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  1. #21
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    Nov. 15, 2005
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    NY
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    Well at least DE's 990s are clear on who gets paid what.
    There are some other 'rescues' who's 990s show a lotta' money in, and a lotta' money out, but not where it goes.

    And for me, I would rather DE staff get paid than the killbuyer, or the neglectful owner.

    Man Fairfax, you sure do hold onto a grudge, don't ya'?
    How is Marsha Parkinson doing with the horses she had returned to her... have they all been registered? Are the young ones broke? Showing? Selling? And has she continued to breed?


    7 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22

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    As for Gentle Giants...we will have information on them and their dealings at a later date. Interesting you note they are now "going over" their accounting and filings...Those should have been accurate from day one as is demanded of other rescues
    I didn't say they are now "going over". I said they are getting GFAS accredited so it's another level of scrutiny on their finances. You should be pleased about that, I would think.
    The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
    Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
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    Jun. 19, 2011
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    Heads of non profits should be paid...absolutely...but they should not have their housing, food, travel expenses also paid for so their pay cheque is 100% clear.

    Good for you Shooten Star...you are from Maryland home of DEFHR and also Equirey and also Maryland Horse Council and also HSUS so I hope you make donations to ALL of them.

    Dancer....they do have the top HSUS accounting firm working for them. That is how they know how they can stretch their deductions and HIDE certain donations and expenses. That is why the IRS has become involved with so many rescue groups and HSUS.

    My other vcomplaint about these FUNDED rescues is: Due to the numbers of volunteers, they are able to look after horses and keep them in conditions that no normal horse owner would be able to afford. They then take these unrealistic standards i.e. water in a bucket must be clear of grass or mouth droppings and must be fresh AT ALL TIMES 24/7 that no one without hundreds of volunteerrs could achieve. They then try and change the laws so those without these free resources are unable to own horses.



  4. #24
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    Jun. 15, 2010
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    Why is $82k unreasonable for a nonprofit director? I am in the process of getting my MPA with a specialization in nonprofit management. We get to look at a lot of numbers and I'd say that $60-80k is pretty standard and only goes up from there for bigger nonprofits.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2011
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    Maryland
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraceLikeRain View Post
    Why is $82k unreasonable for a nonprofit director? I am in the process of getting my MPA with a specialization in nonprofit management. We get to look at a lot of numbers and I'd say that $60-80k is pretty standard and only goes up from there for bigger nonprofits.
    And you must also factor in where the rescues is located/based out of. DEFHR is outside of DC (in Mt. Airy, MD), one of the most expensive areas in the country to live. And let me tell you, $82k a year ain't nothing around here. In Montgomery County, MD, if a family's income is less than $70k a year they are eligible to receive monthly food donations from a food bank.
    Barn rat for life

    The Big Horse


    6 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Jun. 19, 2011
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    Yes, yes and yes Angela. ALL are registered. All have been halter trained at minimum and have had farrier work every 6-8 weeks for the past year. She has sold two horses at very successful prices (even in this economy)

    No breeding at the current time

    Amazing what could be done when the property was unblocked and sold. Instead of purchasing local hay (due to finances) she has resumed importing top quality hay . Gosh...I do hold a grudge when a PAID employee of HSUS was caught falsifying records as to the horses condition and when ALL male horses were illegally injected with hormone treatments known to cause sterility.

    (just two of the reasons the case had a successful outcome for Marsha..there were many many more...) And...it is not over until her lawsuit against those involved has been finalized.



  7. #27
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    Absolutely correct. So Kathleen has a home provided for her AS DOES HER DAUGHTER. All I have stated is they are able to have a grande lifestyle complete with free travel around the world at tax payer expense.



  8. #28
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by mp View Post
    What a cogent assessment.
    now I have to look that up......
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
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    Maryland USA
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    Fairfax, what do you think a non-profit's director should be paid?

    I've no idea where you are from but keep in mind that Howard County MD is an expensive place to live. Median household income is $106K which is double the national average.
    http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/24/24027.html
    vs
    http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/00000.html


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
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    Nov. 18, 2004
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    Fairfax is so shrill only dogs can hear him.

    An entire encyclopedia of non-events typed in all caps does not a crisis or scandal make, hon.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09



    16 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    Jun. 20, 2008
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    So what a 501(c)3 is not supposed to have salaried people? $82,000 is not a huge income for the DC Metro region; have you looked on Guidestar to see what other people in the equine industry's salaries might be? Look up how much say the United Way exec's get paid, A friend of mine works for a nonprofit and the head honcho there is well over a millionaire...I have no bone to pick with Days End and seems to me they do pretty good work over some of the other so called horse rescues. People don't seem to understand that just because a business is a nonprofit doesn't mean they sink all their money into the charity. WIHS is a nonprofit - check out the salaries some of their staff makes.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    4 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    9,078

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    I know 2 people who have volunteered there. Both are very critical of most horse rescues. Both say that Days End is a great rescue. I think I'll believe them.

    It must be "bash rescues week" on coth.

    And don't you ever wonder where Fairfax puts his/her donations for horses and people? I always wonder if these angry people actually help others (and animals) out.


    9 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
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    Nov. 15, 2005
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairfax View Post

    My other vcomplaint about these FUNDED rescues is: Due to the numbers of volunteers, they are able to look after horses and keep them in conditions that no normal horse owner would be able to afford. They then take these unrealistic standards i.e. water in a bucket must be clear of grass or mouth droppings and must be fresh AT ALL TIMES 24/7 that no one without hundreds of volunteerrs could achieve. They then try and change the laws so those without these free resources are unable to own horses.
    Seriously?
    Hundreds of volunteers? Hundreds? What is that, 5 people per horse?

    So what, rescues should not set the standard of how animals should be kept? Seriously? Cause the only thing worse than a horse living on a breeding farm where there's no dental or farrier care, no worming and no feed other than craptastic hay and 10% of the herd is in need of being put down is ... the horrors of requiring the horses have clean water buckets! Tsk! Tsk!

    Your exaggerations really don't help your 'case'.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
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    Jun. 19, 2011
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    Add up the number of rescues and hundreds of volunteers is probably an under assessment. I do not know what DEFHR has now but at one time they had over 50 and they also bragged that when they made the seizure call that they had inexcess of 50 volunteers come out.



  16. #36
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    My complaint about DEFHR is the way they ABUSE their position. They make sure Kathleen is on boards where she can insert HER standards and try and make them laws.

    Anyone who studied Parsio vs U. of Davis would be aware of that.

    The New Hampshire case evolved AFTER the owner had an article published in Modern Arabian stating that the HSUS and DEFHR sponsored seminar for police and animal control stepped over all boundaries when they stated that exaggerations could always be corrected by court time. The goals was to get the horses away from the breeders. He also stated numerous other examples as provided by DEFHR. Three weeks after that his property is raided and "unclean" water buckets was the excuse. The AC told his wife she had a copy of the article..and that a copy of her report would be forwarded to her husband. That never happened but when he finally got a copy from the police the AC strated she talked with this families vet about a "health condition she identified in one of his mares? The mare was treated for a respiratory condition and was under vets care which the AC was told about. She went on to stress in the report that she advised the "wife" that they MUST get the mare treated by a qualified vet.

    One horse had experienced a bruise to the sole of the hoof. Was under farrier care and in the report the AC out and out lied stating she had called the farrier and he supported her with her statement that the horse required care. The farrier had just been there the day before.

    These comments are going to be challenged in a court of law.

    How would you feel if your horses were seized and the person orchestrating it along with DEFHR sent photos of EACH horse back to the rescues they were farmed out to...telling them to downgrade the "weight scores" by 1 to 1.5.

    Or, how about if your horses were seized and before they "won" the case, they were injecting all of the males with hormones.

    These are but two items that were presented by the defense to the judge and the reason the outcome was determined.

    Out and out LIES used against breeders and owners is acceptable by these groups.

    THAT is why I refuse to support them. DEFHR has lied, injected horses and in fact, broken the law.

    Look at the circus that endured year after year of lies by HSUS and it turns out the HSUS witness was paid $147,000.00 TO LIE UNDER OATH.

    DEFHR has elevated itself with its contacts and politicians who support them. If DEFHR truly believes in the laws they are attempting to put in place...why not do it up front? Why try and make them "acceptable underground laws"?

    Many readers are concerned about the power these groups get. Do your own homework,,,,but google is not going to be your answer. Find individuals who can help you navigate throughout the legislativbe process to see what IS a law and what is acted upon as IF it were a law.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
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    Feb. 6, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairfax View Post
    My complaint about DEFHR is the way they ABUSE their position. They make sure Kathleen is on boards where she can insert HER standards and try and make them laws.

    Anyone who studied Parsio vs U. of Davis would be aware of that.
    So why not say that then provide something to back it up? Why go on for two pages about money and circuses and injections?

    What on earth is "Parsio vs U. of Davis"

    At this point I can't tell if you are somebody with a genuine grudge who is not very good at making a coherent argument when angry, or if you are just a random nutter.

    Given that I'm passingly familiar with DEFHR and they've always seemed like a well run rescue, and you are someone who randomly capitalizes words and strings random paragraphs together, I have guess nutter.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by tangledweb View Post
    What on earth is "Parsio vs U. of Davis"
    I have no idea. I believe he's referring to a court case somewhere. I thought maybe he meant "Paraiso vs. UC Davis" but I put a whole bunch of versions of that into google (plus the way Fairfax has it worded) and the closest I get is "Paraiso vs. United States" which is a Supreme Court case from 1907 and, as near as I can tell skimming has nothing to do with horse rescue. It does have something to do with due process.

    The only reason it came up for "UC Davis" is I believe a law professor from that school was commenting on the case. It's still too early in the morning for me to figure it out beyond that.

    I have no idea what DEFHR or New Hampshire have to do with it. Or why DEFHR would've been involved in a seizure case in New Hampshire as I think that is what Fairfax is talking about in the big paragraph up there.

    Maybe he will enlighten us.
    The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
    Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairfax View Post
    Add up the number of rescues and hundreds of volunteers is probably an under assessment. I do not know what DEFHR has now but at one time they had over 50 and they also bragged that when they made the seizure call that they had inexcess of 50 volunteers come out.
    So, it occurred to me while I was thinking about my experience volunteering at several non-profit organizations (to include a horse rescue, but also a museum that was local to me at the time, and an animal shelter)...

    Non-profits might have a huge list (hundreds, even) of "volunteers" on the books. That does not mean they've got "hundreds" out there every day...or even every week. Most places have people who come out a couple times, then maybe they end up never or rarely coming back, maybe they only show up for something that's a big deal (like when a rescue asks for extra help with a horse seizure), maybe they've got kids who are the ones who actually want to volunteer but they can only come out on school holidays or weekends here and there.

    In fact, most people can probably only volunteer on weekends, and most people don't want to show up (especially in winter when the weather is cold and ugly) early in the morning to help with the serious barn chores. Getting all the horses fed, cleaning all the stalls, etc. So they're more likely to show up around 10 on Saturday in the morning after a nice, leisurely breakfast, and a drive that might be anywhere from five minutes away to over an hour away. Or maybe on Sunday after church.

    Either way, by that point, the biggest chunk of necessary chores that have to be completed every single day is over with.

    So you've got the people who show up infrequently; the people who, because of work, may only be able to show up on weekends (or maybe a couple evenings a week)...and you're left with maybe a small, core group of volunteers who show up often, are there when they're needed most, and who come out not to just groom the ponies, but who are willing to do the un-fun stuff too.

    And even then, there are probably days when there's almost no volunteers on the farm. I mean, i don't know what it's like at DEFHR as I've never set foot on their farm, but I know it was like that at Gentle Giants when I volunteered there. That means it can be down to one or two people to care for a few dozen horses....not several hundred volunteers just sitting around waiting for a horse to drop some grass in the trough for them to clean up.

    Of course, that's just my perspective on how volunteering at a non-profit tends to end up, you may have a different experience.
    The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
    Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
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    Apr. 26, 2010
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    Should i give . like i have money .


    1 members found this post helpful.

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