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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,225

    Default What's the trick to getting blankets off without shocking the poor horse?

    In this dry, cold air, when I take blankets off, the horses are getting a few static shocks that make them jumpy and quite indignant. I keep trying to remember my 8th grade science class to figure out if there's a way I can do it that doesn't cause a shock. One way that definitely does NOT work is if I have one hand pulling the blanket and the other hand on the horse-- when I do that, my (non blanket) hand is like a taser, even through leather gloves.
    Best I can come up with is to fold the blanket back off of them as much as possible, so it's not one big static-producing slide. But even then, they're getting little zaps. The older guys are stoic about it, but poor little sensitive Scarlett, you'd think I was hitting her with a cattle prod.

    Anyone have a magic method? Maybe I should spray the blankets with static guard.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2012
    Location
    La La Land
    Posts
    478

    Default

    Ah winter static cling, gotta love it. I dont know if it will help or if it is even feasable for you, but I have noticed show sheen cuts down on static cling. I came to this discovery durring shedding season. I have some really wooly ones. You stand there brushing, curry combing, etc and the hair flies all over and sticks to your face. And you cant brush it off cause of the static. So now I use lots-o-show sheen and find alot less static problems.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,331

    Default

    Hmm, I've really not had trouble with this. I undo the straps, the front, then fold the neck side back over the rump and lift it off. Maybe some static guard?
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,921

    Default

    I've been able to ground myself by holding something like a stall front with one hand and using the other hand to lift the blanket off. Seems to work. We don't often have enough dry weather around here to cause static, but when we do, I know it as the tails are all poofed out at the bottom...dead give away.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,367

    Default

    This. I grab something metal and take it myself.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2009
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    1,804

    Default

    You have to ground yourself. Just don't create a circuit with the horse at both ends by touching the horse with both hands. The shock goes up one hand and down the other, so touch wood with one hand, after you folded it all down, while taking it off with the other.
    Trainer's website - photos of my horse Airborne under About and Francesca Edwards also in media page 1

    http://www.patricianorciadressage.com/



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    2,180

    Default

    Agree with touching metal to discharge the shock.

    I fold the blanket in thirds and carefully lift it off the horses back, being careful not to touch the horse as I remove the blanket.

    Next, I touch metal stall bars or a metal gate. The shock doesn't hurt much at all if you use the back of your hand.

    This has worked every time the last two years I've been doing it.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,606

    Default

    I've heard that dryer sheets work. Get your hand under the blanket with a dryer sheet against the horse and roll it back while keeping the dryer sheet between the horse and the blanket.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,225

    Default

    good suggestions, thanks.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    4,340

    Default

    This is why I don't use Baker blankets....worst static ever, and I am short and busty so usually when I pull a baker off of a big horse I shock the horse and get zapped in the boobies.
    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
    Bernard M. Baruch


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
    Posts
    3,242

    Default

    Weirdly, I've never noticed a shock taking my horses blankets off. At least nothing note worthy. Horses have never given Any indication. I just grab the blanket and pull quickly.

    Although my horses know darn well to stand still while I'm working with them. A tiny shock should not make them move or freak out. I have a friends mare (aka spookiest/most sensitive horse alive) and she doesn't seem to mind her blanket being taken off.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2008
    Posts
    957

    Default

    I am glad to read this...have had the problem all week....thanks



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2012
    Posts
    518

    Default

    Static guard. Lay your blankets on the ground and spray the crap out of them (the inside of the blanket, not the outside.) Let them dry for 5 minutes and you'll be good to go, it totally eliminates the problem. I re-spray my blankets once a week with a quick spritz from the Static Guard can. It's in a blue can with an orange lid!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2002
    Location
    Arlington, VA US
    Posts
    1,348

    Default

    second Static Guard. If blanket is on horse, fold it over, spray, repeat other side. Worrks wonderfully
    Appy Trails,
    Kathy & Cadet
    member CDCTA www.cdcta.com, TROT www.trot-md.org & Free State Appaloosa Horse Club freestateaphc.org



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2008
    Posts
    270

    Default

    I use healthy hair care moisturizing spray... get a bigish bottle and mix it for a spray bottle.. lasts for a really long time, cuts down on the dandruff and no zaps.
    and it smells good.
    ....... pausing


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,422

    Default

    Have had this issue all winter with one particular horse and one particular blanket. Of course the horse in question is a sensitive mare type.

    What works for me:
    I undo all the straps and buckles then dip my hand in the water bucket and take a shallow handful fo water. I then put my hand under the blanket and rub my hand down the length of her back. I then fold the back third up over towards the front, front third over to the back and lift up as much as possible.

    Do not, incidentally, grab the halter by a metal ring. That really did not go well
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,613

    Default

    I keep Static Guard in my tack box in the winter. I put it on my brushes and sometimes even on my hands. For some reason I am a VERY static-ey person.

    Before I pet my cat I usually have to wet (or spit on - don't tell the cat!) my hands because I don't think she would appreciate the taste of Static Guard. And plus I'm sure it's not safe!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2010
    Location
    S. Calif.
    Posts
    681

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AliCat518 View Post
    Weirdly, I've never noticed a shock taking my horses blankets off. At least nothing note worthy. Horses have never given Any indication. I just grab the blanket and pull quickly.

    Although my horses know darn well to stand still while I'm working with them. A tiny shock should not make them move or freak out. I have a friends mare (aka spookiest/most sensitive horse alive) and she doesn't seem to mind her blanket being taken off.
    Lucky you that you are probably in an area that has a different type of weather or higher humidity than those that have this problem and yes, it can be a shock you definitely notice.

    FWIW, I've unintentionally shocked the heck out of my guys taking off their blankets and they too stand still due to their training.

    I now use the dryer sheets and/or ground myself first.

    We are located in the high desert so maybe that contributes to the static shock.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    243

    Default

    I also just rub a dryer sheet around under the side I am removing. Takes care of it easily.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,225

    Default

    ,,,plus they'll smell Meadow Fresh! Or, more accurately, Meadow Fresh + Eau de Furry Pelt
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion



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