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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,682

    Default Handy tool for blanket drying

    Had to drag all the blankets into basement this AM since they are soaking wet from a sloppy overnight snow (the insides are dry). They weigh about 25lb each and I left a snowy mess across the first floor to get them into the basement. I need to get them dry before tonight (-30 windchills); they'd turn into blanket popsicles.

    Anyway, thought I'd share what I use for this, since it works really well: expandable clothes rack
    You can raise it high enough to keep the entire blanket off the ground and the arms are long enough that it's supported from withers to tail flap which really helps it dry out. And they're cheap.

    Thus concludes our Public Service Announcement. Back to your regular programming.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    20,117

    Default

    If you point fans at them, they'll dry even faster!
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    5,120

    Default

    If you happen to have a dehumidifier, they work well to speed the process, too.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,682

    Default

    Yup, that is in place too. The basement is now filled with the lovely smell of wet horse. And my poor husband is working from home due to the snow. He's not a big fan of today's proceedings.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2003
    Location
    Way up north in Lobsta Country
    Posts
    1,758

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    Yup, that is in place too. The basement is now filled with the lovely smell of wet horse. And my poor husband is working from home due to the snow. He's not a big fan of today's proceedings.
    There are many many smells a LOT worse than wet horse...
    the NOT!! Spoiled!! Arabian Protectavest poster pony lives on in my heart http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o...pscc2a5330.jpg



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2009
    Posts
    1,865

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by macmtn View Post
    There are many many smells a LOT worse than wet horse...
    Like wet dog Blech!

    I had to swap blankets last night too due to a constant downpour all freakin day. They are now dripping a nice stream of water into my barn aisle, where they are hanging to dry because we don't have a basement. Good call on the fans - I'm going to drag a couple down there when I get home from work. Not sure why that never occurred to me!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2011
    Posts
    432

    Default

    I use a step ladder in the garage for my wet blankets, but I'm in VA so my garage is usually above freezing temp even in the winter. Also my horses are smallish so the blankets are usually 66-68. You might need a bigger ladder if you have huge horses. Just buckle the chest straps around the topmost step and fan the blanket out so it's 'hugging' the ladder. You can then train a fan on the blanket from either side.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    500

    Default

    we have a woodstove in our house and it works fabulously to dry things out quickly. we keep a pot of water on top of the woodstove to keep the air from drying out too much, but it's nice to have everythign dry out quickly when it's necessary.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 21, 2006
    Location
    North of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    74

    Default

    I used to hang wet blankets over a clothes drying rack, but it only holds one at a time.

    I found that the easiest way for me to hang blankets to dry in my basement is to screw a couple of 3/4" cup hooks into the unfinished beams of my furnace room ceiling, spaced about 4 feet apart. I just hang the blanket up using the two back leg strap dees. (I have leg straps on ALL my blankets and sheets, even the Rambos, due to barn staff not figuring out that you have to put the tail strap UNDER the horse's tail to keep it from blowing up over the horse's head!)

    Most blankets dry overnight without help in the warmth of the furnace room, however if I need to speed things up, I just hook up a 24" box fan.

    Cheap and easy!

    (If your blanket doesn't have leg strap dees, you can use the buckles at the chest to hang it up - the key is to have it stretched out as much as possible to maximize the surface area to aid drying.)



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 27, 2012
    Posts
    163

    Default

    Ask at your local dry cleaner for the big blanket hangers, they are big enough and stout enough to hold a horse blanket. The first few they gave to me but when everybody wanted them I paid 25cents each. Worth it for winter blankets, saddle pads and some of my dog beds.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,682

    Default

    Yeah, I only have about 6-7 hours before it gets really ugly out there. They won't die of the cold, but it sure increases the misery factor in my bare fingers trying to attach blankets in -30 temps. I have two fans on the blankets and I'm sure they'll be dry in time. Or I'll send DH out to the store and put them in our clothes dryer.
    The thing I like about the clothes rack method is that at any given location, the water has the shortest distance possible to travel before it escapes. While the circulating air is helping things out, ultimately you need to get the water to sink down to the lowest point and then drip off. If you hang them high from one end, let's say the chest buckles, the moisture in the top half of the blanket has to travel 84" down to the tail flap before it can drip off or eventually evaporate. The top end will dry quickly but the butt end stays soggy a lot longer. By draping them over these racks, essentially in the same position they'd be on the horse, the water only has to travel about 25-30" down to the nearest "hemline" and then drip off.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2006
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    At the back of the line
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by macmtn View Post
    There are many many smells a LOT worse than wet horse...
    yeah like husband
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2006
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    At the back of the line
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    by draping them over these racks, essentially in the same position they'd be on the horse, the water only has to travel about 25-30" down to the nearest "hemline" and then drip off.
    Another cheap way to dry blankets--put big eyehooks in basement cieling like someone said above, tie a hayrope to one hook, let cat play with hayrope when not drying blankets , run hayrope under blanket like a spine and attach to other hook. If your hayrope is long enough you can run it thru other hook like a pully & raise the blanket up before tieing, giving room for all to hang down without hanging yourself in blanket when you walk underneath.

    And -30? Thats brutal!!!
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 21, 2006
    Location
    North of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    74

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    Yeah, I only have about 6-7 hours before it gets really ugly out there. They won't die of the cold, but it sure increases the misery factor in my bare fingers trying to attach blankets in -30 temps. I have two fans on the blankets and I'm sure they'll be dry in time. Or I'll send DH out to the store and put them in our clothes dryer.
    The thing I like about the clothes rack method is that at any given location, the water has the shortest distance possible to travel before it escapes. While the circulating air is helping things out, ultimately you need to get the water to sink down to the lowest point and then drip off. If you hang them high from one end, let's say the chest buckles, the moisture in the top half of the blanket has to travel 84" down to the tail flap before it can drip off or eventually evaporate. The top end will dry quickly but the butt end stays soggy a lot longer. By draping them over these racks, essentially in the same position they'd be on the horse, the water only has to travel about 25-30" down to the nearest "hemline" and then drip off.
    Honestly, I've dried turnouts and Baker blankets in about four hours using the method described above - after machine washing them - so they were totally soaked through.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    3,854

    Default

    I just drape mine over an unused wine rack in the basement. And having the de-humidifier definitely helps.

    But since I'm OCD about washing sheets and blankets, each of mine has 2 med weight, and 2 turnout sheets. DH gets pretty fed up with my obsessive blanket washing by around this time of year.

    Mine are out naked today - temps in the 60's, but we're supposed to have thunderstorms this afternoon, so it will be a fin time getting the mud off them tonight before sheets have to go back on. They have free access to shelter, but I doubt they'll use it.
    Lowly Farm Hand with Delusions of Barn Biddieom.
    Witherun Farm
    http://witherun-farm.blogspot.com/



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2002
    Posts
    2,351

    Default

    In case anyone is looking for a fancy solution, these look great: http://www.horserugdriers.co.uk/
    ............................................
    http://www.xanthoria.com/OTTB
    ............................................


    2 members found this post helpful.

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