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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2000
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    1,803

    Default Hay Soakers, a quick question for you

    My IR horse has to have soaked hay, and I know many barns have at least one or two little high maintenance darlings in the same boat . Currently we use a rather crap system of a muck bucket in a muck bucket cart, with a laundry basket full of hay in it, that we drain and them dump into his stall. I don't really love this method, because it's hard to get enough hay into the bucket, and because it's almost impossible to not get covered in icky wet hay when you dump it. I think I have come up with a solution that would be much easier and allow for much easier transport of the hay, and allow you to dump the hay into the stall without touching it (not going into details just in case by some fluke this is my million dollar idea ). Today I found someone who can possibly build such a thing, which was way beyond my skill level. Assuming you could purchase something like this, would you be interested or are you happy enough with your current system to not bother? I really don't have a clue on the cost we could manage yet (we're going to build an experimental one for my horse), but I would guess $50-100, and with regular use it would probably last several years but maybe not forever because of the water. I'd love any thoughts or wish list items from people who have to deal with this yuck job.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2007
    Location
    Zone IV/Area III
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    Could you fill a small hole hay net with hay, dunk that in the muck bucket, then hang that in the stall? At least you wouldn't have to get covered in wet hay...



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,932

    Default

    You are making it way too complicated and messy!

    I stuff small hole hay nets, stuff two in a big plastic garbage can, weight them, and then fill the can up with water. Pull one out when needed. I have all my hay nets on bucket straps, so I just clip the hay net up, no bothering with hoisting it up and tying it weirdly and all that jazz. Takes less time than throwing loose flakes.


    Of course, once I got my act together with my newly-aquired foundered/IR horse, I got all my hay tested and lucked out with one large batch that she can eat unsoaked. FANTASTIC, 'cause soaking hay BLOWS in the winter!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,932

    Default

    .
    Last edited by GoForAGallop; Jan. 21, 2013 at 10:31 PM. Reason: Double post



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Yeah it would depend on how much hay it would hold and how well it works in winter, if freezing would be an issue. When I soaked hay I used the small mesh nets and a muck tub.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2000
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    1,803

    Default

    Thanks for all of the suggestions - unfortunately a hay net is not an option for this horse because of eye issues (truly, he's a "special" one ).



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,932

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pookah View Post
    Thanks for all of the suggestions - unfortunately a hay net is not an option for this horse because of eye issues (truly, he's a "special" one ).
    I put mine at chest level....I assume you are concerned about debris? You can put them on the ground in muck tubs, too.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2006
    Posts
    695

    Default

    About a decade ago, when one of mine needed soaked hay, we used tupperware bins. Find two that fit together nicely, drill holes in the top one. Hay goes in the top tupperware, fill with water, when ready to fill pull out top tupperware bin (strains water out like a giant colander) and dump in stall. Toss more hay into top tupperware and stick back into the bottom tupperware for more soaking.

    Make sure your tupperware bins are not too big - the hay gets really heavy. Two smaller bins that can take 1/2 a bale each are more useful than a huge bin you cannot lift.

    Agreed that this can be a huge PITA, especially in the winter. Good luck.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2002
    Location
    The horse country of VA
    Posts
    3,332

    Default

    A small-hole hay net and muck bucket or trash can for soaking.

    As for the eye issue, a flymask and hanging the net low should alleviate that problem. A small-hole net should not pose any entanglement danger when hung low (many people actually put them on the ground as a "hay ball" type of feeder).
    Equus Keepus Brokus


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    Agree with Liberty, else I would dump the hay back out of the haynet, but then you're back where you started to some extent.

    I probably would not purchase a contraption for this due to the availability of tools already owned that get the job done. But that doesn't mean no one else would!

    A couple of thoughts on your contraption:

    1) If you can put together specs that use readily available materials, you might be able to make $$ just selling the plans.

    2) I would consider using materials like pvc (rated for cold weather--however that works?) rather than wood for any framing due to the water issue plus not wanting anything to leech out of the wood.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    12,746

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by reay6790 View Post
    Could you fill a small hole hay net with hay, dunk that in the muck bucket, then hang that in the stall? At least you wouldn't have to get covered in wet hay...
    That's what I do.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2007
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    811

    Default

    I have a regular muck bucket, and that fits about 3-4 flakes of hay. It gets weighed down with a cinder block and soaked. When it's done, I just dump it out (my muck pile is conveniently about 20' from the gate) and drag into the ponies dry lot/stall.

    To get all the water out, turn it upside down, and leave it like that for a few minutes. The wet hay has expanded enough to not just slide it when you turn it back over.

    I have tied a pice of twine to the handle, so I have an easy way to drag it PLUS, it gets clipped to the wall, so pony won't drag it into the middle of his stall at night.

    It the summer, it gets fed in hay nets, which is a little more annoying...but I am strong, and using more than one hay net isn't beneath me, haha.

    Idk if I would buy a contraption, since my father is a carpenter, and I could get him to build me one...
    "On the back of a horse I felt whole, complete, connected to that vital place in the center of me...and the chaos within me found balance."



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2004
    Location
    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
    Posts
    2,536

    Default

    Deep plastic wheelbarrow with 2 wheels in front to make it stable when heavy. Bungee cords and plastic garden lattice or chicken wire to hold it down. Easy to dump water, then wheel to feeding area and dump in a low rubber tub.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2011
    Posts
    1,395

    Default

    EZ hay feeder. Toss in tank. Rope hoist out, lash to fence, and let drip. Super easy to hang or dump. No mess, no fuss, no wet/frozen fingers. If the carabiner freezes a quick tap with any tool out of my back pocket suffices. No reason to spend $50-$100.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by D Taylor View Post
    EZ hay feeder. Toss in tank. Rope hoist out, lash to fence, and let drip. Super easy to hang or dump. No mess, no fuss, no wet/frozen fingers. If the carabiner freezes a quick tap with any tool out of my back pocket suffices. No reason to spend $50-$100.
    Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but I was super curious about your response here. When you say rope hoist out, do you literally have something overhead where you can hoist the hay out? How many flakes can you deal with at a time? I would love to see a picture of this setup.

    Our setup over the past 5 year has been a 30 gallon trough that I installed a drain in. The trough sits about 2' off the ground on a table I built for it out of 2x6 and 2x4 wood. We drain it weekly and have to add water about every 2-3 days. We soak the hay for just 15 seconds to get the mold out for our mare with RAO. I use 18" chemical gloves to dunk the hay and pick it up out of the trough. The chemical gloves can be used with cotton gloves underneath to keep your hands warm in the winter. They are a bit cumbersome to put over a jacket. In the winter I put a 150W submersible trough heater in the trough to keep the water from freezing. This has been successful down to -22F inside our barn that is not heated or insulated.

    In the horse's stalls I use large concrete mixing pans to put the hay in so that it does not make a wet mess in their stalls. Outside I just throw it on the ground, but to get it outside I use a muck bucket just for hay and a muck bucket cart to roll it up our hills here.

    The weight of the hay is starting to cause my joints to hurt over the years picking it up out of the trough myself. The hay is very heavy until the water drains out of it, and I need to find a better way to let it drain before I pick it up to carry it outside (or in the stalls).

    Your rope hoist idea with the ez feeder sounded like a great idea. If you have a picture of yourself that would be awesome. If not I am still curious how many flakes you can fit in the ez-feeder and be able to hoist it up and carry it outside. Thanks for sharing!



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