The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 88
  1. #21
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2009
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    340

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chardavej View Post
    Wow, uh, how about not hanging on their mouths?

    no kidding!! those poor horses. I couldn't watch more than a minute of it. that poor horse falling into the ditch. grrrrr
    these are not horsemen



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2000
    Location
    Concord, NH
    Posts
    4,999

    Default

    I've done this. Not that particular ditch, and I'm no expert having done it only a handful of times, but I have been there, in the muck, rain and weird stuff we wouldn't think of doing. These horses rock. They are well trained, sensible, and the reason the people are not galloping at these things is because THAT would be dangerous. Give the horse time to assess what he is being asked to do, and let them do it however they feel they can. What you don't see is the scouting part. Where, exactly, should we cross this thing, should we jump from a gallop or walk and jump from a standstill. Where can we safely get across - the staff do this, then the rest follow.

    I doubt this a training session, the people on foot are there because that's how they prefer to experience a day of hunting, and they are helpful for the riders.

    My experience was not for the faint of heart, but it really did show me that horses are capable of incredible things, and they love it. And the people involved respect the sport and all the animals involved, including the foxes.


    13 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,875

    Default

    The pack are harriers and I heard them in the background. There are always a lot of foot followers who thoroughly enjoy an encouraging whoop. The horses seem to be not bothered in the least by their duckings, and seem to take it all in stride - I'd not worry about them for a minute - the riders, maybe! These people and horses love this, or they would all be in a dressage arena. Look at their expressions as the horses finish their task - all calm, so, no, no harm here IMO.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


    7 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2009
    Posts
    596

    Default

    Some of those riders would have been better served with a submarine than a horse! I would dread continuing the hunt while drenched from head to toe.

    I suspect that there was probably a man with a long whip on the approach side to give a little bit of enthusiasm to those who wanted naught to do with the ditch. I remember watching a post-event schooling session at a water jump, with the course designer standing by with a bull whip. The horses weren't touched with the whip, as the firecracker pop was ample to restore their forward momentum.
    “Oh, you hate your job? Why didn't you say so? There's a support group for that. It's called EVERYBODY, and they meet at the bar.”
    Drew Carey



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    844

    Default

    The first time I hunted in Ireland, (on a half broke 4 year old) and we got to our first ditch, I truly believed that it was not possible for a horse to jump it. They did slow down to a walk since the banks were sloped, the ditches were about 5 feet deep and maybe 15 feet wide. I grabbed mane, closed my eyes, and hoped to heaven the horse wouldn't jump and I could just go back home. It was quite something. One poor lady on a fat little horse didn't quite have the 'scope' to make it, and found themselves at the bottom of two ditches during the course of the day. They pulled the horse out, shoved the lady back on, and the two of them galloped like blazes to catch up. They are crazy.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2011
    Posts
    648

    Default

    I can't see the video because youtube is blocked, but I am assuming it might be something from the Scarteen or similar big banks country, although if it were so, then you would see a lot of good horsemanship and very capable horses and riders. I can't tell, not being able to see the video, so I am only going on the comments.
    Re going slowly up to the banks instead of cantering like one poster has said above. The whole point is that you approach slowly, allowing the horse plenty of time to sum up the question. The good, experienced riders school their horses over these ditches riderless, before they ever expect them to tackle them with a rider on board.

    The horses know how to sum up these questions and take some time to settle themselves on the lip, get their balance and then launch themselves over. The rider's job is to not touch their mouths (hold mane or neck strap if necessary) and sit quietly and allow the horse to decide to work out the question.

    Anyone who has ever ridden a properly schooled hunt horse for that sort of country and I have been lucky enough to have had the chance once or twice will appreciate just how much schooling has gone in to creating these independent minded, clever ditch jumpers.

    I am surprised by the mention of standing martingales - that would be very unusual in Ireland - running martingales are the norm, standing ones would be quite restrictive.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2000
    Location
    Concord, NH
    Posts
    4,999

    Default

    I just re-watched - I see lots of running martingales, no standing ones.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    1,570

    Default

    The hunts that I have been on the 1st over would have continued on and not hung out watching - though there may have been more fun in sticking around and seeing who came off.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2011
    Posts
    648



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    9,040

    Default

    Sometimes horsemanship is about what your horse would willingly do for you, but you don't ask him to.


    11 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2011
    Posts
    648

    Default

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpV7...e_gdata_player

    A nice piece about the hunt with a very young looking Chris Ryan!!



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2008
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    3,270

    Default

    The riders in the scarteen clip seems much more balanced and skilled than the ones in the Killinick Harrier's. Different kind of riders base? It was actual a pleasure to watch the scarteen clip.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
    Location
    Rising Sun, MD
    Posts
    3,702

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    Sometimes horsemanship is about what your horse would willingly do for you, but you don't ask him to.
    Exactly- my horses will do pretty much anything I ask them to, but I gain that trust by not asking them to do stupid things that could get them (and me) really hurt like diving head first into a ditch.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,875

    Default

    We hunted with a branch of the Ryan family in Kenya, many years ago.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 1999
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    12,584

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CFFarm View Post
    I can hear my horse now. "You want me to go where and do what"?
    Even in her younger days, my girl would have had the brains to say "You go, I'll wait here."
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    33,619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bells View Post
    The hunts that I have been on the 1st over would have continued on and not hung out watching - though there may have been more fun in sticking around and seeing who came off.
    well, since the crossing was a bit slow, the advance group leaving could have proven disastrous for the back field.

    i'd say obviously they dogs weren't on scent at the time....
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Napoles View Post
    We trail ride over a ditch like this.. The horses walk down just like that and jump from where they are comfortable. Even Nanny does it and there is something about her being smaller that makes it easier for her to go in further and jump less. I have always thought it was pretty inviting, no? Never had a horse refuse it..
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    1,570

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    well, since the crossing was a bit slow, the advance group leaving could have proven disastrous for the back field.....
    I could see that but the hunting I did in the 80s (not sure it has changed since then) the front field would not have stuck around - and you are right I didn't hear any hounds on the tape either. Hence my thought they may have been training.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2006
    Posts
    2,896

    Default

    To exciting for my blood, but I did love hunting back in the day...The horses loved it and so did I. There is nothing quite like it.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,618

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HannahsMom7 View Post
    no kidding!! those poor horses. I couldn't watch more than a minute of it. that poor horse falling into the ditch. grrrrr
    these are not horsemen
    Yabbut, the horses don't looked fazed afterwards. The climb out and chill on the other side. "All in a day's work (even if the boss is drunk)," says the Irish hunt horse.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    5 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. NE Irish horse fun
    By horsetales in forum Eventing
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May. 11, 2012, 11:21 AM
  2. Irish bred IRISH horses
    By vineyridge in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Feb. 4, 2012, 12:51 PM
  3. irish fans - Stallion for irish mare
    By horsetales in forum Eventing
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: Sep. 19, 2011, 01:02 PM
  4. Replies: 8
    Last Post: Aug. 3, 2011, 07:54 PM
  5. Irish draught and Irish sporthorse breeders
    By incahoots in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 237
    Last Post: Jan. 22, 2009, 08:48 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •