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  1. #1
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    Default ASB Question

    Question about ASB conformation.

    Given that the necks are upward and backs are a bit low ( not lordosis), would they be more prone to back problems?



  2. #2
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    Not in my opinion they're not prone to them anymore than other breeds used in competition. I've owned around 60 ASB's or more, so I think I would have seen something by now.
    Susan N.

    Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.


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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by bludejavu View Post
    Not in my opinion they're not prone to them anymore than other breeds used in competition. I've owned around 60 ASB's or more, so I think I would have seen something by now.
    Same here...having been around Saddlebreds for more than 30 years, I've never known one with a back problem.



  4. #4
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    Nope. I have a gelding with a looooong neck and a little bit of a low back and he's never had any problems at all with his back. My other gelding on the other hand does have what I would call a sway back and he does get extra care so that he doesn't hurt. But I wouldn't say that ASB's are more prone to it than any other breed out there. Plus not all ASB's have a low back!
    http://www.youtube.com/user/NBChoice http://nbchoice.blogspot.com/
    The New Banner's Choice- 1994 ASB Mare
    Dennis The Menace Too- 1999 ASB Gelding
    Dreamacres Sublime- 2008 ASB Gelding



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trees4U View Post
    Question about ASB conformation.

    Given that the necks are upward and backs are a bit low ( not lordosis), would they be more prone to back problems?
    Their backs are not low, they are just not muscled like a dressage horse. Traditional Saddle Seat training doesn't really do much for the back, so you'll see lack of muscling across the back and loin.

    Plus, they tend to have a very high wither that is set further back than many breeds, which gives the illusion of a lower/dipped back. (This is one of the reasons why the saddles appear to be further back on their back - you can't put the saddle up on their wither/shoulder and keep them comfortable!).


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  6. #6
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    Thanks for the info



  7. #7
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    Yup, what Tiffany said.

    I have a couple of truly low backed horses (lordotic) in my barn and all we have to worry about is the saddle bridging the back. We use a low back pad that attaches under the saddle to prevent this.

    The rest of them are not low backed but the shoulder/neck conformation is exactly as Tiffany explained, very set back on many of the horses which gives them a great range of motion with their front legs. We have one who people drool over when we take him to open shows. They think he is a warmblood but his coloration give him away as a saddlebred (flaxen chestnut with a lot of chrome).

    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...type=3&theater
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  8. #8
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    Amrider, that is one GORGEOUS hunk o' horse!!
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!


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  9. #9
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    I also forgot to mention, usually ASBs are posed parked out. This can also give the appearance of a low/soft back.

    Here is my boy, a 14 year old 5 gaited Saddlebred. No low or soft back here!

    https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-p.../s640/Riot.jpg


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by oliverreed View Post
    Amrider, that is one GORGEOUS hunk o' horse!!
    Thank you! He is 20 this year and he just has so much personality. That photo was taken last summer. He shows in the ASB Hunter Country Pleasure division. We were jumping him but he now has some stifle arthritis now.
    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
    Bernard M. Baruch



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiffani B View Post
    I also forgot to mention, usually ASBs are posed parked out. This can also give the appearance of a low/soft back.

    Here is my boy, a 14 year old 5 gaited Saddlebred. No low or soft back here!

    https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-p.../s640/Riot.jpg

    LOL, his expression is priceless.....I hear Steve Martin in my head going "Excuuuuuse me!"
    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
    Bernard M. Baruch


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  12. #12
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    Thanks for posting the great pics!

    Can't get enough Saddlebred!


    Not to derail, but most back pain issues are rider and tack related where there is no bizarre injury to blame.

    -Not saying I'd try a low-backed horse on a 100 mile endurance ride, but 'looks low' is often more unsightly than unhealthy when there is genetics involved. And yes, it is a serious fault which should be avoided and not condoned or dismissed.


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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amwrider View Post
    LOL, his expression is priceless.....I hear Steve Martin in my head going "Excuuuuuse me!"
    He is wondering why I'm merely SHOWING him a peppermint...


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  14. #14
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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Trees4U View Post
    Question about ASB conformation.

    Given that the necks are upward and backs are a bit low ( not lordosis), would they be more prone to back problems?
    As others have shared here, it's not a "given" that their backs are conformed "a bit low". I'm curious about what brought you to that conclusion?
    The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off ~ Gloria Steinem



  15. #15
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    Maybe because many are,especially those that were never taught to use their back or abs.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunridge1 View Post
    Maybe because many are,especially those that were never taught to use their back or abs.
    Well that would presume that the OP has had personal contact with “many” ASB’s and found that they were all “a bit low ( not lordosis )” and I’d like to know if that is the case, or if the low back “given” is based on the stereotype of the breed (every breed has their swayback you know ). Knowing that would let us understand the basis for the OP’s question.
    The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off ~ Gloria Steinem


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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by GaiterGirl View Post
    Well that would presume that the OP has had personal contact with “many” ASB’s and found that they were all “a bit low ( not lordosis )” and I’d like to know if that is the case, or if the low back “given” is based on the stereotype of the breed (every breed has their swayback you know ). Knowing that would let us understand the basis for the OP’s question.
    "Many" are not low backed. "Many" are weak backed when compared to horses of other disciplines, and if they had been started and trained in those disciplines, would look very different. But regardless of how they are conformed (even those with lordosis) or trained, they generally do not exhibit back problems, at least not any more so than any other breed.


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  18. #18
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    This info is so basic most of y'all probably already know it, but I think it's a good article if you're interested in swaybacked horses, and it has some other links, too.

    http://www.equisearch.com/horses_car...ybacks_081205/
    "However complicated and remarkable the rest of his life was going to be, it was here now, come to claim him."- JoAnn Mapson



  19. #19
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    Rallycairn - that is a good comprehensive article with the exception of one detail - they state the gene had not been found; however, the genetic marker was identified in 2011. Here's an article about it:

    Swayback gene
    Last edited by bludejavu; Jan. 29, 2013 at 01:45 PM.
    Susan N.

    Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiffani B View Post
    "Many" are not low backed. "Many" are weak backed when compared to horses of other disciplines, and if they had been started and trained in those disciplines, would look very different. But regardless of how they are conformed (even those with lordosis) or trained, they generally do not exhibit back problems, at least not any more so than any other breed.
    I know that ^^. I was quoting sunridge1:
    Quote Originally Posted by sunridge1 View Post
    Maybe because many are,especially those that were never taught to use their back or abs.
    My question to the OP was to find out if their "given" (OP's word, not mine) assumptions were based on actual personal contact with ASBs, or on a breed stereotype.
    The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off ~ Gloria Steinem



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