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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2009
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    Montreal, Qc
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    2,920

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    Quote Originally Posted by reay6790 View Post
    You need to be consistently winning at 3' and be consistently schooling at 3'6'' before you try to move up. I did 3' for 3 years before I moved up...I even aged out in the process :/
    I disagree with the winning part.

    In the jumpers, the 1m class are filled with retired higher level horses and 1m packers that have BTDT millions of time and don't mind being rushed at fences like crazies.
    Last summer was my debut with my mare in the jumper, we had done the modified hunter/equitation classes (0.80-0.90m) the year before with...good clear rounds but no ribbons.

    We were around 40-60 in each classes. No way I could win without destroying all the good training I've put so far in her! My goal isn't to win at 1m, it is to win at 1.30m! So we took it 'slow' and managed to do clear rounds most everytime.

    I ended up doing 2 courses at 1.10m by the end of the season and my placing (12/40)was better than in the 1m (25/50).

    Next summer, I will do the meters again to start with but if everything goes as planned, I should be doing the 1.10m an end up in the 1.20m by the end of the season where my chances if winning are way greater than in the meter.

    I'm currently schooling up to 1.20m at home.

    My mare was a really unruly green 4yrs old when I started her. She is now 8 yrs old and doing pretty well! I've been riding for a long time but never really competed much, and never higher than 1.10m at shows.
    So, it took us 3years of showing to get from zero to 3'6".


    3 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,751

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    If you do not trust your trainer's training plan then why are you with this trainer?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct. 7, 2010
    Posts
    475

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    The answer of when you can move up is dependent on when you and your horse are able to put in consistent, good-quality trips at 3'. Whether or not you are winning is going to depend on how your horse stacks up against the competition so I wouldn't necessarily use winning as a gauge; but if your horse is consistently going in and doing his job in the show ring and you both feel comfortable at home at the new height, then move up. If you find that you move up and you have more to work on, then you can always back down until you are ready.

    It could be six months, a year, 2 years, or longer. It really depends on you, your horse, and your training program. It will take longer if you are both new to the height, and less time if one or both parties have experience at the new height. For example, if someone like PNWJumper was riding my horse, he'd probably be jumping 3'6" like it was nothing. Instead, he has me, who has limited show experience at 3' and even less experience jumping more than 3', bringing him up from the speed bump classes. We have at least this year at 3', before we consider moving up.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2001
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    12th floor of the Acme building in a city that knows how to keep it's secrets.
    Posts
    4,871

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    If both you and your horse are green, your trainer may just be pointing out that it's hard to say. I would think, however, that if you are doing well at 3' currently, you should be able to do the 3'3" next year and 3'6" the following. But horses, and riders! are unpredictable. Your steady eddie at 3' may need a bit more help at 3'6" and you might need more mileage before you can provide that help. OTOH, you both might be bored stiff by July and finish out the year at 3'3" then do 3'6" in the spring.

    I assume you do hunters. I think the winning consistently at 3' is a good goal before moving up. If you can't win at 3', it's extremely likely you won't win at 3'6".
    *****
    You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2006
    Posts
    3,704

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    Do most folks think if you don't win at 3' you won't win at 3'6"? This is an honest question. I know my horse jumps much better at 3'6" and higher than he does at heights lower than that. I do jumpers, but I think it can be true with hunters or eq horses as well. This may not be the OP's situation, but I would think there are some horses out there that just will not do as well in 3' yet do well as the jumps get bigger (with the correct ride).
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    833

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    I may be old school but I was taught to be confidently schooling 6" higher than what you show.
    I think 2 years is reasonable to move from 3' to 3'6. Like PNW said, there really isn't much difference unless you get your head stuck on the difference.

    Your horse sounds similiar to my 5y/o mare. As long as I ride her confidently and am ready for her 'moments' she will get over.
    I started her over fences last January of 2012, 'competed' in the cross rails at the beginning of the season and finished at 2'6 in August.
    Now, she is doing gym lines ending in 3'6 on occassion, but I prefer 2.9/3'.

    I will likely compete 2'9 this season and may throw in a few 3' divisions by mid to end of the season.
    If I were competing 3' this year, I would anticipate doing 3'3-3'6 by next season. Pending the horse is consistant including changes and distances and not straining to get the height.


    Keep in mind if you even get one butterfly coming up to a fence (height wise), when schooling you will get 10X that at shows. Always compete at a height you are confident at.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2008
    Location
    at work and the barn...middle of nowhere PA
    Posts
    247

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    Quote Originally Posted by ParadoxFarm View Post
    Do most folks think if you don't win at 3' you won't win at 3'6"? This is an honest question. I know my horse jumps much better at 3'6" and higher than he does at heights lower than that. I do jumpers, but I think it can be true with hunters or eq horses as well. This may not be the OP's situation, but I would think there are some horses out there that just will not do as well in 3' yet do well as the jumps get bigger (with the correct ride).
    I was thinking the same thing. My old guy was a very athletic jumper, but he was a little bit, um, opinionated. Dragged me around the 3' hunters and we didn't usually do very well. When he decided to be good, we got OK ribbons (not a great mover), but at the 3'6...he still dragged me around a bit, but was generally much better, and we ribboned better as a result. If we'd waited til we were winning consistently, I don't think we'd have ever made it. That said, he was a very bold, scopey horse who would jump anything from just about anywhere.

    And, to the poster who said higher jumps look scarier at shows- I'm completely the opposite! Im much more intimidated by jumps at home. When I get to shows, I just go on auto-pilot, lol. Except one year I did the adult jumper classic at Upperville and I really thought I was going to die. Scariest course/jumps I have ever jumped. It was also wicked hot, I think 1-2 horses got around. Seriously thought we were going to die in that course.
    Last edited by GrantanaKC; Jan. 28, 2013 at 12:07 PM. Reason: I forgot about Upperville the year I did the jumpers...



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2011
    Posts
    347

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    There is a lot at play and most of it depends on your riding ability, but even more on your horse's ability.

    Winning consistently in the 3' does not necessarily translate to winning in the 3'6or even a successful move up to the 3'6. I know tons of horses that are just better suited to the 3' and don't have the step or scope for the 3'6 and never will, especially in the hunters. Jumpers is a bit of a different story.

    Some horse and rider combinations might be ready to go from 3' to 3'6 in a year, some might never be ready to move up. 4 years is a long time if you are a capable rider and your horse has the step and willingness. You can't train a short stride out of a horse and if you push beyond his comfort level, the result is usually not pretty and the horse will either start rushing or stopping.

    Only you & your trainer know your particular circumstances.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2004
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    I am not at liberty to say
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    882

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    Quote Originally Posted by ParadoxFarm View Post
    Do most folks think if you don't win at 3' you won't win at 3'6"? This is an honest question. I know my horse jumps much better at 3'6" and higher than he does at heights lower than that. I do jumpers, but I think it can be true with hunters or eq horses as well. This may not be the OP's situation, but I would think there are some horses out there that just will not do as well in 3' yet do well as the jumps get bigger (with the correct ride).
    Hey mine did too. 3' was when he just started actually jumping, and there were days where I can remember him literally running through gymnastics because he had no respect for the jump; 3'6'' was when he actually respected the fences enough to listen to me. However, if you can't find 8 respectable distances at a show, and--more importantly--the horse doesn't know when to be honest and when to save itself, then that horse needs to tough out long enough to learn the rules before moving up. You don't need to drill it into them (that's how you sour a talented horse), but there should be some consistency and safety in performance. I hate to say, "Use your best judgement" since really, it takes time and screwing up a lot to actually use your best judgement, but yeah. Using your best judgement and relying on a knowledgeable trainer/horse person is your best bet.



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