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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    2,961

    Default Pelvic Fracture: need jingles and ideas

    My 22 year old QH fractured his pelvis three days ago after my big horse chased him in the ice/snow. He slipped down a small incline and went down hard on his right side. He's been completely non-weight bearing for three days now on the R hind leg, and is really well sedated, on pain meds, and the vet is pptimistic. I'm considering trying a sling with him as I'm really worried about supporting limb laminitis, and I can't even pick the leg up off the ground to pick out his foot, put any sort of boot on, nothing. He's wearing a Back on Track sheet as well as leg wraps behind, and I have him on Siliforce for bone healing. Am I missing anything? He's my primary riding horse and a real gentleman, and I don't want to lose him.
    send some of their smart literate deer who can read road signs up here since ours are just run of the mill dumb ones who get splatted all over creation because they won't stay in the woods



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,708

    Default

    It sounds like you are doing everything right to me. I believe the key is keeping him quiet which you are already doing. Mega jingles from my irreplaceable old man to yours.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2010
    Location
    california
    Posts
    4,046

    Default

    Candle, I am so sorry about your boy. My vet had thought my horse had a pelvic fracture last Monday and after the 'walking rectal" said no fracture. How was the fracture diagnosed for your guy, if you don't mind my asking ?

    Again, I know how stressfull this time is, my horse is doing better but it was a tough sight to see when I found him Sunday afternoon.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2009
    Posts
    815

    Default

    I had a welsh cob who fractured his pelvis and was non weight bearing for THREE MONTHS. Three days after the three month mark (which was the vet's time table for "we put him down if he doesn't put it down in three months") he put the hind toe on the floor. Three days after that the hoof was weight bearing. He is now sound and a pleasure horse. Hang in there!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,161

    Default

    One of mine was a pelvic fracture suspect until they were able to rule it out (via in-clinic radiographs and a bone scan). He was non weight bearing for 1.5 months.

    IMO, if you're thinking of slinging him (and I fully support that and think it's in his best interests), I would strongly suggest bringing him to a hospital if you can afford it. Mine was in a sling for the entire 1.5 months and he had someone outside his stall 24 hours a day to let him up/down as necessary, and to be there in case of an emergency. He was a star and tolerated it like a champ, but often kept vet students busy asking to be lifted up/down every 15 minutes (he learned to jingle the harness) so he could stand or hang as he preferred. I would never sling a horse at home, now knowing what is involved for safety.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2008
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
    Posts
    2,507

    Default

    My 22 year old gelding fractured his pelvis several years ago. Feel free to contact me if you want any support, I've sure been there. Prognosis depends on location and displacement of fracture. My horse had a slightly displaced fracture clean through the ileum (bone between SI and hip joint), so a 'good' spot.

    My horse could not be transported, so I got an ultrasound specialist vet out who knows pelvis structure well. This was so helpful, and all the imaging ever done with my guy. Cost effective too. She did both rectal and external ultrasound to figure out the fracture. Talk to your vet about who can do this for you. IMO, getting a really solid idea of where the injury is helps you make a decision about whether and how to proceed.

    Having had a similar experience, where we could not lift the good foot to get support on it, I bedded the stall in material that would provide good sole support for all feet. I used sawdust for good grip and support. You could try fine flake shavings, sand, etc. Also kept the supporting limbs wrapped. I too fed silica.

    Usually the high is high lined (tied in the stall) for quite a long period, so he can't lay down and displace the fracture with the stress of getting down/up.

    It was a rough nearly 12 month layup but he healed and eventually became sound and went gradually into turnout, then went back to work and I rode him for a wonderful year after that. He even did Pony Club with my kids.

    Hugs to you. One solace I had is that bone injuries, once they heal up the repair is very strong, not like healed soft tissue injuries where you live the rest of your life wondering if it will break again. Go and look at a pelvis model and try to get the best understanding you can of its structure and where the fracture(s) are. I found this valuable as the months went by and we had our repeated ultrasounds.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2012
    Posts
    112

    Default

    Where specifically is the fracture located? Makes a difference.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2004
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    2,434

    Default

    I had a weanling that we thought had fractured her pelvis several years ago.......the vets were optomistic saying that was the best.....however 6 months in a stall!....ugh . She was three legged to start with, but got around quite well after that............good luck!
    www.flyingcolorsfarm.comHome of pinto stallion Claim to Fame and his homozygous son, Counterclaim. Friend us on Facebook!https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fl...04678589573428



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    I am so very sorry this has happened to your horse. I have no experience. But have had a horrible compound fracture myself. I know there is gonna be some pain, and rehab.

    Jingles, and prayers for both of your hurt horse.

    BAD big horse, BAD big horse.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    2,961

    Default

    I know!!!! BAD big horse!!!!!!!!! He's not trying to lie down, so I'm not high tying at this time. I'm nervous about slinging him, wouldn't that be more risky for possibly displacing it? I think if he starts looking miserable and loses his pep, I'll take him over to the hospital and have them sling him. He's looking happier than he was a few days ago, so I think the pain and ulcer meds are starting to work. I'll have to look at our sheet and see exactly where it's broken. The vet palpated internally and externally and watched the way he was standing and hopping. She had a portable X-ray machine but said she'd seen this exact clinical presentation in racehorses quite a few times, and she's really good. She thinks he'll come back riding sound. I feel so badly for him, I've had horses here for 10 years and nobody has ever gotten hurt in that place in the barn. On a funnier note, my Appaloosa ( the perpetrator) was found sleeping in the manure pile yesterday, I figure he knows he's on my sh!t list Please keep jingling, this old man is worth his smallish weight in gold to me.
    send some of their smart literate deer who can read road signs up here since ours are just run of the mill dumb ones who get splatted all over creation because they won't stay in the woods



  11. #11

    Default

    PM sent...



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2008
    Posts
    3,019

    Default

    Jingles



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,462

    Default

    One of the therpy horses broke their pelvis several years ago. Vet had us use bales of grass hay to make his stall into a standing stall size, the benefit being that he could nibble as desired, and lean on them to balance if needed, but couldn't lie down. He stayed in the stall for about 7 weeks if I remember correctly. But he completely recovered (was just doing w/t therapy rides).
    He was non weight bearing for quite a while.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2005
    Location
    Some where in the middle of nowhere.
    Posts
    3,595

    Default

    Had a friends mare break her pelvis starting out of a roping chute. She was non weight bearing , took a lot of drugs and over and hour to even get her back to her stall that night. She returned to full use in a little over a year.
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"



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