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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2008
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    Close to Ocala,fl
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    832

    Default Stallion handling question

    Believe it or not posting for a friend...lol

    Friend is looking at a 5 yr old stallion he is worthy of being a breeding horse (i.e. bloodlines and confo wise). She is a exp horse person though never into breeding end mostly riding stuff.
    But.....the horse has had nothing done with him other then being halter broke and just everyday handling (turned in and out,feet trims) and was used to tease this past yr. He seemed pleasant but he is all guy and he knows it.

    I guess the question is has he past the point of being a riding/breeding horse? Due to his lack of any education. She wants to break him and show but keep him intact.
    Any thoughts?
    T.I.A



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2009
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    Default

    I don't think he's too far gone if she starts training now. Breeding wise, he is probably behind the eightball compared to his peers (this may depend on breed though) if you are looking to be competitive in that market.

    If it were me, personally, I would geld him, not because I'm anti breeding or anything, I just think it would be a lot less hassle. I'm sure there will be more posters here that will be more eloquent than I to help you out.
    I LOVE my Chickens!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2004
    Location
    Linden, CA
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    871

    Default

    A five year old is just mature, and there's no reason he can't be trained, shown, and bred. As the poster above points out, however, depending on how competitive the market is for stallions like him, he may be harder to market (eg, reining, where the big money is for 2-4 year olds).
    Quote Originally Posted by HuntrJumpr
    No matter what level of showing you're doing, you are required to have pants on.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
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    Wynnewood, Oklahoma
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    5,195

    Default

    Good appropriate handling will prevail regardless of the age. It's bad handling that will have a MAJOR impact . Good luck!
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2012
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    Barboursville, VA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Equine Reproduction View Post
    Good appropriate handling will prevail regardless of the age. It's bad handling that will have a MAJOR impact . Good luck!

    This is a very important comment and should not be ignored!

    I don't think that being a stallion means that he'll be a better competition or riding horse. The question that needs answering, is he worthy of being a breeding stallion? If so, why? and If not, then why keep him a stallion?

    Looking forward to the response from OP.
    Hyperion Stud, LLC.
    Europe's Finest, Made in America
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
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    California
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    1,853

    Default

    I bought an essentially untouched 6yo that had only pasture bred, he came around just fine.
    Making Your Ambitions a Reality at Secret Ambition Stables.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2008
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    Close to Ocala,fl
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    Default

    Hi
    I agree most stallions should be gelded However this horse truly has the breeding without question and they want to keep him in tact.. Without names his sire was mulit-world champ more then once died young and has been gone for like 14yrs (frozen seman was used) and the mare he is out of was also a champion in her line of showing and has produced two champion foals (fillies and one has been exported). This was kinda a chance breeding the mare was older and the seman was froze for 14 yrs and only one straw was used.And he is conformational great.

    But really just was concerned his lack of any education would be a issue at his age. I will say he has be well cared for in that he has always been well fed and feet done regular. I wouldn't say he has been mis-handled just nothing done past halter breaking. Is he young enough to be a riding horse and not just a breeding animal?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Location
    Western South Dakota
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    Default

    Well, not much training is far better than the wrong kind of training and 5 is plenty young enough. I really don't see the problem, IF he is a good minded, willing horse. And if he receives correct training now.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
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    Default

    He def can be trained to be a riding horse and not just a breeding animal. Has he been out as a normal horse or completely secluded? You may have issues when taking him out if that is the case. If he has a good brain you can work through that. He as been left to mature physcally so now he can work and breed for a living.
    *^*^*^
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2012
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    Barboursville, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by spook1 View Post
    Hi
    I agree most stallions should be gelded However this horse truly has the breeding without question and they want to keep him in tact.. Without names his sire was mulit-world champ more then once died young and has been gone for like 14yrs (frozen seman was used) and the mare he is out of was also a champion in her line of showing and has produced two champion foals (fillies and one has been exported). This was kinda a chance breeding the mare was older and the seman was froze for 14 yrs and only one straw was used.And he is conformational great.

    But really just was concerned his lack of any education would be a issue at his age. I will say he has be well cared for in that he has always been well fed and feet done regular. I wouldn't say he has been mis-handled just nothing done past halter breaking. Is he young enough to be a riding horse and not just a breeding animal?

    From your description, sounds like he maybe should stay a stallion for breeding purposes. )

    As for training to ride and such, have fun! Just don't ever turn your back on him. ;o)

    I adore stallions and everything about them. There is a greatness there that is all encompassing and when you put the great ones to the test, they will walk though fire for you. I also love the more instinctual part of them as often seen in the breeding shed. It's also true that many stallions lead lonely lives, and it's their handler or caretaker that they look for each day to give them the socialization they crave. So when you're going to put them into training remember that you must draw the line of respect early on, and you become the leader. Stallions can be very sensitive through training and breeding as well. Learn their quirks early on because they all have them.

    I could go on and on, but sometimes you just have to experience the relationship to get the full meaning. Enjoy the stallion and best of luck in your future endeavors.

    Cheers!
    Hyperion Stud, LLC.
    Europe's Finest, Made in America
    WWW.HYPERIONSTUD.com
    Standing Elite and Approved Stallions



  11. #11
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    Feb. 11, 2003
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    Lincoln, CA, USA
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    Learn their quirks early on because they all have them.
    Haha that is what most stallions think of their handlers
    www.immunallusa.com
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  12. #12
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    Jan. 27, 2012
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    Barboursville, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
    Haha that is what most stallions think of their handlers
    They can be very clever indeed!
    Hyperion Stud, LLC.
    Europe's Finest, Made in America
    WWW.HYPERIONSTUD.com
    Standing Elite and Approved Stallions



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2004
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    North Florida
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    Owning, training and showing a stallion is not for the unprepared nor faint of heart! Taking that stallion in to the show arena is a huge commitment..........there are so many uneducated mare owners out there!
    I specifically remember a day I was in a covered arena on Claim to Fame when he was younger and some yo-yo walks up to watch holding a mare who is literally squatting and peeing at the ingate. UGH!!!
    You have to be constantly aware of others, be sure you have stallion educated grooms, watch who they stable next to you, etc.
    It is a huge commitment, but I will admit was worth it.
    I bred Claim to Fame, showed him personally, and now handle him for collecting. Admittedly, he's a special boy but it's been a huge commitment and a lot of work. He lives 50 yards from my bedroom.
    Although I've been married a LOT of years and have two grown sons, this horse has certainly taught me about men, haha!
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    www.flyingcolorsfarm.comHome of pinto stallion Claim to Fame and his homozygous son, Counterclaim. Friend us on Facebook!https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fl...04678589573428


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