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  1. #21
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    Nov. 15, 2006
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    I would xray and then see. I had a severely club footed TB and finally had to put him down at 12yo. But he was very, very bad. The vets were amazed he'd raced and been so good for me for so long. He was very sound up until about the last year and then I just couldn't keep him happy.
    This looks pretty mild to me, but only xrays would truly show.
    We're spending our money on horses and bourbon. The rest we're just wasting.
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  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2005
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    Unionville, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by atr View Post
    Not as a resale project.
    This. No way.
    Delaware Park Canter Volunteer
    http://www.canterusa.org/



  3. #23
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    Jun. 11, 2007
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    Minnesota
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cluck View Post
    I'd want x-rays to see if there has been remodeling of P3. If there was I would pass.
    Ditto. My boy has a "clubby" foot due to a long-ago fractured P3, that was refractured, and has since healed a little oddly. 90% of the time he's sound on that leg and about 10% of the time he isn't.

    So, as long as x-rays (I'd do both fronts, personally) look good and clean, I say go for it, pending the rest of the PPE.
    Proud owner of Gus & Gringo.
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  4. #24
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    Mar. 24, 2012
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    He's quite back at the knee on that leg.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
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    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot View Post
    He's quite back at the knee on that leg.
    Since he is standing with his cannon bone beyond the vertical, how can you tell?



  6. #26
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    Mar. 24, 2012
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    Since he is standing with his cannon bone beyond the vertical, how can you tell? .
    Yes, I can tell from that photo that he is back at the knee/calf kneed. The leg is not straight . Perhaps the term means something different to you?



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2005
    Location
    NC
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    I was also concerned with how the horse pictured looks back at the knee.

    My horse is clubfooted and *knock on wood* it hasn't caused any problems so far. But x rays taken last summer (took them for an injury not related to club foot) revealed sidebone that is probably a side effect of being club footed and the vets seemed pretty sure that the sidebone would eventually cause lameness Fyi the horse is only 10 and has had a moderate work load.

    Tripping has never been an issue and we trot and canter on winding, rooty, uneven trails fairly often.



  8. #28
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    Feb. 18, 2006
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    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot View Post
    Yes, I can tell from that photo that he is back at the knee/calf kneed.
    Amazing! Can you also tell from the photo that he appears buck kneed on the right front?
    The leg is not straight .
    Exactly! He is not standing squarely so any attempt at conformation analysis will necessarily be flawed.
    Perhaps the term means something different to you?
    Nope, means the same thing to me. Evidently, determining whether or not it is present is a different matter for you and me.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
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    Thumbs down

    Some conformation issues are fairly obvious regardless of whether horse is standing perfectly square or not.

    I have a horse that is back at the knee He is has never been bothered by it so far as I know but it is something to note in looking for possible weaknesses in a prospect, esp if combined with a club foot.

    You disagree with me about this horse. Fine. No need for sarcasm.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2008
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    148

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    I'd X-ray his feet to make sure it's a true club foot and there's nothing more serious going on internally in his feet. If the X-rays come back good and he's sound, then I'd go for it! I had a horse with a club foot who was still super sound at 14 ( I no longer have him, though, so don't know how he's doing now). IME it's not a big deal as long as you have a good farrier!



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
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    California
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    As others have been debating the consistency of a photo and without seeing the horse in person - what I understand is there are varying degrees of an actual club foot. I have a horse that has what would be a grade 1 club foot and I bought him; but saying that I am having issues with that foot being contracted and currently working on resolving the issue to the best of our (farrier/vet/owner) ability. I did see his xrays as well as my vet saw the xrays so it was a go for purchase based on those xrays.

    I know horses that are worse and have an actual dish and would not buy a horse with that conformation especially after looking at the xrays; and as stated not for a resale.

    But let me throw out there a guess and a question - the other hoof looks to be coon footed or maybe just long in the toe? Can anyone comment on that because one coon foot and one club probably would be a pass for many buyers. Also tied in at the back of the knee???

    And another thought/questions - with improper shoeing could a grade 1 club foot turn into a higher grade?
    Last edited by doublesstable; Jan. 25, 2013 at 05:23 PM.
    Train like you have never won and show like you have never lost!!!



  12. #32
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    Feb. 18, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot View Post
    Some conformation issues are fairly obvious regardless of whether horse is standing perfectly square or not.
    And some are not. For instance, the horse in question.......
    I have a horse that is back at the knee He is has never been bothered by it so far as I know.....
    What is your horse's job description? If you had your choice, which would you prefer, a buck kneed horse or a calf kneed horse? Why?
    .......but it is something to note in looking for possible weaknesses in a prospect, esp if combined with a club foot.
    Its something to note only if its present and not a figment of one's imagination.
    You disagree with me about this horse. Fine. No need for sarcasm.
    Je pense donc je suis and I am what I am and that's all that I am.......



  13. #33
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    Feb. 18, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by doublesstable View Post
    ...... what I understand is there are varying degrees of an actual club foot.
    Indeed. These links may offer some insights.
    http://www.nanric.com/Howtotreatclubfeet.asp
    http://www.nanric.com/grades_club_foot_syndrome.asp
    But let me throw out there a guess and a question - the other hoof looks to be coon footed or maybe just long in the toe? Can anyone comment on that because one coon foot and one club probably would be a pass for many buyers.
    What you see is often described as 'Hi-Lo Syndrome" or "Up-Down". It is found in most breeds, and is prevalent in some more than others. These horses are, generally speaking, not coon footed, a malady that is quite often seen in horses with DSLD/ESPA. With proper hoof care and the use of appropriate orthotics, the 'syndrome' can be managed. Please note my use of the term 'managed' rather than 'fixed, and depending on the severity of the club and the horse's job description and use, the condition may or may not affect the horse's performance. It is also relevant to note that in many/most but not all instances, the contra-lateral hind limbs will exhibit, often/usually to a lesser degree, the same hoof conformation. So in the case of the horse under discussion, I would be evaluating the right hind for evidence of clubbiness and the left hind for long toe and low heels. It is important to note that often, these conditions can be so well managed behind that they approach the level of 'fixed'. Again, don't delude yourself into believing that the front end can be fixed, sans perhaps, surgical intervention which is never a sure thing either.
    Also tied in at the back of the knee???
    Hard to tell from one inaccurately posed photo.
    And another thought/questions - with improper shoeing could a grade 1 club foot turn into a higher grade?
    Though "It Depends" is ever in play, IMO/IME, Yes.

    And, improper trimming has as much to do with it as does improper shoeing.........



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