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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    Do you think her jockey had to hold her while she was back there or that the distance she had behind the other horses helped her find her pace and just hang out until it was time to move up?
    I would guess it was probably the latter.



  2. #22
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    You had a horse stand in the gate for seconds after it opened and they didn't have you bring her back to school and break? That is crazy. I have had them make me bring a horse back because she moved her foot.



  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    You had a horse stand in the gate for seconds after it opened and they didn't have you bring her back to school and break? That is crazy. I have had them make me bring a horse back because she moved her foot.
    I tried to say nicely that my experience was different than yours but now that you've called my veracity into question, I feel compelled to point out that horses move their feet in the starting gate all the time. It's your experience that sounds crazy to me. Perhaps the difference in my case was that the stewards trusted my trainer to be able to fix the problem on his own without their intervention.


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  4. #24
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    Ok. Whether they make it official or not, the horse is going to have to go back to the gate before they let her run again. That surely we can both agree upon.



  5. #25
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    This thread reminds me of Silky Sullivan, who did not stay in the gate, but who spotted the field a lot of lengths in all his races. Sometimes he won and sometimes he lost. But he was always exciting to watch.


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  6. #26
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    She's a router. Likes the distance.
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous



  7. #27
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    From a pure physics point of view I am not sure I understand what LaurieB means. If the leaders started out with a blistering pace and slowed but the mare started out slow, it ultimately means that she had to make a blistering pace at the end. Regardless of who ran faster or slower at which part of the race, the mare ran, on average, faster than any of them otherwise she wouldn't have won.

    Fun race to watch.


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  8. #28
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    I saw what LaurieB saw. She had all the help in the world up front and was very lucky. As a 4YO - and from that barn - she has in all probability had tons of gate work. At that caliber of track/racing, with the top jocks and trainers, you don't worry about going on the starter's list.
    It's a uterus, not a clown car. - Sayyedati


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  9. #29
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    We had a colt who suddenly started flipping out in the gates, so he got schooled there a lot. Next time he raced, he did exactly what we'd been working on-standing quietly in the gates...while the field left him there. He was not put on the list.

    I can't recall where I read it, but there was a good explanation somewhere that the horse who wins the race isn't actually the horse running faster than the others, but the one that is slowing down the least, since horses run progressively slower the farther they run. So if the front runners run faster in the beginning to get where they are and the closer is galloping along conserving their energy, the front runners have used up their run (since a horse can only maintain top speed for about 3 furlongs I believe) and if the pace up front is fast enough to cause the front runners to slow down rapidly, then the closer won't have to increase his speed much to get ahead of the front runners.
    OTTB CONNECT
    FB group for all things related to non racing Thoroughbreds.. Click here to join ~~~> OTTB CONNECT


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  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeBreeze View Post

    I can't recall where I read it, but there was a good explanation somewhere that the horse who wins the race isn't actually the horse running faster than the others, but the one that is slowing down the least, since horses run progressively slower the farther they run. So if the front runners run faster in the beginning to get where they are and the closer is galloping along conserving their energy, the front runners have used up their run (since a horse can only maintain top speed for about 3 furlongs I believe) and if the pace up front is fast enough to cause the front runners to slow down rapidly, then the closer won't have to increase his speed much to get ahead of the front runners.
    Right. Think of it this way- each horse in the race is a teapot set to boil. Those teapots who were up front for the early stages were cranked up high; the teapot who lingered in the gate was set to a steady simmer. The teapots up front had boiled off all their water just as the lingering teapot got around to boiling.

    Those teapots may average similar water temps, but the pot boiling at the wire was the one who mattered.

    It was fun to watch, but we aren't seeing the next great American filly here.
    bar.ka think u al.l. susp.ect
    free bar.ka and tidy rabbit


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  11. #31
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    One of the greatest races I can remember was Secretariat's Kentucky Derby, in which he ran every quarter faster than the previous one. From the past performance section at www.secretariat.com:


    "But racing fans will always talk about Secretariat’s Kentucky Derby time. First, because his final time of 1:59 2/5 broke the track record for 1 1/4 miles in the world’s most important horse race. And second, because The Big Red Horse ran faster every quarter mile of the race, just building power like a locomotive and finishing like a jet.

    To come up with the horse’s ”fractional” times, experts began with the electronically-recorded times for the leader for each of the five quarter miles of the 1 1/4 miles Derby. Then, by figuring Secretariat’s racing position in relation to those times, they were able to extrapolate Secretariat’s own times for each quarter mile. They were something!

    Secretariat’s quarter mile fractions:

    0:25 1/5
    0:24
    0:23 4/5
    0:23 2/5
    0:23

    That’s a remarkable set of fractions because it is the opposite of how most horses and horse races are run. Usually, Thoroughbreds speed the fastest at the beginning of races and gradually slow as they tire. Even horses who save their big run for the stretch are likely not running faster than they were earlier, but are more likely passing tiring horses in an ever-slowing race."


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  12. #32
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    Market Quote made her second start today in the 2nd race at Santa Anita and went off as the favorite. She never threatened the leaders and finished 3rd, beaten by nearly 3 lengths.

    Winner of the race was Top Kisser, the filly who provided all the speed in MQ's first race and was then was caught and beaten half a length by MQ at the wire. Top Kisser broke her maiden next out, and this was the first try in allowance company for both fillies.



  13. #33
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    I really like Top Kisser. I'm not a fan of the closing running style, I like horses that are near the front with high cruising speeds. Silky Sullivan was crazy to watch!!!!
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  14. #34
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    Jun. 16, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaurieB View Post
    It was a nice debut, but it wasn't the second coming of Zenyatta.
    But But But We need another one. Tall dark mare, Starts her career later in life than the average and beyond that you are right it is her first race.

    Still she is so tall and dark she does remind me of Z.
    Save Schrodinger's Cat!!!



  15. #35
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    This is why I love Thoroughbred mares. Regardless of what was going on around her in that race with everybody else's speeds- she had heart.



  16. #36
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    My buddy's colt had a late break (not quite like that) and a strong close, but if you watched closely you could see the front runners run out of gas - he looked great blazing past them if you didn't see that so was everyone else. If they hung on he couldn't make it up.

    It's interesting that what makes a race interesting and fun to watch isn't necessarily the best tactics or form in terms of actually winning the purse.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  17. #37
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    If you subtract the time she stayed in the gate, was her time fast?



  18. #38
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    Reminds me of watching my one-eyed mare's first win. She stumbled (nearly face-planted at the gate) and came back to win it.
    http://www.nyra.com/aqueduct/videos/...0091204/9/pan/

    Still sends chills down my spine to watch it...doesn't matter if it was an impressive win or not. For the average person, they're fun to watch because of the "under dog" mentality, I think.

    I can also imagine being the owner, and what a roller coaster of emotions that kind of race would be.

    I bet Market Quote's next race is going to be interesting to watch. Hopefully.
    "Life ain't always beautiful, but it's a beautiful ride."



  19. #39
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    I had a horse that got slammed by two horses while "trying" to leave the starting gate and ended up pretty much on his head, how the rider stayed on still amazes me. He ended up 25 lengths behind the field going 3/4 of a mile. He got beat a nose and on inspection after the race he had run like that with a broken splint bone.



  20. #40
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    Jun. 30, 2011
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    This is my horse, Tom Archdeacon, in the Awad Stakes at Arlington in 2007:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9B2-NpuuyPQ



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