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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
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    Calera, AL
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    Default Anyone know what kind of plant this is?

    I think it's the origin of the vines all over my property:

    http://s27.beta.photobucket.com/user...cae52.jpg.html

    I hope this works. Photobucket is giving me fits tonight.

    BTW, I want to kill this vine plant, I swear it makes Tarzan proof vines. Horrid things...



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
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    7,847

    Default

    Although I can't help you, here are a few sites that might be able to:

    http://www.invasive.org/eastern/
    http://www.cas.vanderbilt.edu/bioima...ive-plants.htm

    Good luck!
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

    http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2011
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    1,313

    Default

    Do you have a rash? I looks very similar to poision sumac, but I think poison sumac is bushy, not viney. Roundup is a good herbicide.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    30,669

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Judysmom View Post
    Do you have a rash? I looks very similar to poision sumac, but I think poison sumac is bushy, not viney. Roundup is a good herbicide.
    eh, Roundup probably don't touch vines.

    take the samples to the county extension!

    then it it with brush be gone or something like that!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
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    1,469

    Default

    thorny olive?



  6. #6
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

    Default

    Yup - looks like Thorny Olive to me as well.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2011
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    153

    Default

    From your photo it's a little hard to see if the leaf margins are smooth or finely serrated. I'm also looking at the fruit. Does it have small white flowers?

    There are a number of characteristics that lead me to say hardy kiwifruit. It is becoming an invasive in parts of New England. Given your location it may find the milder growing region even more hospitable. Google "is actinidia an invasive species" you'll find a number of sites with photos. There are several species and numerous varieties of this plant so the photos may vary. This site has a number of photos you might want to look at. Good luck.

    http://www.vtinvasives.org/sites/def...a_arguta_1.pdf

    If it is hardy kiwifruit there are gardeners way up north who will envy you. The fruit is edible and for the cultivated varieties quite tasty. You may want to reconsider your relationship with it before you take drastic measures.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2011
    Posts
    153

    Default

    Doubt thorny olive - it's a shrub. OP asked about a vine.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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    Default

    We don't have that here, but I'd try Arsenal first. If that doesn't kill it, Tordon K. You have to have a license to spray Tordon K on other peoples property. If you are lucky and talk like you know what you are talking about, you may be able to find someone to sell it to you for use on your own property.

    http://www.rrsi.com/docs/dupont_bc_kt.pdf



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    9,917

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    Tom how do those two compare to Roundup? I don't spray much at all but there is the occasional plant that really needs to go.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
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    8,110

    Default

    When I moved on my previous property they had fenced the part by the house, and I kept the dog there with his doggy door, of course. The outer 2/3 was trees (diseased ones that went one by one over the years) and masses of junk, and wild raspberries. I found out to get rid of something like that, that's invasive, you have to cut very short, maybe using a small chain saw or a tree trimmer on a pole, cut about 3 or 4 inches above the ground, clearing everything else to the bare soil. Then dig up the roots. Plants that are very invasive are tough to get rid of even using this method.

    There are sprays like (not sure of the name) Triox, but it kills all plants for a lot of years apparently. With the wild raspberry vines I just cut them off short, using really thick leather gloves pulled and yanked the vine growth and traced it back to the ground sprouting site. Then the real fun started. I had to dig the root up, and they spread underground, so I had to dig the root ball (it looks like onion tubers underground), then follow the roots to the next root ball it spread from. It took at least five years to get rid of all of the sprouts, and I still occasionally had sprouts, and I dug a big ball of earth up (at least basketball size), seperated all of the plant roots, and tubers out, and put the rest of the dirt back. I finally got rid of all of them, but it really took a lot of effort. I found Roundup and other regular sprays totally ineffective to get rid of anything but a few leaves, so the Coop or other farm store is the place to go, or go to the big box store and talk to the weed killing expert (they really do have one, and they're great), and take a sample of the plant with you. Make sure you tell them if you're going to replant immediately, so they know what to prescribe.

    With mine I could simply rake them up, cut the bottom of the vine off, haul to the curb, and the city trash took them. But if they're more scrub-like, then you might have to yank them out of the ground with a truck or tractor and chain, after you untangle and cut off the vines that are on trees or spread a lot. Then you go after the roots, and you'll have to keep your eye on the area to get them as they sprout, and then they're manageable enough to dig up with a shovel.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
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    4,039

    Default

    I would attempt to make it grew, everything that I have wanted to grow has died ... I guess others have been successful in actually growing stuff, I never have.

    21-0-0 fertilizer should stress the vine's root system to point of failure


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
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    Calera, AL
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    Default

    Thanks for all your replies! I'll give just a little more info...

    I'm not *completely* sure that this plant is what is making my woods a viney hell; however, it did have little viney looking out-reachers when I cut it down. Something is making really big vines that go way up into the trees. I'll take pictures later today.

    I did some looking around - googled thorny olive and "is actinidia an invasive species" Have to say that the later seems to have fatter leaves than the one I have. Also, some sites say that thorny olive can be in shrub or vine form depending on the conditions. The pics of the thorny olive look more like the thing I have.

    All that said, the actual vines that go up into the trees don't have leaves on them. They really look like very thick (1" thick) hard ropes. I've never seen anything like them except on old tarzan movies.

    And Judysmom, I don't have a rash - yet! Yesterday was the first day I touched that thing. Hopefully, I'd have a rash by now if I was going to get one. I did have on gloves, though. I need to ask the SO - he wasn't wearing gloves.

    When I first moved here I had HUGE poison ivy plants and the feed store sold me something that was for more stem-my plants since they said Roundup wouldn't really kill the big stuff. I'd love to say what it is but the label fell off and I can't remember the name. It kills stuff, though!

    They told me that I could let the horses on it after it dried but when I researched it (after buying) I found that the horses should be off of the area for 30+ days. I've never used it on horse areas because of that - just other areas. I'm thinking that if I just pour some on the root of this thing, I'll be safe??? There is no grass at all around. It's all woods and a floor of leaves. Opinions???



  14. #14
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    Sep. 24, 2004
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    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
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    2,159

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    Round-up is great stuff. For woody plants & trees, I cut then, paint the stump with full strength RU. Large diameter tree stumps are fringed. One important point... The plant has to be actively growing for RU to translocate to the roots... Thus no winter or drought times.



  15. #15
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    Default

    Interesting. Maybe they just wanted to sell this other stuff or were just inept. So, working on stumps (albeit, smaller than 2" of stump) won't really work in the winter if I want to kill them?



  16. #16
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    Sep. 24, 2004
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    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
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    Quote Originally Posted by alabama View Post
    Interesting. Maybe they just wanted to sell this other stuff or were just inept. So, working on stumps (albeit, smaller than 2" of stump) won't really work in the winter if I want to kill them?
    No .. Come Spring, you'll see all sorts of shoots from the stump. You could then cut the shoots and paint the shoot stubs. But it's more work and I'm lazy.

    In defense of your supplier... maybe they were thinking of you spraying the weeds. Then RU may not work as well.

    Used as I described, RU or generic glysophate is safe, effective and cheap. Action in the phloem is way more effective than leaf uptake.



  17. #17
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    Nov. 6, 2002
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    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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    Quote Originally Posted by grayarabpony View Post
    Tom how do those two compare to Roundup? I don't spray much at all but there is the occasional plant that really needs to go.
    Not really a comparison. These are heavy duty, last resort things. I feel surely that they are not as kind to the environment as Roundup. Arsenal is the only thing I've found to permanently kill Sweet Gum. If it absolutely, positively has to be killed and I know Roundup won't do it, Arsenal is my first try, and if it's going to kill it, you only have to hit something once with it.

    The only thing I've seen that Arsenal won't kill, is a pine tree, and kudzu. In fact, Arsenal is used in pine stands to kill off sweet gums and other hardwoods. It's commonly sold under the trade name Powerline, because that's what they use under powerlines to kill off brush. Do a search on ebay for "arsenal powerline". It's not cheap, but a little goes a long way.

    It's not something you want to spray around anywhere like Roundup, but it doesn't take much to kill something. I've found it best to use it in the Fall when the sap starts going down-when Poplar trees first start to turn yellow is my indicator. I've found it will kill Wisteria. I use it for spot spraying only. Hit the leaves of a Sweet Gum at the right time in the fall, and it won't come back. For a big one, hack into the bark and spray into the cut.

    Tordon K will even kill Kudzu, but it's hard to get without a license.

    My answer for stumps is an excavator, and burning pile. Arsenal will kiill stumps though.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Imazapyr-2SL...item5d33905ed7



  18. #18
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    Aug. 12, 2002
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    Calera, AL
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    Quote Originally Posted by hosspuller View Post
    No .. Come Spring, you'll see all sorts of shoots from the stump. You could then cut the shoots and paint the shoot stubs. But it's more work and I'm lazy.

    In defense of your supplier... maybe they were thinking of you spraying the weeds. Then RU may not work as well.

    Used as I described, RU or generic glysophate is safe, effective and cheap. Action in the phloem is way more effective than leaf uptake.
    All good to know. I'll wait 'til spring so I won't have to do it twice. I'll either pick up some RU or use whatever it is that I have that the feed store sold me (it really does work but I don't want to spray it - just paint the stumps). RU is probably safer, though.

    I'm actually cutting down a ton of itty bitty trees in the woods. I figured they'd try to regrow this spring. So I figured I'd be wandering around with loppers and RU/whatever in the spring anyway.

    The very hated poison ivy is all gone. Horses either ate it or stomped it to death as the trampled through the woods. Horses don't eat poison ivy, do they? I figure they just killed it by stomping around on it. The woods are much less dense now than they were when I moved in. The horses really like hanging in the woods.



  19. #19
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    Sep. 24, 2004
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    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
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    A few tips:

    A helper is very valued. It's a lot easier for one person to cut and a second person with a paint brush to touch the stumps. You don't have to keep switching tools and remembering where you laid the last tool down (I've spent much time looking for either the cutter or the paint brush lol )

    Wait for the plant to sprout. Example ... Before the asparagus sprouts emerge, I spray the asparagus patch in the spring with RU. This kills all the grass & weeds yet leaves the asparagus untouched.



  20. #20
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    Aug. 12, 2002
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    Calera, AL
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    Thanks! I'll enlist my SO for this. For a city boy, he is surprisingly happy to help around the farm.

    And dammit, I forgot to take pics of the vines today. I got hung up with spearing another round bale and just flat forgot.



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