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  1. #41
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    Would horsevore apply here?
    I think it would be "equivore."
    “Oh, you hate your job? Why didn't you say so? There's a support group for that. It's called EVERYBODY, and they meet at the bar.”
    Drew Carey



  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat9 View Post
    I think it would be "equivore."
    That would be more all encompassing then, mules, donkeys, eohippus and all such included.


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  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    You sound there like you know about how to raise cattle and what makes them happy as much as those very nice people that toured this fancy BNT stables and coming out were commenting, concerned, "such pretty horses, but why do they keep them in jail, behind bars?"
    It's about what the stress of being on that diet does to their insides and the meds they must be on to keep them up during the last while. Then we slaughter them and consume it. Yeah, there's varying degrees of it in the meat production industry but industry demands the most rapid and efficient means to the end...raising something on grass doesn't satisfy that particular requirement.

    We will have to agree to disagree. We raise a lot of our food and try to keep everything we eat local for a variety of reasons...not very easy but we good about supporting local farmers. It's just how we feel about it. I don't care what other folks do.

    As far as what keeps cattle happy...IDK. I just know what type of situation rears a healthy animal whose meat I would feel most comfortable consuming. If you or anyone else has no issue eating feed lot, fattened on grain beef or whatever, knock yourself out. Each to his/her own.

    Since I consider most folks who would make that comment about show horses to be fairly ignorant, I guess I'll just go ahead and assume (however dangerously) that you might have just saved the words you wrote and just said it outright.

    Good grief.



  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    That would be more all encompassing then, mules, donkeys, eohippus and all such included.
    But also rhinos and tapirs, all of them being members of the Equidae (a family in taxonomic ordering schemes).
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finzean View Post
    It's about what the stress of being on that diet does to their insides and the meds they must be on to keep them up during the last while. Then we slaughter them and consume it. Yeah, there's varying degrees of it in the meat production industry but industry demands the most rapid and efficient means to the end...raising something on grass doesn't satisfy that particular requirement.

    We will have to agree to disagree. We raise a lot of our food and try to keep everything we eat local for a variety of reasons...not very easy but we good about supporting local farmers. It's just how we feel about it. I don't care what other folks do.

    As far as what keeps cattle happy...IDK. I just know what type of situation rears a healthy animal whose meat I would feel most comfortable consuming. If you or anyone else has no issue eating feed lot, fattened on grain beef or whatever, knock yourself out. Each to his/her own.

    Since I consider most folks who would make that comment about show horses to be fairly ignorant, I guess I'll just go ahead and assume (however dangerously) that you might have just saved the words you wrote and just said it outright.

    Good grief.
    Where did you get that information about how cattle are raised?
    Because you are way off the mark there.
    In a few words, "it ain't so".



  6. #46
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    From a variety of sources on both sides of the fence; studies and research read with high scrutiny. MSU; Beef Extension; Cattleman's Association; various papers generated by universities, researchers for drug companies, etc. I must admit that I haven't read anything/watched anything generated by the PETA type folks.

    Again, we agree to disagree. Just because someone doesn't agree with your perspective doesn't mean their own doesn't have value. And just because someone else's opinions don't match your own doesn't mean theirs are completely unfounded...generated from the land of unicorns and rainbows.

    FWIW - some of the info I get about how cattle are raised has to do with how we raise the few we keep, how several of my family members raise theirs (with a few of them doing it for production meat & one breeding/showing). We don't all do it the same way.


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  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finzean View Post
    From a variety of sources on both sides of the fence; studies and research read with high scrutiny. MSU; Beef Extension; Cattleman's Association; various papers generated by universities, researchers for drug companies, etc. I must admit that I haven't read anything/watched anything generated by the PETA type folks.

    Again, we agree to disagree. Just because someone doesn't agree with your perspective doesn't mean their own doesn't have value. And just because someone else's opinions don't match your own doesn't mean theirs are completely unfounded...generated from the land of unicorns and rainbows.

    FWIW - some of the info I get about how cattle are raised has to do with how we raise the few we keep, how several of my family members raise theirs (with a few of them doing it for production meat & one breeding/showing). We don't all do it the same way.
    You are right, "we don't all do it the same way".
    That doesn't mean that, just because some do things differently than you think, they are automatically wrong.

    In other words, you don't need to think what others do is wrong to feel good about what you do, especially when you are going by myths and misinformation.

    Be happy to do what you choose to do, learn more about why others do what they do and what in both, what you do and what others do is best, for their situation.


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  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    That would be more all encompassing then, mules, donkeys, eohippus and all such included.
    I'm pretty sure you can only get eohippus frozen.....


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  9. #49
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    Or maybe even petrified?


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  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Or maybe even petrified?
    That would depend on who was chasing who!



  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Carcasses are aged by USDA inspectors for age above 30 months old by the maturity of the cartilage between ribs, in the intercostal spaces.
    There are no teeth to evaluate in hanging carcasses.
    There is much an inspector inspects in the carcass, before it gets stamped.
    WEll the slaughterhouse told me that the inspector checks the teeth of the cattle that are processed to age them. Perhaps in these small plants they do as they only process 20 or so a day..I don't know...just repeating what they told me.

    My other point was that the USDA only does a visual inspection and there is no guarantee of "wholesomeness" or safety. In fact, if you do get sick from USDA inspected meat, you can't sue them for poor inspection or a mistake.



  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finzean View Post
    I'm more referring to the way in which cattle are kept in feed lots, stressed and crammed full of grain living a digestive life for which they are not designed. I've personally been to feed lots and first hand observed the "life" these poor animals endure until they are slaughtered.
    The connection between all that and the carcinogens you allude to with your McCancer burger comment escapes me.

    Hyperbole much?



  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat9 View Post
    I think it would be "equivore."
    Hippophagism, hippophagy.



  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by alibi_18 View Post
    Hippophagism, hippophagy.
    I guess eating cattle then would be taurophagy?



  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    WEll the slaughterhouse told me that the inspector checks the teeth of the cattle that are processed to age them. Perhaps in these small plants they do as they only process 20 or so a day..I don't know...just repeating what they told me.

    My other point was that the USDA only does a visual inspection and there is no guarantee of "wholesomeness" or safety. In fact, if you do get sick from USDA inspected meat, you can't sue them for poor inspection or a mistake.
    Well, I check teeth when we buy a load of cows, but they still have their heads on then.

    It is interesting that in your plant they age them before slaughter.
    If that is what they told you, then their inspectors do things differently than here, which doesn't mean it is wrong or right, just different.

    I understood the local plants inspectors to say that it was standard to check hanging carcasses for maturity as I described.
    I should not have assumed that standard means in all places they inspect and that is the only way they may do it.

    For the kind of possible contamination that may make someone sick, plants here have labs that run samples all day long.
    That is how they catch the occasional contaminated lot they then condemn and if it has already been sent to retailers, recall it.



  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by caballero View Post
    The connection between all that and the carcinogens you allude to with your McCancer burger comment escapes me.

    Hyperbole much?
    That grain fed bashing is like saying all saddlebred horses are sored, all race horses doped, all equitation horses tranquilized, etc.

    Someone somewhere read that on the internet, so it has to be true and if they saw it once with their own eyes, well, double true then.

    Must be nice to live in such a black and white, simple world, with everything in it nicely pigeonholed with superficial, very fuzzy understanding, don't confuse me with information, let me keep on believing whatever myths are floating around.

    Back to whoever wanted to eat horse meat, I hope he got his wish and saw how much better most any other meat out there really is, if all he wanted is a good eating experience as a carnivore.



  17. #57
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    There's actually another very important reason why grass-fed beef is much to be preferred over the feedlot variety. The meat of grass-fed animals has a far higher amount of Omega-3 fatty acids than grain-fed. Grain-fed animals wind up being very heavy on the Omega-6 end, which combined with all the other excess of Omega-6 humans now eat could have implications for diseases like cancer, developmental disabilities, Alzheimer's, etc. right there.

    Because of the grain products we eat ourselves which now form the bulk of many people's diet (none of which we evolved to eat as agriculture is only 12,000 years old!) plus the heavily Omega-6 laden meat, our bodies are completely out of whack all the time. It's rather telling that prior to 1920 the modern "Western diseases" were rarely seen in the population by physicians. When did refined grains and feedlots show up? Oh, yeah . . .

    Then there's the entire issue of the hormone plugs behind each and every feedlot cow's ear to speed their growth and maturity.
    Everyone who's walking, running, riding or swimming backstroke for "The Cure" might want to take a look at THAT!

    Don't count on the USDA or the FDA to protect you from ANYthing. Take a look at who funds them an 'nuff said.



  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
    There's actually another very important reason why grass-fed beef is much to be preferred over the feedlot variety. The meat of grass-fed animals has a far higher amount of Omega-3 fatty acids than grain-fed. Grain-fed animals wind up being very heavy on the Omega-6 end, which combined with all the other excess of Omega-6 humans now eat could have implications for diseases like cancer, developmental disabilities, Alzheimer's, etc. right there.

    Because of the grain products we eat ourselves which now form the bulk of many people's diet (none of which we evolved to eat as agriculture is only 12,000 years old!) plus the heavily Omega-6 laden meat, our bodies are completely out of whack all the time. It's rather telling that prior to 1920 the modern "Western diseases" were rarely seen in the population by physicians. When did refined grains and feedlots show up? Oh, yeah . . .

    Then there's the entire issue of the hormone plugs behind each and every feedlot cow's ear to speed their growth and maturity.
    Everyone who's walking, running, riding or swimming backstroke for "The Cure" might want to take a look at THAT!

    Don't count on the USDA or the FDA to protect you from ANYthing. Take a look at who funds them an 'nuff said.
    Not quite right.
    You would have to eat something like ten lbs of beef a day for that bit of difference in fats to be nutritionally significant.

    The rest, well, more myths bandied around by a media intent in bashing beef, especially grain fed, especially since media big names were misled by anti grain fed beef agendas and stepped in "it" and were called out by the grain fed beef producers and made look like the fools they are.

    Right, never make the media mad, they will hound you forever, forget journalistic standards.

    Psst, there are more "hormones" in the tofu you eat in one meal than in any beef you may eat in one meal, by thousands times more.
    Get the facts right.


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  19. #59
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    Tofu, and any other soy products NOT produced by the fermentation process used in traditional cultures (think miso, soy sauce) is pretty close to toxic and should be eaten by NO ONE. Particularly women worried about endocrine disruptors, since it is loaded with phyto-estrogens. BTW, want your perimenopause symptoms to go nuts? Try eating THAT every day!

    I swallowed the "health" advice for a couple of years and was a blimp who felt like sh*t and exercised until I was 3-legged lame without losing a pound. Nearly veggie, eating soy as a meat substitute, I caught every crud that came by and that "whole grain" they push so hard had me feeling like the Hindenburg half the time.

    Some recent "foodie" books turned me 100% around to the Paleo point of view. Tried it as my own experiment and had my mind blown. It eliminated every single problem I had including the extra 25 lbs. while giving up the running which I hated. So you'll never catch me arguing for "meat substitutes!" Bring on your venison, elk, & lamb, your grass-fed beef and free-range pork. I'll eat it all!



  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
    Tofu, and any other soy products NOT produced by the fermentation process used in traditional cultures (think miso, soy sauce) is pretty close to toxic and should be eaten by NO ONE. Particularly women worried about endocrine disruptors, since it is loaded with phyto-estrogens. BTW, want your perimenopause symptoms to go nuts? Try eating THAT every day!

    I swallowed the "health" advice for a couple of years and was a blimp who felt like sh*t and exercised until I was 3-legged lame without losing a pound. Nearly veggie, eating soy as a meat substitute, I caught every crud that came by and that "whole grain" they push so hard had me feeling like the Hindenburg half the time.

    Some recent "foodie" books turned me 100% around to the Paleo point of view. Tried it as my own experiment and had my mind blown. It eliminated every single problem I had including the extra 25 lbs. while giving up the running which I hated. So you'll never catch me arguing for "meat substitutes!" Bring on your venison, elk, & lamb, your grass-fed beef and free-range pork. I'll eat it all!
    ---"Fact:
    Hormones like estrogen are used in modern beef production to increase the amount of beef that can be harvested from cattle. However, these hormones are the same as, or synthetic versions of those naturally produced by cattle. The estrogen that is used in beef production, for example, is used at levels that are a fraction of what is found in soybean oil, soybeans, eggs and what is produced by the human body.

    Dig deeper...
    Consider that a pound of soybean oil contains 900,000 nanograms of estrogen per pound. Compare that to 1.9 nanograms per pound found in beef produced using hormone implants and 1.7 nanograms per pound in non-implanted beef "---



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