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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Chapel Hill, NC
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    1,782

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    MSG's glutamic acid can come as a breakdown product of many complex proteins, including wheat, but does not need to. I'm sure to be safe it's recommended against by some Celiac experts, but since it's a hydrolyzed (broken down) component of a protein, not the protein itself, it's not considered "gluten". Glutamate is also found naturally in tomatoes, too.

    That said, there are people who are sensitive to it aside from that and one theory is that some have a mild allergy to it.

    I was never formally diagnosed as Celiac--Celiac wasn't as "common" (probably was, but just not recognized) back when I had my spate of testing, so no biopsies for it back then. My doc says to test for antibodies I'd have to go back on a high-gluten diet for at least 2 weeks before testing. NO THANKS!!! I'd considered the genetic test for me and my daughter, but it isn't covered by our insurance and is mucho dinero!

    In the end, it doesn't matter if I'm "celiac" or "gluten intolerant" or whatever. My life sucked for decades before I went GF and that's all that matters!
    From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2008
    Posts
    206

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    I am one of the 'self-diagnosed', haha. Very suddenly about three years ago I felt awful. I thought I had a low grade flu, but it never went away. I just felt bad all the time. Some days I literally could not get out of bed to go to work, I was so fatigued. I've always slept a lot but I was sleeping 12 hours a day.

    My doctor could find nothing wrong with me except low iron. I started taking a supplement with lots of iron and also lots of b12 and felt only marginally better. I continued to complain to my doctor because I did not feel right at all. I researched my symptoms and gluten sensitivity kept coming up. Trouble uptaking iron and b12 is one of the symptoms, and I needed to take a ton of it to feel just OK.

    I saw Dr. Fuhrman on PBS and read his book "Eat To Live." I realized that my diet was awful. I didn't think it was awful, I never ate fast food or a lot of junk, but I realized I was eating way too many grains, and just not getting enough nutrients.

    Whenever I stick to his food plan religiously, I feel wonderful. It's basically a vegan diet. Also, I have never had a weight problem but my stomach has always looked funny -- bloated. But I hadn't noticed how much discomfort I was in until it went away from eating better.

    A few weeks ago I was away from home and desperately hungry so I had a bagel. Immediately my stomach blew up like a balloon and I was very uncomfortable for hours.

    I would recommend reading Eat To Live. Borrow it from the library. There is a lot of nutrition info in there. It totally motivated me to eat better. Arthritis and joint pain is one of the ailments that he says can be reversed with the right foods. I don't think gluten free is difficult if you're following Eat To Live, because it's a simple and straightforward eating plan with no processed stuff where gluten might be hiding.

    It sounds like a drastic, radical way to eat when you're used to SAD (Standard American Diet) like I was, but if you try it for a week and you feel better, it becomes much easier. I thought it was going to be IMPOSSIBLE but it is not as hard as it sounds.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,445

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    I agree with whitewolfe -- eating gluten free is easy! Just stay away from processed foods, which you should do anyway, and there's no problem.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2012
    Location
    La La Land
    Posts
    904

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    I find my diet bothers other people a whole lot more than me. I really dont mind it , and I do feel better. However my mom and DH are constantly trying to hyjack, or railroad me. If I cheated on my diet as much as they want me to, I wouldnt be on a diet at all.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,558

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pony Fixer View Post

    In the end, it doesn't matter if I'm "celiac" or "gluten intolerant" or whatever. My life sucked for decades before I went GF and that's all that matters!

    It might matter if it is accompanied by other auto immune disorders that may be or have been contributing to some of your symptoms or other issues. That was the case with me. Something kicked this all off about 5 years ago, and since then it's been one auto immune disorder after another. Then the Celiac kicked up and now we are on top of that (thank God, what a hassle it is, and painful). Plus an official diagnosis makes the increased costs of gluten free eating tax deductible, which for some people makes a huge difference whether they can actually do it or not.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
    Location
    Center of the Universe
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    7,806

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    I avoid eating inflammatory foods- no dairy except the occasional bit of cheese, rarely eat any grains or breads or baked goods, never eat things like pasta, try to eat a lot of sources of omega-3 fatty acids (fish, free-range meats, free-range eggs), try to select anti-inflammatory sources of carbs like sweet potatoes rather than inflammatory sources like white potatoes. I feel quite good. My knees used to ache a lot, and now they don't.
    This website gives little "inflammatory factor" measures for each food item, plus lots of other nutritional details: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...d-pasta/5707/2

    I don't know how you would eat an anti-inflammatory vegan diet- vegan diets are almost always very high in carbs; and most carb sources, like rice, are inflammatory. And most vegan diets rely on legumes for protein, and most legumes are inflammatory.

    Having celiac disease/ eating gluten-free diets is a different issue than eating an anti-inflammatory diet- it is true that most anti-inflammatory diets are gluten-free, but it is not true that all or most gluten-free diets are anti-inflammatory.

    most low-carb diets are anti-inflammatory.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2008
    Posts
    325

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    Eating gluten free has made a whole world of difference for me. I was diagnosed with jeuvanile rheumatoid arthritis when I was 16, and the first thing they recomended to me was to try gluten free. It was pretty easy back then living with my parents. They just made the whole household diet gluten free. They still had other snack stuff for my brother and sister that wasn't, but I just didn't eat that. I remember my Dad commenting on how much better his joints felt to when we did it.

    Now, 5 years later and living on my own I still try but I slip up every now and again. When I lived in a dorm the cafeteria had a gluten free section so I always got food from there. And there is a great resteraunt up the street with some great GF food and the owner was nice enough to give me some of his recipes. But I can definitely tell when I slip up (aka last night at the Super Bowl party. Feel like crap!)

    It's pretty easy once you get into the swing of it. It's definitely a lot more cooking and less processes foods. But the relief I get from it is soooo worth it.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
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    Center of the Universe
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    these are in rodents, but very interesting. Going gluten-free even if you don't have celiac disease may be very beneficial:
    J Nutr Biochem. 2012 Dec 17. pii: S0955-2863(12)00226-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2012.08.009. [Epub ahead of print]

    Gluten-free diet reduces adiposity, inflammation and insulin resistance associated with the induction of PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma expression.

    Soares FL, de Oliveira Matoso R, Teixeira LG, Menezes Z, Pereira SS, Alves AC, Batista NV, de Faria AM, Cara DC, Ferreira AV, Alvarez-Leite JI.


    Source

    Departamento de Alimentos, Faculdade de Farmácia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil; Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. Electronic address: fabiola_lacerda@yahoo.com.br.


    Abstract

    Gluten exclusion (protein complex present in many cereals) has been proposed as an option for the prevention of diseases other than coeliac disease. However, the effects of gluten-free diets on obesity and its mechanisms of action have not been studied. Thus, our objective was to assess whether gluten exclusion can prevent adipose tissue expansion and its consequences. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet containing 4.5% gluten (Control) or no gluten (GF). Body weight and adiposity gains, leukocyte rolling and adhesion, macrophage infiltration and cytokine production in adipose tissue were assessed. Blood lipid profiles, glycaemia, insulin resistance and adipokines were measured. Expression of the PPAR-α and γ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), carnitine palmitoyl acyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), insulin receptor, GLUT-4 and adipokines were assessed in epidydimal fat. Gluten-free animals showed a reduction in body weight gain and adiposity, without changes in food intake or lipid excretion. These results were associated with up-regulation of PPAR-α, LPL, HSL and CPT-1, which are related to lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation. There was an improvement in glucose homeostasis and pro-inflammatory profile-related overexpression of PPAR-γ. Moreover, intravital microscopy showed a lower number of adhered cells in the adipose tissue microvasculature. The overexpression of PPAR-γ is related to the increase of adiponectin and GLUT-4. Our data support the beneficial effects of gluten-free diets in reducing adiposity gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. The data suggests that diet gluten exclusion should be tested as a new dietary approach to prevent the development of obesity and metabolic disorders.

    Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


    PMID: 23253599 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Middle USA
    Posts
    2,406

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    A good friend went gluten -free in hopes of helping her daughter and it turns out the muscle aches/weakness problems that plagued her for years got much, much better.



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