The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,495

    Default Kosher salt question-yes HR

    Other than being blessed by a Rabbi, is there any difference between regular table salt and Kosher salt?

    Obviously I'm not Jewish.

    I normally buy regular table salt, 4 lb boxes, from BJ's for the horses. This last wk BJ's were out of regular salt and only had Kosher salt or Sea salt and I'm really low on the salt I give the horses so I bought Kosher salt. I don't have to feed it today or for the next few days so if there is a difference I can go to the local grocery store and buy the regular table salt. I really hate making any changes to my horses diet.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    18,867

    Default

    http://lmgtfy.com/?q=kosher+salt+vs+table+salt

    Seriously though, kosher salt doesn't have additives. It's probably better for the horses than table salt.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,495

    Default

    Thanks for the link LauraKY. I also checked on the comparison of Kosher to Sea salt and Sea salt to Table salt.

    Very interesting reading.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2012
    Posts
    109

    Default

    fun fact: it's actually called kosher salt because it is used in the koshering process for meat, not because it meets dietary laws- almost all salt meets those requirements.

    you will probably need to use a larger volume of kosher salt. it's less dense, so if you just measure the same size scoop, you'll be getting less salt.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2009
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    2,228

    Default

    All salt comes from the sea!

    However, it is a fact that all salt was once in a sea somewhere.

    I think the table salt, though, has iodine and stuff added to it, so I would buy kosher or sea salt labled as sea salt if that's all that's in it before, say, morton's?
    Trainer's website - photos of my horse Airborne under About and Francesca Edwards also in media page 1

    http://www.patricianorciadressage.com/



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Plainview, MN
    Posts
    3,556

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ambitious Kate View Post
    All salt comes from the sea!

    However, it is a fact that all salt was once in a sea somewhere.

    I think the table salt, though, has iodine and stuff added to it, so I would buy kosher or sea salt labled as sea salt if that's all that's in it before, say, morton's?
    Iodized salt is labeled iodized salt.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    517

    Default

    Chefs often use kosher salt because as its already been stated it has no additives. It's also more coarsely ground than regular table salt. It is probably better for the horses but the only thing I'd say to watch out for, having tasted the difference in my own cooking I find it to taste a bit saltier so I use less when cooking with it. Maybe because it has no additives there's more salt per tsp? Also kosher salt can often be found in huge boxes (koshering process uses a lot of salt) so it might be more cost effective than bulk table salt.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2005
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    4,924

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ambitious Kate View Post
    All salt comes from the sea!

    However, it is a fact that all salt was once in a sea somewhere.

    I think the table salt, though, has iodine and stuff added to it, so I would buy kosher or sea salt labled as sea salt if that's all that's in it before, say, morton's?
    Iodized salt won't hurt. In fact, iodine is necessary for proper thyroid function. Having a little extra in the diet is just fine.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,495

    Default

    Interestingly, the Morton Table Salt I get from Bj's only lists it as table salt, not iodized salt. When I go to the local grocery store tomorrow I'll add a container of Morton's salt to my shopping list and see if all the additives are listed on the container the way they are listed in the article that I read from LauraKY's post.

    The horses get 1 oz each in their AM and PM dinners. It's mixed with nice warm beet pulp so I'm hoping they don't notice a difference. One horse eats anything in his tub but the other one tends to leave anywhere from a 1/4 cup to sometimes a little over a cup/feeding. If he leaves it in the morning, it gets put back in the fridge and added to dinner. If he leaves some at dinner, his tub stays in his stall until the 10 PM barn check. Then if there is anything left, it does get dumped. Usually it's only about 1/4 cup or less.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    Not all salt comes from the sea.

    LOTS come from lakes and from mines, as in underground mining mines.

    I have fed kosher salt to my horses. If I see white salt on sale, I buy it.

    For horses a pound of white salt is a pound of white salt; whether it is blessed :-) , on sale, in bulk, in the block or brick, from the sea, a lake or mine.

    I never feed red salt ever.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,495

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rmh_rider View Post
    I have fed kosher salt to my horses. If I see white salt on sale, I buy it.

    For horses a pound of white salt is a pound of white salt; whether it is blessed :-) , on sale, in bulk, in the block or brick, from the sea, a lake or mine.
    Considering I have 2 retirees, one 24 and the other 21, I don't think iodized salt, non-iodized salt, kosher salt or even red salt will kill them.

    Sometimes I think some of us get a bit too technical or anal or whatever.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    9,065

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rmh_rider View Post
    Not all salt comes from the sea.

    LOTS come from lakes and from mines, as in underground mining mines.

    I have fed kosher salt to my horses. If I see white salt on sale, I buy it.

    For horses a pound of white salt is a pound of white salt; whether it is blessed :-) , on sale, in bulk, in the block or brick, from the sea, a lake or mine.

    I never feed red salt ever.
    If I remember by Geology correctly those salt deposits under Kansas, Michigan, etc. were once sea beds. So it's technically correct that all salt comes from the sea. Or at least bodies of water. They may have dried up several hundred millena back but they were once "seas."

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,203

    Default

    I would want the iodized salt, b/c as someone said, it is needed for thyroid function. The reason you don't see many goiters these days is iodized salt.

    However, I have heard (chem teacher can correct me), that a lot of the iodine has left the salt after normal salt sitting around time, unless there is dextrose added.

    Morton's salt (and maybe others) has an anticaking agent (when it rains, it pours).



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    51

    Default

    Neither kind is "blessed by a rabbi" - no amount of "blessing by a rabbi" will make something that's non-kosher, kosher. "Kosher" has to do with choice of ingredients and manufacturing/cooking methods only, not hocus-pocus.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,495

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AnyDayButSaturday View Post
    Neither kind is "blessed by a rabbi" - no amount of "blessing by a rabbi" will make something that's non-kosher, kosher. "Kosher" has to do with choice of ingredients and manufacturing/cooking methods only, not hocus-pocus.
    Thanks.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



Similar Threads

  1. Anybody else keep kosher?
    By heavensdew in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Oct. 11, 2011, 11:44 AM
  2. rubbing alcohol and also salt question
    By saitou_amaya in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Aug. 5, 2011, 08:00 AM
  3. Replies: 8
    Last Post: Oct. 31, 2010, 02:47 PM
  4. Redmond salt vs. Celtic salt vs. local sea salt....
    By pintopiaffe in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Dec. 25, 2009, 06:20 PM
  5. So Is It Kosher to Race a One Eyed Horse?
    By imissvixen in forum Racing
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: Jul. 10, 2009, 06:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness