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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2012
    Location
    Louisa County, Virginia
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    269

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    I hope she will recover smoothly from the amputation and you will have some wonderful times together ahead. My first dog was a Rottie, Clara, the sweetest dog ever -- a leaner and a drooler!

    Jingles for her, you, and your horse, too.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2011
    Posts
    1,918

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    That's great to hear it's a back leg. I have never known many dogs in real life with amputations but have seen videos of them, and dogs are able to run and move much better with one back leg than one front leg. Like horses most of their weight I think is on the front legs, so when a front leg is removed they have to really hop in front. When a back leg is removed they can pretty much run like normal.
    I hope you dog and horse heal quickly and your dog stays healthy for as long as possible.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    923

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    Rottimom, sounds like a very reasonable decision.....back leg, fractured, clear chest rads, I would have done the exact same thing under those circumstances, as you say it was that or euthanize her, and I wouldn't have been ready to let her go yet either, with that scenario.

    Here's hoping you will have much more precious time with her, please keep us posted!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

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    I understand your decision, sometimes its just not the moment to let them go. I am glad the rads "made the decision" for you, so to speak. That is always the best.

    A little story to punctuate that point. When Baxter was five months old he mysteriously damaged his elbow and the initial rads showed a probable displaced fracture bed through the growth plate. NOT a good prognosis but we decided to take him to the orthopedic surgery center anyway and see what they had to say. Long story short, the second set of xrays showed NO fracture bed and no reason for the swelling and extreme pain he was in. He came home sedated and on pain meds. In a week it was as if whatever it was, had never happened.

    We almost euthanized him when we looked at the first rads. The fracture bed was so clear and the only question was, was it completely displaced, NOT was it fractured. My initial reaction and intuition - that it was not his day to die - saved his life - and some sort of divine intervention, because radiographs dont lie and artifacts arent that huge or clear.

    He is sitting next to me right now enjoy your girl, and best wishes to you both.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    18,949

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    Jingles for a quick and complete recovery, so glad the chest was clear.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,551

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    Just this morning I ran into a woman with her three-legged lab walking around a lake I go to. It is two miles around and the lab was DRAGGING her on the leash - he was practically running! He was missing a hind leg all the way up to the hip. I did notice that he was "thin" - that is, she obviously kept his weight as far down as she could to keep more stress off the other legs. You might check your guy's weight and see if you can bring it down a few pounds through diet or weight-control food. Good luck!
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2013
    Posts
    59

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    I was able to visit Molly today, what a shock! I did not believe she would already be standing up but the nurses said she has even been out to do her business outside! She looks very different, and is still hooked up to internal pain medications but she was very happy to see me. The vets said she is recovering as planned and as long as she doesnt take a turn for the worse she can come home tomorrow afternoon. Im a bit nervous bringing her home, but the nurses assured me she will do ok. I thnk this bothers ME more than it does HER! Im not sure what the other girls will think of her either!

    The vets did tell me she will need to loose some weight. I dont think she is fat, but they said leaner will be easier on her. Im glad to hear that a 3 leg dog can still drag an owner! I hope Molly is able to run around again soon!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    10,925

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    That is lovely news, OP.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2003
    Posts
    98

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    So glad that Molly is doing good. I'm sure this is harder on you than her. I've seen so many tri-pod dogs and once they get moving they never look back. Leaner is better.

    My best to you and Molly. I really hope you have lots more time together.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2008
    Posts
    646

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    Glad to hear she's doing well! :-)



  11. #31
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2001
    Posts
    2,333

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    So glad to hear Molly is doing well. I work in an veterinary oncology office and it's truly amazing how well these guys do when they don't hurt anymore. Molly will be dragging you around in no time! As far as chemotherapy, don't make it such a big decision (ie commitment to do a full course of chemotherapy). The decision you need to make is whether or not you want to try one treatment and see how she does. If you decide to give one dose and she tolerates the chemotherapy well then you keep going. Most big dogs handle the chemotherapy very well as we just don't treat them as aggressively as people. If you try one treatment and you're not happy with how she does then you can either adjust the drug or dose to Molly's needs or stop entirely.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,137

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    100% agree with above post.

    Good luck with Molly, you will be amazed at how fast she's back on her 3 feet



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2013
    Posts
    59

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    Molly wants to thank everyone for their support! She is doing so much better than expected. She is already able to run around with the other dogs, and although she is still figuring out how to squat and hold her balance to use the bathroom she is coping so well.

    We have a meeting with the specialist cancer vet next week. Its hard to imagine this vibrant dog has anything wrong with her!

    Thank you all for the encouragement, I know for her this was the right decision.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    10,925

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    More jingles! Go Molly!
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4,043

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    ~~~~JINGLES from FL~~~~~
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,551

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    Great news! Hang in there, Molly!
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2012
    Location
    Louisa County, Virginia
    Posts
    269

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    Great news! I hope continued reports from the vet are positive, any way it sounds like she is comfortable and happy to be back home with you and her "siblings" and that's terrific.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,551

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    How is Molly doing?
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2013
    Posts
    59

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    Very well thank you! I think the 4th leg must have just been an extra, she's getting around great and spirits are very high!

    I am finally starting to accept it, but then again I have already had 2 glasses of wine tonight!



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