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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2012
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    Barboursville, VA
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    424

    Default Why breeders don't always post sales prices on websites?

    So this subject has come up in other threads and so I wonder;

    Why don't many breeders post prices? I have my theory, but would like to hear from others.

    Cheers
    Hyperion Stud, LLC.
    Europe's Finest, Made in America
    WWW.HYPERIONSTUD.com
    Standing Elite and Approved Stallions



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2003
    Location
    MO
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    4,564

    Default

    Actually, I think most breeders DO post prices on their websites; at least that has been my observation. This topic has been discussed here several times and most people who have chimed in have said that if a price wasn't listed they wouldn't even inquire on the horse. I, personally, hate when an ad doesn't list the price, so I am one that does put prices on my website. I always assume that if the price isn't listed then I can't afford it Or perhaps the price is different depending upon who the buyer is, or to attract trainers and allow for a commission....
    Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm."
    --Winston Churchill
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    9 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3

    Default

    The only legitimate reason I can think of for not posting a horse's sale price on a website is if it is a young horse that is currently in training, in which case the price will increase with additional training. If that is the case, I would state in the ad that the horse's price will increase with training/show miles. Iwould hate to have someone see my young horse priced at $x and 6 months later question why the horse is now priced at $x +$y.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Mirabel, QC
    Posts
    2,656

    Default

    Prime Time, the answer to do that is to post a price range.

    At least, it gives a ballpark idea to the buyer whether the horse is within their budget or not at all.

    Budget is a recurring issue when buying horses, and I won't inquire on a horse without a price listed. But a price range won't deter me.
    www.EquusMagnificus.ca
    Breeding & Sales - Currently: Eventing & Derby prospects
    Facebook | YouTube |Twitter | LinkedIn


    6 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2008
    Posts
    1,639

    Default

    I too would like those who do not post prices to explain why. I'd really like to understand.
    Like most of the above respondents, I won't call on a horse where no price is posted, and assume it is not in my range. And posting price ranges is certainly helpful, as an alternative to a "price".


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2012
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Having been a buyer and seller, I have to agree that listing a price range is far more convenient to buyers and allows the seller the pricing flexibility. If, however, I really like the horse, I will contact the owner for the price and won't hesitate to tell them if the horse is out of my price range.

    Edited to add: Not listing a price is different from listing "Private Treaty". I have noticed that when sellers list "Private Treaty", it has always been a very high price....upward of the high 5 figures, usually into 6 so I never call on those anymore.
    Last edited by Mistysmom; Jan. 24, 2013 at 09:23 AM.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2003
    Location
    Charles Town, WV
    Posts
    6,637

    Default

    I price all my horses, and I also won't call on a "call for price" ad or a "private treaty" ad. Gives the impression that they are waaaaayyyyyyyyy out of my price range - even if they are not.
    Tranquility Farm - Proud breeder of Born in the USA Sport Horses, and Cob-sized Warmbloods
    Now apparently completely invisible!


    6 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,189

    Default

    I've only called once and sure enough, the horse was embarrassingly out of my price range so I don't bother any more.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Location
    Western South Dakota
    Posts
    2,400

    Default

    We list ours in a price range primarily because we do sell to trainers who then resell. The trainers appreciate it if isn't posted what the horse's exact price was.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2003
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    7,391

    Default

    We post prices but some trainers will not buy a horse that has had a price posted in the past because it causes issues for them down the road when they try to sell the horse for two or three times what they paid for it. Sometimes, it IS a legitimate mark up as training and showing is expensive and the value of the horse can climb significantly with that investment. Sometimes it is that there are a bunch of people who are getting a commission on the horse and those 5 to 20% commissions a piece start to add up fast. Again, some of that can be legitimate. If someone is doing the the work to help someone buy or sell a horse, than they should get paid for their time and effort. For example, say a horse was priced at $45,000 that was jumping 4' courses but had limited show miles. The horse was sent out on consignment and the trainer sold the horse for $60,000 2 months later. The new buyer found an old ad for the horse and was upset about the $15,000 mark-up, but the trainer had 2 months of expenses for the horse plus 4 weeks of horse showing ($7,500). Factor in a 15% commission for his services and the fact that the horse had more miles under his belt and that mark-up was not unreasonable at all, but it is tough getting buyers to see it that way.
    Silver Creek Farms - home of Apiro & Validation
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    4 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,479

    Default

    Personally, I tend to assume if there is no price listed then I cannot afford it. I have called before and dealt with someone who tried to feel out what I thought the horse was worth, before telling me what they were asking. Super annoying.

    I hadn't thought of the mark-up angle from the trainer's perspective, even though I know of a horse that went from 4 figures to high 6 figures in a year. But maybe they didn't catch it since the horse's name was changed each time.

    Can't you go change the sales add to remove the price after the horse is sold?
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

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    3 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2004
    Location
    Linden, CA
    Posts
    830

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
    Can't you go change the sales add to remove the price after the horse is sold?
    Sure, but the Internet is forever: see http://archive.org for examples.
    Quote Originally Posted by HuntrJumpr
    No matter what level of showing you're doing, you are required to have pants on.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2005
    Posts
    686

    Default

    My reason is that that on some sale sites, ads stay for a very long time.
    Obviously, I don't want to sell a three year old at the price he/she was listed as a foal.
    I don't have my own website, so updating isn't as convenient and easy to remember.
    As a buyer I don't have a problem with sellers not stating the price upfront, if I like the horse enough I get in touch and ask.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 20, 2006
    Location
    Seguin, TX
    Posts
    138

    Default sales prices on websites

    I do not post prices on my website because I have to pay for each and every update and that can add up. I am not making tons of money on my horses so I have to economize wherever I can. However, all my horses are listed with prices on Warmbloods for Sale - easy to adjust prices up ...or down. That way I never have conflicting information, either. Finally, sometimes I just need to find a home for a horse in a timely manner and so I will adjust downward.

    An e-mail is a simple way to query price if you don't want to call. And if you like a horse but don't ask...you just might miss out on a great deal.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2004
    Location
    The Redneck Riviera
    Posts
    3,827

    Default

    I don't list my prices on my website - not for any nefarious reason just simply because I have a web designer who, while she is great, she doesn't have time to update my website more than once or twice a year (with the occasional quick update in between). I have babies mostly - their price at birth is going to be different at 1 year old, and will be different again at 2 years old... my horses that are going under saddle that are for sale may have prices that change as well pending show results, training, etc.

    I list my prices on FB (my farm page) and on any sales sites that I list with. Frankly, I have never once had a problem with someone calling about my horses. Are there some potential buyers that have skipped over my horses? Probably. But I've been selling pretty well for the last couple of years - and for pretty close to asking price on every single horse. Also, my prices include any commissions for my trainer, or the person that has helped me with the sale, but NOT any other outside party - and I'm very up front about that. If the buyer's trainer wants a cut, they need to add that to my price.
    Emerald Acres standing the ATA Approved Stallion, Tatendrang. Visit us at our Facebook Farm Page as well!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    1,973

    Default

    As others have said, I assume no price means what my Mom always told me: If you have to ask, you can't afford it


    6 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 8, 2009
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    551

    Default

    I always list my prices, I do have a disclaimer up at the top of the page saying the prices are subject to change. I do have the advantage of updating my site anytime I need to. Currently I have a huge price difference between my horses right now because, the "more expensive" one's price is more of a "what would I part with her for?" price if that makes sense? I really don't want to sell her per say (at least not yet, but should anyone be interested it is posted). The other one I believe to be more then priced fair, and have no use for him in my program.

    I personally don't like the thought of asking for prices, because I feel if it is way out of my range, then I just wasted the sellers time and my own...but to each their own!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2006
    Location
    Sunbury, NC
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    1,789

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by showjumpers66 View Post
    We post prices but some trainers will not buy a horse that has had a price posted in the past because it causes issues for them down the road when they try to sell the horse for two or three times what they paid for it. Sometimes, it IS a legitimate mark up as training and showing is expensive and the value of the horse can climb significantly with that investment. Sometimes it is that there are a bunch of people who are getting a commission on the horse and those 5 to 20% commissions a piece start to add up fast. Again, some of that can be legitimate. If someone is doing the the work to help someone buy or sell a horse, than they should get paid for their time and effort. For example, say a horse was priced at $45,000 that was jumping 4' courses but had limited show miles. The horse was sent out on consignment and the trainer sold the horse for $60,000 2 months later. The new buyer found an old ad for the horse and was upset about the $15,000 mark-up, but the trainer had 2 months of expenses for the horse plus 4 weeks of horse showing ($7,500). Factor in a 15% commission for his services and the fact that the horse had more miles under his belt and that mark-up was not unreasonable at all, but it is tough getting buyers to see it that way.
    I always find it intriguing when people get upset if/when they find out the person they bought a horse from bought it for less. Clearly they thought the horse was worth the price they paid, or they would not have bought it - but suddenly now they feel it's not because of what someone else paid... like you said, take the risk, time and investment to make a horse up then and you can pay less I am pretty sure Walmart doesn't sell their goods for what they paid for them. lol

    But on topic - I also won't call on a horse that has no price, so we always list ours. It's harder when there are trainers or commissions involved but still, posting Private Treaty is definitely a turn off to most buyers with any kind of budget .
    Signature Sporthorses
    www.signaturesporthorses.com


    6 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2006
    Location
    Binghamton, New york
    Posts
    70

    Default

    I never post prices on my website but always have them posted on sales sites. I own several other businesses in my community and I would prefer if people didn't know the value of my horses.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2005
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eaglesnest2 View Post
    I never post prices on my website but always have them posted on sales sites. . . I would prefer if people didn't know the value of my horses.
    I do the same. I answer e-mail queries promptly.
    Martha Haley - NeverSayNever Farm
    2009 KWN-NA Breeder of the Year/Silver Level Breeder
    Royal Dutch Sporthorses of exceptional quality
    www.angelfire.com/ns2/our_horses/



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