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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2012
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    Montana
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    2,672

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    Ugh, what a crappy thing to be dealing with! I guess the only real way you'd have any insight and ability to do anything about the other horses is if you stayed. You could tell the BO that you will take care of coordinating water/chores etc for X reduction in your board, with another boarder as your backup (so you can train and make sure others are on the same page), because you know she is as concerned as you are about all the risks of horses not having water! Of course,if she says anything other than "great idea" or in any way starts defending the lazy idiot, i'd probably not argue with her but just move, and make absolutely certain the ohter boarders and other horsey people in the area heard all about it

    If takign on that kind of care really isn't feasible for you (don't know distances involved, your work sitution, whatever), then, for sure, move. And contact the other boarders as you have, inform them they have to really check on their horses, get one of them to volunteer for the "water coordinator position" and so on.

    you could contact AC but when they come to check, I bet the horses will look fine and watered. But you could make sure the boarders there know how to contact AC and agree to do so if anything happens in the future!



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
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    11,372

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    Quote Originally Posted by gumtree View Post
    Water at all times IMO is part of basic care and is provided and looked after by the BO as part of full board. Regardless the time of the year. Curious, if you don’t mind me asking, how much do you pay for board? I have found you kind of get what you pay for. Personally I would never board at a place that did not have a resident, knowledgeable person living on the property within ear shot of the horses, barn and paddocks/pastures.
    BO is retired and does live on site within about 100 feet of where the horses are. But...she's a busy lady with her volunteer work, vacations, etc. I don't think she really "knows" the horses that well. Heck, she keeps calling my mare "He". "He is so cute!" "He is so friendly." Uh huh. She's not cute and she's not friendly. And she's not a HE.

    Anyway, as far as price, I totally hear you. However, when I think of pricing, I think that the basics are part of the deal at any price range. I've boarded enough to know that everyone has different standards and I knew when I moved here that this was a pretty basic place. But no matter what you're paying, if someone is hanging a shingle saying they're a full board facility, water is assumed to be included. Further, her OWN horse is in this herd. So you'd THINK she'd be LIVID.

    FWIW, I'm going to be paying the same amount at the new place and it's a much nicer facility. But it's not really a boarding barn. It's a fellow COTHer who occasionally takes in a boarder when it's a good fit. Better pasture, better barn, better care, has an outdoor, no mud even when we've had the most muddy weather ever....AND, my mare will get some extra work as she's going to do some up downer lessons which helps me out in more ways than one. Since my mare is an easy keeper and doesn't require anything special, what I'm most interested in is having someone there whose judgment I can trust. Over the last few weeks of communication, visit, etc, I am confident that my mare will be very well looked after. Now it's just a matter of getting her there. My landlady has offered to haul as has the new BO. We're just working out the schedule.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    I know you don't want to hear it:
    But when you load up you horse and move, do not go back.

    While I do understand your reasoning, you open yourself up to all kinds of problems and it won't solve the situation anyhow.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
    Posts
    1,019

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    Have you not actually confronted this helper? That would be job 1 for me. "Every time I'm here the tank is empty. I've spoken with BO and I understand there was a hole in that tank. You replaced it with a tank that doesn't hold enough water. They need a different tank. I will be here every day checking until it is done."



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    I know you don't want to hear it:
    But when you load up you horse and move, do not go back.

    While I do understand your reasoning, you open yourself up to all kinds of problems and it won't solve the situation anyhow.
    You really think so? What if I can't get a hold of BO to let her know I won't be going out? I'm so worried that horses are going to get dehydrated and colic. Since I KNOW about it, I feel like I'm sort of responsible for it. Once you know, you know....ya know?

    It's not that I don't want to hear it per se. Going to both farms will mean that I'm gone for a huge chunk of the day which means I'll be cleaning up messes at home due to my dog being on a trial run of steroids and needing to urinate frequently. I don't want to be gone at all right now. But I can't leave Miss Mare in this situation. And I feel badly for the rest.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #46
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    Nov. 30, 2006
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    Inform as many of the other boarders as you can. Then, move on.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #47
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by gumshoe View Post
    Have you not actually confronted this helper? That would be job 1 for me. "Every time I'm here the tank is empty. I've spoken with BO and I understand there was a hole in that tank. You replaced it with a tank that doesn't hold enough water. They need a different tank. I will be here every day checking until it is done."
    I have discussed concerns with her in the past at BO's suggestion. However, I have not this time because I do not feel that it's my responsibility to manage her. Her responsibilities are between her and the BO and she's being paid for them. BO's responsibility is to me and my horse. BO is where the buck should stop. I am worried about the helper retaliating against my horse before I can get out of there. I don't have much time or patience for a liar who is taking shortcuts and am not sure I could be as civil as I should be.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,492

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    Agree that another boarder who is actually boarding there HAS to pick up the slack. Pick one or two that seem responsible / are there frequently and just lay it on the line very clearly that the horses' health is at serious risk and it simply has to be done. And then leave.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
    Location
    Catharpin, Virginia
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    My question is why would the BO keep this person on after multiple and consistent offenses regarding water.

    I would have let them go a long time ago and found someone who could do their job regarding the very basic of horse care/health.

    It sounds like the helper is in control here.



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    Another vote that once you remove your horse it is probably best that you do not keep going back.
    I can totally see slacker barn worker blaming you for things that are wrong that occur after you leave.
    Find another boarder and inform them or simply tell the BO that you are leaving and you will not be checking.



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRoo View Post
    You really think so? What if I can't get a hold of BO to let her know I won't be going out? I'm so worried that horses are going to get dehydrated and colic. Since I KNOW about it, I feel like I'm sort of responsible for it. Once you know, you know....ya know?

    It's not that I don't want to hear it per se. Going to both farms will mean that I'm gone for a huge chunk of the day which means I'll be cleaning up messes at home due to my dog being on a trial run of steroids and needing to urinate frequently. I don't want to be gone at all right now. But I can't leave Miss Mare in this situation. And I feel badly for the rest.
    Yes. I mean it.
    You can't fix the situation. The BO knows, has known. And it continues.

    You, as business woman should know that TIME is the most valuable thing you have. You cannot get it back. And you are willing to waste yours on people who clearly don't give a crap.
    You would spend your money doing a job that isn't yours to do. Time=$$ plus the gas you would be spending. I do recall your discretionary funds are on the lower end compared to what they used to be.
    You assume worries that you don't need to burden yourself with.
    Remember the serenity prayer: give me the serenity to accept the things I can't change, the courage to change the things I can and the wisdom to know the difference.

    You tried, nothing changed, time to move on and not look back.
    It's between the BO, the helper and the owners.

    Bless you for caring. But it's like that pathetic puppy at trade day or in the petshop: Keep walking. Any type of rescue only enables (can you tell, when I say don't enable...)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
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    My version of the serenity prayer involves bodies...and disposing of them. LOL

    But you're right. I have less funds to deal with now that I'm not working. I have time, but it comes at a cost too, and ultimately, my responsibility is to my horse. and the other critters in my charge. If I can't take care of them well as a result, I have no business trying to take care of others at their expense.

    I get the feeling after the trailer issue, the stalling issue, the loose horse issues, and now the water issue that BO is way more fast and loose with things than I realized initially. And that some horses survive it and as a result, reinforce the idea that piss poor care is good care.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #53
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    don't forget the special guardian that watches over fools....

    You can spend your spare time much more productive elsewhere.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
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    1,684

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    What a terrible situation! Obviously you have to get your own horse out of there as soon as possible, as you've planned. As Alagirl has said, you put yourself at some risk if you go back after you've moved your horse. If you had any sort of conflict with the "helper" and the police came, you'd have no legitimate reason to be there. You could return if you were with another boarder, or perhaps if you were there at their request.
    If I were you, I would send the BO something in writing, with copies of the pictures you took, reminding her that you've notified her repeatedly that the animals in her care were without water.
    And then I would notify animal control. They may do nothing, they may follow up and check the water, it's unlikely that there would be any punishment. But this owner doesn't have the right to collect money from boarders and ignore problems just because she likes to travel.
    If you have contact information for any of the other boarders, I would also notify them, maybe by copying them on your letter to the B. O., complete with pictures.
    It's certainly a terrible situation to be in. I understand your desire to check on all of the remaining horses; no one wants to be the person who did nothing while a horse died!
    One last thought....if you're not working now, and you're out there anyway, and the current "helper" is useless, would the BO hire you instead?



  15. #55
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
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    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hinderella View Post
    One last thought....if you're not working now, and you're out there anyway, and the current "helper" is useless, would the BO hire you instead?
    That really wouldn't be practical. She lives nowhere near the barn, has one car to use between her and her husband, and she has a sick dog to look after. The only solution here is to bug out ASAP, smoothly and by the numbers. This is not the kind of situation that can be fixed without a complete 180 degree solution and the BO is part of the problem.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  16. #56
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2000
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    Chesterland, OH USA
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    On my way out, I would give the other boarders a heads up and also let the slacker help know that everyone has been informed.
    Maybe knowing that people know she is slacking will help motivate her.

    Otherwise, this is one of the toughest parts of horse ownership I deal with, remembering that these are not my horses.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2009
    Location
    The Armpit of BC
    Posts
    154

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    Buddy - God bless you for your very kind heart in your worry for the horses left behind.

    As a parting message (after Miss Mare has been moved,) convey to the BO that should any of the other horses fall ill and/or die due to a vet's determination that they were deprived of water, you will provided the owners of said horses the evidence you have that the BO was notified many times that the horses were denied water, a necessity of life. If the owners wish to take legal action against her, including paying vet bills resulting from her negligence then they are welcome to your evidence.

    Sorry, I have not worded this as well as I would like. I have to leave momentarily to work at a barn. Nice place too; they insist on giving water to their horses. What a concept, eh?

    Good luck in all that you do, BR. You have done all that is humanly possible to protect the horses left behind. Now look after you and yours; really that's all that is left to do.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #58
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 1999
    Location
    Midland, NC, USA
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    7,249

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    I would wait until she was out of town, call and tell her the horses were out of water and HER horse was acting colicky (most horses paw and lay down at some point during the day, right?). Hit the panic button and see if a vet bill will smarten her up.

    But then, I can be a b**ch when people are so stupid they deserve it.

    Jennifer


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

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    Well, I worked it out and I told her.

    And she continues to defend her worker/boarder.

    Screw 'em.

    I'm outtie.

    She LITERALLY just hung up on me to go on a RIDE at Disney. For Effs Sake.

    Breathing. breathing.

    Done.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  20. #60
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
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    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
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    11,455

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    Wow. What a poo head.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!


    2 members found this post helpful.

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