The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    199

    Default How to choose between Eventing and Hunter/Jumper?

    I might have the opportunity, in the next year, to be a working student for eventer Phyllis Dawson. I would love it, but before I get involved, I need to think about what I want to focus on in the equestrian world. Right now, I show small hunter shows, not very high heights, but I do know that I love to jump. I also love flatwork, and I have always wanted to start eventing. Before I get in touch with Phyllis, I'm asking all of you to help guide me a little. What are those 2 disciplines like, and what do they require? I can't decide what direction to take right now, and I need help. :/



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2001
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa.
    Posts
    5,493

    Default

    You can do many disciplines. In fact in the old days many big name riders did cross disciplines.

    So find what you want to do most now and go do it. Nothing is keeping you from doing any more disciplines in the future.

    Emily
    "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2013
    Posts
    125

    Default

    As Xctrygirl said, you can participate and train in any variety of disciplines. Proper instruction and experience, regardless of whether it's hunters, jumpers, dressage, or cross country, is invaluable and will only serve to make you a better, well-rounded rider.

    I spent most of my teen years training to perfect the hunter ride, now I'm working more on the forward jumper ride. If I had the horse to, I'd go out with the local fox hunting team for the thrill and the new experience. Don't turn down a challenge or an opportunity just because it's not what you've been doing. Aim to be a confident rider and experienced horse person regardless of the discipline or whether you are schooling in an arena or out on a field.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
    Location
    The Part of TN in the Wrong Time Zone
    Posts
    2,087

    Default

    Go for it. It's a great opportunity for you to learn more, regardless of the discipline.
    .אני יכול לעשות הכל על ידי אלוהים



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2008
    Posts
    5,042

    Default

    Phyllis Dawson is great and would be an excellent opportunity for you.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    199

    Default

    Ok, thanks guys! I just was thinking about that. I mean, I have never evented before in my life, but I would love too.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2002
    Location
    Cow County, MD
    Posts
    7,106

    Default

    I started out at an eventing barn, switched in my early teens to hunters and did the Big Eq, then had a gig after college in a foxhunting barn. Each discipline has taught me a lot, and I wouldn't train the cross-experience for anything.
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    3,371

    Default

    Eventing is a blast. I grew up doing Pony Club rallies and horse trials. The only reason I'm at a H/J barn now is that this barn is accessible to where I live.

    I have found that though there are some obvious differences in the two disciplines, good riding is good riding. If you have an experienced, ethical instructor who has your interests and your horse's welfare at heart, you can only benefit, regardless of discipline.

    Ideally, both disciplines require a lot of flat work before the jumps are attempted. At our barn, we have a lot of flat lessons in which we learn to get a horse to move from behind, get him listening, and work up to basic lateral movements and counter canter, etc.--all similar to what you would learn in your dressage lessons at the eventing barn.

    When you event, you (obviously) ride out of the ring more, and over fences, boldness in both horse and rider is highly valued. When I started riding at the H/J barn, I remember having trouble adjusting to the mindset that an even pace was of paramount importance, and that my horse's "giving me a big one" over a fence was no longer considered good. However, I was able to teach my fellow H/J riders a few things, too: for example, how to slip the reins when the horse takes off at an unexpected spot (which I did automatically thanks to my years of experience riding drop fences) and how to use a pulley rein when a horse gets stung by a bee and takes off.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2007
    Location
    Zone IV/Area III
    Posts
    1,215

    Default

    I do hunters and eventing. They are very different. I've been doing hunters for 13 years and eventing for just 2 or 3. I love the thrill of XC, but I do very much have a passion for the perfection of hunters. They are very different ball games. Coming from a hunter and jumper past, I find myself doing better in stadium than most people. Then again I was on my old h/j horse, so he and I both ate up stadium like it was a jumper round.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,301

    Default

    Phyllis has a pretty good reputation for producung working students and assistant trainers that go on to bigger things.

    Several of her current/former empoyees/working students post here, so you might ask them.

    I think anything you learn with Phyllis will stand you in good stead in any discipline.
    Last edited by Janet; Feb. 3, 2013 at 08:22 PM.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2001
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,630

    Default

    Firstly, ditto Janet that Phyllis Dawson is someone well respected who will give you a good education and foundation whatever discipline you end up deciding to ride.

    Secondly, I don't think you have to choose between Eventing and H/J. Especially between Eventing and Jumpers, where I know plenty of people who take even upper level horses to jumper shows for milage. Last year, I did a mix of Hunter shows, Jumper Shows, Events, and even Dressage shows! A good foundation will serve you well, whatever you ultimately decide to do--but you can't know whether you want do do something if you don't ever try it!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 7, 2010
    Posts
    1,229

    Default

    An opportunity with a trainer who does right by his/her working students is golden!
    What you can learn, in terms of barn management, horsemanship, and the running of a successful business, is huge.
    That you will be specifically working towards events, rather than hunter/jumper shows, is not too important unless you specifically were trying to 'do the Big Eq' before you aged out.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2010
    Location
    recent transplant to the Peper
    Posts
    558

    Default

    Who says you have to choose? My jumper does eventing as well, and my hunter is going to start this spring. I feel like it is also mentally refreshing for both horses. Good riding is good riding regardless of what discipline you say you belong to.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2009
    Location
    the South
    Posts
    248

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MoonLadyIsis View Post
    Who says you have to choose? My jumper does eventing as well, and my hunter is going to start this spring. I feel like it is also mentally refreshing for both horses. Good riding is good riding regardless of what discipline you say you belong to.
    Exactly. A good horseman will take a little of everything they've learned and tailor a program that works for them. Hell, I'm riding green stock horses now and I'm finding things to work on with my hunter back at home. Said hunter has shown jumpers successfully, schooled cross country up to prelim, even done a western playday! I think a rider with good basics can be successful in any discipline (have you seen the video of the reiner and dressage rider switching horses?) and there's so much you'll miss out on if you limit yourself to one aspect of the horse world.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    32,208

    Default

    If you do have the opportunity to be a WS with somebody of Ms Dawsons reputation?

    Consider the door opened and, please, go thru it. Those positions are difficult to get and 90% of anything you learn will be applicable to the upper levels of any discipline. Plus you would get exposure to the Dressage, the CC as well as Show Jumping. And make valuable contacts that can help you later you otherwise would never meet.

    These successful trainers well know what the other disciplines need in a prospect and frequently talented horses that don't want to get their feet wet go from Eventing to SJ. And equally good horses wash out of SJ because they lack the scope for the big sticks in a show ring but have plenty out of a good gallop to clear a CC obstacle-and they don't mind jumping into water. Riders go both ways as well, sometimes because that's the way the horse they have wants to go.

    If you get offered this? I can't see a single negative. It's a terrific opportunity.

    Oh, what would be required of you? The same as in any other top level barn, alot of work managing upper level horses and a good attitude...I don't think she has any minimum requirements as far as jump heights go if you are otherwise experienced and have the drive. If she does, they will be stated outright, not a secret. I wouldnt let that stop you from going after it.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    199

    Default

    Ok, thanks to all of you. I understand now that a good rider will be good in any discipline. I'm not in with Pyhllis yet, but I have the chance to be. I'm just trying to get my parents on board....not too easy. I live a few states away from her farm in Virginia, and I would like to go for 6 months to a year before college...does this sound like a good plan? Or do you all suggest something different?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Horserider15 View Post
    Ok, thanks to all of you. I understand now that a good rider will be good in any discipline. I'm not in with Pyhllis yet, but I have the chance to be. I'm just trying to get my parents on board....not too easy. I live a few states away from her farm in Virginia, and I would like to go for 6 months to a year before college...does this sound like a good plan? Or do you all suggest something different?
    If you have the chance to work for Phyllis, do whatever it takes to get yourself there. That is a world class opportunity.

    I imagine it will require a year-long commitment, which makes sense as you have to accept that it will take you a while to climb that learning curve to the point where you are truly "useful" in a program like that.

    My suggestion with respect to your parents is that you agree to apply to college at HS graduation and elect to defer admission for a year, rather than waiting for the following year to apply. That will help them see that you are committed to going to college at the end of the gap year and might help make them more comfortable approving your plan.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2011
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    4,809

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Horserider15 View Post
    I might have the opportunity, in the next year, to be a working student for eventer Phyllis Dawson.
    This means that you have seen an advertisement that P.D. takes on working students , doesn't it?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    199

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skydy View Post
    This means that you have seen an advertisement that P.D. takes on working students , doesn't it?
    Yeah, and I went to her website and found it very appealing.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
    Posts
    4,944

    Default

    [QUOTE=Horserider15;6817312]Yeah, and I went to her website and found it very appealing.[/]

    Do you own a decent horse that is sound enough to be ridden 5 days a week in a program? I have known working students for Phyllis and the program is designed around having a competent horse to bring along.



Similar Threads

  1. Hunter/Jumper or Eventing barns in Knoxville, TN!
    By Julie.AvaLu117 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sep. 24, 2011, 03:48 PM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: Apr. 2, 2011, 12:03 AM
  3. Hunter/Jumper/Eventing barns in or near Toronto
    By Across Sicily in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Oct. 26, 2009, 11:18 PM
  4. Replies: 60
    Last Post: Aug. 28, 2009, 10:21 PM
  5. Eventing to Hunter/Jumper back to Eventing?
    By springdaisy in forum Eventing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Jun. 30, 2009, 08:52 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •