITA dogs in to a shelter or rescue play the "moving" or "allergy" card to make it all go easier on themselves. I feel bad for most dogs on the planet but when I look at the ones that are out there to maybe join my family... um... not many. I have six cats, kids, chickens, horses... I fall back on pups that can grow up under the chase critters.

    OP if you want a very small and down on his luck catahoula puppy I know of one that was just barely missed by the traffic on a highway in TX that really needs a home. A friend of mine picked him up after watching a car straddle him on the interstate-he's about 5 weeks old. Baby dog.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    20,116

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    I have four adopted dogs. My last was a new/old cocker. She was 14 when I brought her home....she a gem! They're all wonderful. BS that only the ones no one wants end up in rescue. Total BS.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    13,289

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    Many dogs will chase cats that aren't "family". I had 2 cockers, and they loved our cats. But if a strange cat came in the yard, they'd chase them. So try to find a foster that has cats, where the dog does ok, and then realize that when you first get them home, you have to help them learn that the cat is "family". You can do that by holding the cat and letting the dog sniff his hind end (just to avoid being swatted with front claws...not because they are doing like dogs do with each other). Then give cat a toddler gate in a doorway into another room that is raised off the ground about 8" to allow cat to go under to get away from him at first. Keep dog on a leash when cat is in same room and give him treats when he ignores the cat. It can take a few days but generally will work, if the dog has previously lived with cats.

    I wouldn't recommend a Greyhound for someone with cats, since most still retain the desire to chase small furry moving objects.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26

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    Pugs. Can't be bothered to chase much of anything, like to sleep (maybe TOO much for you though?) and are generally happy dogs. There are often older pugs available for adoption on Petfinder.

    Downside - as they age, they do tend to have some health and/or eye problems, and they shed a LOT. Like, you'll vacuum up a pug a day shedding...well, I have 3, so the shedding is a little more ridiculous than if you just have one.
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2002
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,983

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    Aww. We adopted our Shepherd/Lab cross two years ago, and while she REALLY wanted to run and bark and gnaw on the cats, she quickly learned that Inigo kitty owned the place and was not afraid of her. The two of them had an understanding and could be around each other no problem. (Lost him last September. )

    Then there's Mija. Mija would eat the dog if she could. She growls, hisses, and chases the dog when she can, which means the dog whines and paces and worries when the cat is nearby. A few times, the two have them have thrown it down and gotten in a loud battle, drawing blood from both (superficial every time). It helps that the dog is a coward, but her size makes her capable of doing a lot of damage when afraid and striking out in defense (it seems every time, Mija starts it) at the 14lb fat cat.

    Shelties are nice, too--we had one that adopted all cats as her babies. Not an aggressive bone in her body.

    We stumbled across our dog at a PetSmart weekend adoption--maybe check those out, too? You never know what might happen to be there.
    SA Ferrana Moniet
    Not goodbye--just waiting at the end of the trail.
    My bloggity blog: Hobby Horse: Adventures of the Perpetual Newbie



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2006
    Location
    An American Living In Ireland
    Posts
    5,658

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    A few years ago we got a GSD dog that was a former coal yard guard dog. He became to docile and so they just let him loose in the streets of Dublin. I called a GSD rescue after our other one died. They told me about this dog. Asked about cats and they didn't know. At the time he was a stray and being fed scraps by a family. I asked about cats and they didn't know. While hesitant we went to pick him up. I said he'd have to come back if the cat thing didn't work out. At the time we had Bonnie. She was our dog "hating" cat that trained the dogs well. She let them know who was boss and then we had no issues. Stan was a year old at the time but lots of unknowns. He was home about 15 mins when he walked into the kitchen and Bonnie promptly attached herself to his head. Stan just dropped to the ground and put his paws over his head. So he got to stay and is still here. To confuse matters, my other cat is a dog lover. None of mine will chase the cats in or out and Stan will herd Clyde away from what he thinks is danger.

    Best of luck in your search. It's never easy to find the right one. I was really lucky with Stan. I do love GSD dogs. They seem to have good heads on their shoulders.

    Terri
    COTH, keeping popcorn growers in business for years.

    "I need your grace to remind me to find my own." Snow Patrol-Chasing Cars. This line reminds me why I have horses.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2008
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    794

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    I think that depends on teh rescue. I adopted through DRU in NH this past November. Color did not matter. Sex did not matter. What did matter was that the dog HAD to be good with small children, and like cats. First I filled out five pages of questions, then a one hour phone call interview. Then they spoke with my landlord, next my dog vet, then my horse vet right after he had made a visit here. AFter talking to him they decided to skip the home visit from the outreach worker and we were invited over to meet a blue male they had. We were required to bring our other dog with us.

    They were absolutely right. He will sit right there and let my two and six yr old grandaughters apply makeup to his face all while loving EVERY minute or it. All three of my cats sleep with him and I every night. This rescue is VERY careful with placing their dogs and has a very low return rate.

    ETA: Figured I should add that this was little kids fake type makeup and that they are not allowed to do this without supervision, before someone gets all worked up.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
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    4,210

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    What's DRU?


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  11. #31
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,695

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    Quote Originally Posted by SMF11 View Post
    Big Fluffy Dog Rescue has dogs that fit your requirements. They are on facebook and have a website.

    But I'm with you -- we have an opening for a med/large adult dog and have not managed to find one. I'm not keen on adopting from one photo on the internet either. If anyone wants to give me advice I'd be happy to hear it!
    BFD is where the cat-chaser came from. Broke our hearts. We were in love with that dog from the minute we met him at his foster home. He is back on Petfinder and he is STILL described as "good with cats."
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2007
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    782

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    I had the same problem when I got my now 3yo dog. My beloved heart dog had just passed away, and my cats all loved her - they had all come in as kittens with her around and just don't have the "dog fear" that would be common in most cats. My solution was to get a puppy - a smart pup that I could train from the very beginning that cats are friends. I really didn't want a puppy, my heart dog came to me at almost 2 years old, so I was able to avoid the puppy junk. But, I just couldn't take any chances with my cats. As it turns out, I got a really great puppy as she was very easily trainable and smart, and got the cat thing right away.
    “Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of Solitaire. It is a grand passion.” ~Emerson



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2012
    Posts
    282

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    Is it really trying to chase or eat the cat? My border collie is super inquisitive and like to sniff butt (yes, I admit it, my dog likes to sniff butt.) So she will go up to my moms cats, rudely stick her nose up their butt, and when they get up and start trotting up, she trots after them trying to sniff. At first we thought she chased, then I let it play out one day, as soon as the cat stopped, she stopped and sniffed, then walked away. Of course the "leave it" command is amazing for moments like that. But, is it actually a chase or a different scenario?



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    20,116

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    Here's a mix from the hoarding situation in Ohio. She's a collie/GP mix, about 8 years old. They can help transport.

    http://www.tristatecollierescue.org/snowflake.html
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2008
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    794

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    DRU is Doberman Rescue Unlimited. They are in SAndown, NH. Very well run place. They feed the dogs there raw and or Innova. My dog came with a micro-ship, all sorts of temperament testing. TEsted for HW ,three tick borne diseases, thyroid levels, all other shots. His chip was registered with HOme Again. They even registered him with the town of SAndown. Came with all sorts of paperwork about where he'd come from etc. There was a donation of $300 but they put more than that into him at the vets. They gave him a brand new fake sheepskin type coat and one for our beagle too. I really can't say well enough about these ppl. I am still in touch with them and send pics of the boy in his new country life.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2008
    Location
    Wimberley, TX
    Posts
    169

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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    Regarding cat chasing. It's not so cut and dried. Many dogs will first chase your cat, but you can train them to leave your cat alone. There are exceptions of course -high high prey drive dogs. You can usually tell intent the first time they go after your cat.

    Paula
    More appropriately, the CAT will teach the dog to leave it alone. My dear old barn cat quickly taught my two Dane puppies when "no" means "NO"!

    Yes, there are some dogs that will hurt cats, but the majority of dogs won't challenge a cat once it's claws are out.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,202

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    You do realize that there is an " adjustment period" when you bring the dog home and that he/ she needs to get to know the cat and recognize it as part of it's family? My dogs will sometimes chase the barn cat ( then I see barn cat rubbing up against these same dogs 2 seconds later) and sometimes they chase the inside cat too. My dogs will kill an intruder cat if given the chance. We have had adult strays live with us and never bother our cats. It can just take time. I have never had a bad dog and we have had many kinds of dog breed combinations.


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  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jun. 26, 2001
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,363

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    I have a female Gordon that was raised along side our cat, this cat raised 4 pups in her time and was great friends with all . . .until . . . the bitch from hell! She came to us at 3 months old and would never give up the great cat chase! She was nailed I can't say how many times by my kitty. Blood, more blood, sliced up nose, again blood. That poor kitty would look at me like WTF is wrong with this one eh?

    She never would leave the cat alone! She would get rough with her and whack the cat would nail her. She would just come back for more. I tried every training trick in the book and some not in the book! Nothing would deter this bitch from going after the cat.

    The other dogs would hang with the cat and she would barge into the middle of the pile and go after the cat time and time again. Nothing stopped her. I have not replaced my kitty due to this as the hell bitch is still alive and kicking and only 5 years old. I would love to get another kitty but this one just doesn't get it. LEAVE THE KITTY ALONE! Not gonna happen.

    She is just wired differently than any other dog I have every bred, raised etc. She has this little voice in her head that goes "get the kitty, get the kitty get the kitty!" lol!

    I finally had to use doggie gates to keep the kitty safe from her. She would not back off after getting her face sliced open!
    Lions and Tigers and Bears, oh my!!



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 1999
    Location
    Clayton, CA USA
    Posts
    5,035

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    I got a very large dog from our local county shelter. He was a little younger than you want, but has a super temperament and has always been wonderful with our cats. He was apparently born that way. I rescued another large dog from the same shelter, older, probably sevenish, and he is also good with cats. I lucked out with them, but they are out there. I do tons of rescue, (cats) but every I try and deal with small private rescues and pefinder, I give up. But kill shelters can be great, because if you find what you want you have saved a life and that is often the place where really big dogs end up. Small dogs are more popular.
    Mystic Owl Sporthorses
    www.mysticowlsporthorses.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 1999
    Location
    Clayton, CA USA
    Posts
    5,035

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    I need to add, a dog that is good with cats doesn't need to be told that cats are special. I have a revolving door of cats because I foster, and my dogs need to know, from the get go, that cats are to be respected. There has no doubt been an element of luck involved, but the big dogs I have brought home have been good from the first minute through the door. I always have labs and crosses, and golden retrievers. I have also had two pitbulls who were good, and my recent older dog adoption has some great Pyrenees I think. One of the labs is probably crossed with great dane, and another I had was probably a golden retriever/rottie.
    Mystic Owl Sporthorses
    www.mysticowlsporthorses.com



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