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  1. #1
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    Jan. 6, 2008
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    Area II, the Blue Ridge Mountains
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    Default Designing and building xc jumps for schooling

    I am hoping to get some xc schooling fences built this year (um, when this friggin snow ends), and would love suggestions on affordable, adjustable xc jumps. I have a field of about 10 acres that I can use.

    I recall the jump cup/standards for xc that were at the USEA Convention back when it was in Reston. I would like to get a couple of those. I also have some terrific but big logs that could be dragged out of the woods. They are from a large and mature oak tree that fell last year. I have a tractor but I really doubt it can drag the logs, so I will have to hire someone to come in and move them. I'm not sure how affordable that will be, but I hate to waste those incredible logs, that range from BN to Training height.

    Anyone have experience with this? (I am sure!). Advice on affordability, innovation, etc.?

    Ann



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2009
    Location
    Garden Prairie, Illinois
    Posts
    208

    Default

    If you look back about a year or so, the USEA magazine has an article by Dan Starck discussing XC jump building techniques.

    Dan also did a weekend jump building clinic with the IDCTA at Wayne a few years ago. We assembled several xc jumps and build two ditches for the xc course.
    Inese


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 6, 2007
    Posts
    258

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ahbaumgardner View Post
    I am hoping to get some xc schooling fences built this year (um, when this friggin snow ends), and would love suggestions on affordable, adjustable xc jumps. I have a field of about 10 acres that I can use.

    I recall the jump cup/standards for xc that were at the USEA Convention back when it was in Reston. I would like to get a couple of those. I also have some terrific but big logs that could be dragged out of the woods. They are from a large and mature oak tree that fell last year. I have a tractor but I really doubt it can drag the logs, so I will have to hire someone to come in and move them. I'm not sure how affordable that will be, but I hate to waste those incredible logs, that range from BN to Training height.

    Anyone have experience with this? (I am sure!). Advice on affordability, innovation, etc.?

    Ann

    Those cups are cute, but do not do anything that you can't do just as well with a $2 piece of rope.

    Big logs can be moved with small tractors or trucks (by persons with reasonable farm skills) by using an improvised sled : a piece of tin, car hood, plastic garbage can lid, etc, placed under the leading edge. Proviso: big logs can also mess you up if you don't know what you are doing (just like big horses).

    A small investment to buy the time of an experienced coursebuilder can reap terrific savings of time and money. Network and find out who might be close to you or traveling by and could stop in for a half day or day ($150-400) and give you a plan.


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  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by groom View Post
    Those cups are cute, but do not do anything that you can't do just as well with a $2 piece of rope.
    Really? I am unsure how I can use rope for easily adjusted jumps. I am guessing that maybe you have loops of rope tied into/fastened onto the post/standards? Would love to see a pic or diagram of this. I sure don't want to spend the $$ on the heavy duty cups if I can use something so much cheaper.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2005
    Posts
    2,268

    Default

    I have this book http://www.amazon.com/Design-Build-C...d_bxgy_b_img_y

    There is another by Mike Etherington-Smith.

    One reviewer from Michigan reviews both and likes the first one better, and says the latter one is more for professional-type courses. I'd like to look at the Etherington-Smith book sometime, but found the Morshead book to be very good. I also relied on the rules which is helpful. There is a lot of good information around the net, but I could not find the Dan Starck article mentioned above.

    If you use the logs, make sure you apply something that will preserve the wood. Otherwise they will decay rapidly. I did that with some small logs years ago, but didn't preserve them. They were just small and it didn't really matter, but even in our dry climate, the rate of disintergration was pretty amazing.


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  6. #6
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    Jun. 16, 2009
    Location
    Gray Court, SC
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    Default

    You may check out this book or this book or the one I have which is pretty good for basic builders.

    I've built two from my book, then got creative on #3. I have @ 6 acres to play in.


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  7. #7
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    Default

    Thanks JP60! I just ordered the book you have from Amazon. I will hire someone to come in and help me but I am trying to avoid a course designer, because I want to to build jumps very gradually. I also want to build portables but I am guessing that one can do that with these designs just by putting the jumps on skids... We shall see.

    I also have those big logs to move and for that, I may hire someone. This 50-something gal may be better off doing it that way!

    Ann

    Quote Originally Posted by JP60 View Post
    You may check out this book or this book or the one I have which is pretty good for basic builders.

    I've built two from my book, then got creative on #3. I have @ 6 acres to play in.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2001
    Location
    Tennessee
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    6,516

    Default

    I've built some xc jumps myself. (LAZ had a XC jump building clinic a few years ago that was fantastic!) But the next time I get gung-ho to do more I think I'm going to use my time and resources to build a ditch that has a narrow side and a wider side. By dragging poles and standards out to it I think it is usable for a ton of different questions as well as useful at every level. Probably a bit more expensive, but a lot more bang for the buck.

    Hearing that you want to make this a large and long term project makes me think you should at least look into hiring a designer. A half day of some one walking around your place and noodling out some concepts might be well worth the expense in the long run. You'll either save money or end up with something better than if it's mish-mashed together over time or both.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Default

    ^^^ I hear you subk... and am considering that. Thanks!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2009
    Location
    Gray Court, SC
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    Default

    Don't forget a truck with some chain will work just as well as a small tractor in a pinch. Also, a basic hydraulic jack or lift can help get a heavy log or jump up enough to insert a skid for towing.

    In total I have four, 2'+ roll top (I am just starting out), 2'3"+ steps, 2'6" coop and a 2'7"+ "cottage" (my own creation). No logs yet, but the issue for me with logs is not having any dead trees on my land. I'd have to get something delivered and I've not wanted to spring $$ for that yet.

    That book is great for the basics. When I built my first jumps I kept them 8' long and provided the means to tack them down, but pull them up and move them around (which will happen this season to stop the boredom). A way of saying they don't have to stop a tank. 5/8 plywood is a good choice, but for planking I went with deck planking, not 2x?, in part for weight, cost, and the fact that this is mainly for me, not a show.

    The benefit from smaller width jumps at home is that when you go to a show they look almost easy I don't have a lot of space, but I am going to put two more jumps in that will be more set. I have cross ties (@ $15 a piece) that I'll stack with spacers to make a vertical "wall", using rebar to lock in place. What I like about that style is that I can increase size as I get better by just adding one piece at a time.

    The other I'd like to do is a log. I think I'll build "legs" to support it and brush to fill in the gap, but when I want to make it a hanging log, remove the brush. This way the log does not have to be massive. I feel for practicing purposes the idea is getting use to the "look" of a log, not just the size.

    All the best. I love building things, I just wish I had more time and space to do so.


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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Lodi Ohio
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    1,419

    Default

    Jump for Joy makes some really neat portable-type cross country fences. They are easy to adjust and versatile.


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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Location
    Western South Dakota
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ahbaumgardner View Post
    I am hoping to get some xc schooling fences built this year (um, when this friggin snow ends), and would love suggestions on affordable, adjustable xc jumps. I have a field of about 10 acres that I can use.

    I recall the jump cup/standards for xc that were at the USEA Convention back when it was in Reston. I would like to get a couple of those. I also have some terrific but big logs that could be dragged out of the woods. They are from a large and mature oak tree that fell last year. I have a tractor but I really doubt it can drag the logs, so I will have to hire someone to come in and move them. I'm not sure how affordable that will be, but I hate to waste those incredible logs, that range from BN to Training height.

    Anyone have experience with this? (I am sure!). Advice on affordability, innovation, etc.?

    Ann
    We have built several xc jumps using cottonwood logs and used electric poles we were able to get from the electric company. Don't be afraid to ask your local electric company, you might be surprised. We have also used tires and hay bales. You can move quite a big log with a moderate sized tractor and it helps if you are handy with a chainsaw.


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  13. #13
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    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Azle, Teh-has
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    Default

    Jumps are really easy to build...but really hard. lol.
    Easy as in...it's really not that hard to whip up a basic table, house or rolltop. Hard in that you'll be soaking your aching body for a few days.

    The jump cups you talk about are like $250 a set (don't quote me). I remember looking into them about 2 years ago and pooping myself when I saw the price.

    You can build 2 rolltops for that price.

    The basic design for XC jumps are a sled made of 4x4s. And a rib cage made of foundation 4x4s and then 2x6s/2x8s/2x10s or 2x12s cut in the shape desired.
    Then just slap on what you want for the shell. I prefer the 5/6ths x 6 in planks.

    Really you only HAVE to have a drill and a hand held circular saw.
    I consider myself a weekend builder but it's gotten a little out of control.

    here are some pics of what I've done. Takes about a day to whip one out. The stair steps took me 3 days. I spend a lot of time staring the jumps sometimes trying to figure out what the heck to do next.
    The learning curve def can take a few hours out of the day. ; )

    I'd be happy to help with further questions if needed. Just shoot me a PM.

    I've never shared a link but apparently this should work. Let me know if it's botched.

    http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?s...1&l=2c825e1b5e
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!


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  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,371

    Default

    Another useful book is The ABC's of Cross-Country Design
    and Construction compiled by Sally O'Connor for the USCTA
    published in 1997. Sadly, it is out-of-print and the used
    copies are over $200 (!) each for a 100 page paperback
    so borrowing it through interlibrary loan is probably the
    best strategy. Line drawings of 65 types of fences. Some
    contruction advice and good tips on course design concerns.
    Out of date now with current rules and only up to prelim
    level (no BN, didn't exist when book was published).
    I wish the USCTA would put out a revised version.
    Last edited by Robin@DHH; Feb. 5, 2013 at 11:56 AM.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin


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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
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    1,900

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post

    Really you only HAVE to have a drill and a hand held circular saw.



    http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?s...1&l=2c825e1b5e

    Would this apply to making basic upright standards or wing standards, and some fillers for show jumping jumps?

    I'm interested in making some basic show jumps in the spring. I already have the drill, but was wondering what else I might need.


    Fantastic XC jumps btw!



  16. #16
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    Jan. 6, 2008
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    OMG! Your jumps are gorgeous!!! Did you find a design somewhere or was this all your own?

    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post

    I'd be happy to help with further questions if needed. Just shoot me a PM.

    I've never shared a link but apparently this should work. Let me know if it's botched.

    http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?s...1&l=2c825e1b5e



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2011
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    I've built jumps into my fence lines. There are coops like in fox hunting. I've got verticals. I have also built some rail jumps that have space for two rails side by side. These allows me to put greenery in between to create a hedge jump. Along on of our trails we had trees come down and I create things around them like bounces, etc.

    Things don't always have to look like they just came off a cross country course.
    "I couldn't find my keys, so I put her in the trunk"


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  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Lodi Ohio
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    Default

    website:

    hitechhorsejumps.com

    There is a cross country section.



  19. #19
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    Apr. 11, 2001
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    Tennessee
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post
    Really you only HAVE to have a drill and a hand held circular saw.
    Yes, but I'd probably add a handheld angle grinder to the list of tools. That's what lets you soften the sharp edges.

    Ann it really does come down to learning how to build the basic frame work then skinning it. Maybe LAZ will show up here. I would imagine she's got some pictures of the under carriage of a few jumps before the outside has been added. Once you understand how they are constructed you can pretty much figure out how to adjust it for any shape.


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  20. #20
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    Feb. 4, 2001
    Location
    Sheridan, IN
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    Default

    It's well worth paying a consulting fee to a course builder to help you get started. I've gone from 0 to 70+ XC jumps (including a bank complex, some ditches and a water complex) over the last few years. The best thing I've done was hire a quality course designer/builder to come give me a hand. He showed me how to build things safely, has built a number of beautiful fences for me, sited my water jump (not where I would have put it, but he was right and it works wonderfully where it is.

    i would also say that unless you're going to host a lot of shows or clinics that you're better off going someplace that has a lot of jumps already, if you have a few at home once you've jumped them they'll not get that much use. Build yourself a couple of ditches & a bank complex & that would be much more useful.


    2 members found this post helpful.

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