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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2012
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    9

    Default Horse shopping etiquette. How long would you wait?

    My horse is out of commission for a while and I'm in the market for a new addition to the family. I've spoken to my trainer about what I'm looking for and we've discussed her commission and all of that, and she said she'd start looking for something. I'm pretty sure I made it clear that I wanted to find something sooner rather than later, even if it was a lease or a greenie resale prospect. It's been a few weeks now, but we've yet to even discuss a potential option. As far as I can tell, she's not even begun to look. I don't have any off the wall requests IMHO (correct me if I'm wrong) Just something that's sound, reasonably safe, and can jump 2'6" halfway decently, *maybe* 3' down the road. I'm even pretty flexible on price/location and willing to transport the horse from a reasonable distance.

    I've been looking around myself and keep seeing ads coming and going that seem to fit my description, but I'm hesitant to start contacting people myself since I asked my trainer to act as agent. I feel like it would be disrespectful to her. How long would you expect to wait before starting to look at potentials? A couple things to consider: this is not a BNT, more of a MNT (if medium name trainers exist ) but she's well connected and should have plenty of resources for locating a horse. She's not terribly busy right now, at least where it concerns barn life. I've mentioned to her several times that I'm anxious to start looking, so she should be aware of my concerns.

    Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    11,672

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    Why not just ask your trainer what the status of horse shopping is?

    Print out some of the ads you found and take them to the barn and show her the ads and ask her if she thinks any of them are worth checking into.


    9 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
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    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
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    11,438

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    Time for a sit down with your trainer to revisit the issue. Make an appointment if necessary and simply ask her when she thinks she will have a few prospects for you to look at.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
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    Michigan
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    10,280

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    She's your agent, that means she is working for you. Talk to her about it and say you're ready to buy, you want to start seeing prospects. If she has some reason she's not looking, you need to be informed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2012
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    605

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    Last year, when I was looking to sell my horse and buy a new one, I used my trainer as my agent in both transactions. We were in daily contact, via emails, about horses I've seen for sale, and I took a very active role in the process. Partly because I'm a bit of a control freak and partly because it's MY money that she's spending. I don't know the price range you are looking at, but maybe your trainer is thinking you are not serious or anxious to get going, after all it is the "off season". I would demonstrate your enthusiasm by actively searching yourself.

    Plus, if it turns out that she wants you to follow-up on a horse that you found, maybe you can discuss a reduction in commission.
    ~ In the chaos of the showing, remember riding should be fun for all, including our 4-legged kids.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2000
    Location
    FL
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    285

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    Why don't you send those ads you like to your trainer? When I was shopping, I searched a lot myself online and then passed them to my trainer to look at and follow up on.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2011
    Posts
    347

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    I would just show your trainer what you found and ask if any of those seem worth pursuing to her. This will show her how motivated you are.

    I think this is preferable to you contacting the sellers yourself without your trainer's knowledge.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2012
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    227

    Default

    Ill never understand the thought process on this subject with some.

    A trainer is not god of the universe.. it's your money, your potential horse, your time. If you want to look at horses then look at horses. If you find one that you like then buy it. If she has no part then she gets no commission.

    Keep her updated and she can't have any problems.


    28 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
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    Longing to be where I once was.....
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    2,188

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    I would tell her you want to find a horse now--today. Maybe she wasn't clear on that. If she finds you one she gets a commission. If you find one yourself, go see it, try it, buy it and she gets zero.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
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    down the road from bar.ka
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    31,055

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    Quote Originally Posted by DreamBignRide View Post
    Ill never understand the thought process on this subject with some.

    A trainer is not god of the universe.. it's your money, your potential horse, your time. If you want to look at horses then look at horses. If you find one that you like then buy it. If she has no part then she gets no commission.
    But the the OP asked her trainer with whom she has an exsisting business relationship to look for her and that implies agency. Plus we don't know what is in her contract with the trainer regarding buying, selling and commissions.

    Best course is to just schedual a sit down meeting and ask how she is doing finding the horse and remind her how important it is to you to get going with one. She may have placed some calls or be working a few leads. Or not-thats what you need to learn.

    Also, remember the best ones are never in those ads, they go word of mouth.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by DreamBignRide View Post
    Ill never understand the thought process on this subject with some.

    A trainer is not god of the universe.. it's your money, your potential horse, your time. If you want to look at horses then look at horses. If you find one that you like then buy it. If she has no part then she gets no commission.

    Keep her updated and she can't have any problems.
    Different strokes for different folks.

    If you like to buy your horses on your own then fine. The OP wants her trainer to find her something appropriate. Nothing wrong with that either.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2006
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    Port Perry Ontario - formerly Prodomus
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    2,364

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    Quote Originally Posted by candyappy View Post
    I would tell her you want to find a horse now--today. Maybe she wasn't clear on that. If she finds you one she gets a commission. If you find one yourself, go see it, try it, buy it and she gets zero.
    This - and if you look at the horse and want her opinion I would make it clear that she is not getting commission because you found the horse but you would give her a fee for coming to look at the horse. I would pay a lesson fee plus travel time for a trainer to come to look at a horse I found.

    The last two years I have spent over 6 months looking for new horses for my sons. It can take a bit and I ended up buying them within 20 minutes of looking at them without vetting and without the coach - this after looking and trialing about 6-8 horses.

    When it is the right one it is the right one. Plus the reputation of the seller makes a difference. And I had a fairly decent budget


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2012
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    227

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    A trainer is going to be making money off of this horse that she buys even after the sale. They will also will be making money just for making the sale itself. If I'm paying someone who's going to be making money off me buying a horse I expect some recognition atleast once a week with an update.

    A few weeks and nothing at all? Doesn't cut it. She asked her to look for her, that doesn't mean she Is banned from looking herself


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2008
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    4,577

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    If you really want to get your trainer into gear, OP, print out an ad for something completely inappropriate.

    I say that in jest, but I would ask next time you see her if she's found anything interesting. You'll be able to decide where the conversation goes from there because the answer will let you know if she's been looking and not found anything she likes, hasn't been looking yet due to (insert excuse), or didn't know she should be looking immediately.
    "Aye God, Woodrow..."


    2 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2011
    Location
    PacNW, WA
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    284

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    If she was your realtor, you probably would have fired her by now.

    I would definitely be bringing in the ads I saw for her opinion. Her connections may find you a horse that isn't currently advertised for sale, but it's really her opinion that you want when making the purchase and that would still be happening even if you brought her the ad.

    And yes, tell the trainer you wanted a horse yesterday. Bringing her ads should help confirm that.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
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    Michigan
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    10,280

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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    Different strokes for different folks.

    If you like to buy your horses on your own then fine. The OP wants her trainer to find her something appropriate. Nothing wrong with that either.
    No, but that doesn't mean OP should sit quietly on her hands until her trainer deigns to look, or not pass along horses she would be interested in. The client is still the customer and the one who'll ultimately be writing the checks. She shouldn't be afraid to ask the trainer what she's waiting for or offer suggestions. It's HER money.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2012
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    605

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    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    No, but that doesn't mean OP should sit quietly on her hands until her trainer deigns to look, or not pass along horses she would be interested in. The client is still the customer and the one who'll ultimately be writing the checks. She shouldn't be afraid to ask the trainer what she's waiting for or offer suggestions. It's HER money.
    FWIW ... OP be careful here. As we all know, there are people in the horse world who do not always act rationally. I know a couple of trainers that would be greatly offended if you went out looking on your own after you talked them, regardless of how crappy of a job they were doing. Remember, almost no one is willing to admit they aren't doing a decent job. You don't want your trainer to get her knickers in a knot if you hope to continue riding with her. Like other people said, IMO the best option is to sit down and have a nice chat with her, letting her know you are anxious to get this moving.

    Good luck.
    ~ In the chaos of the showing, remember riding should be fun for all, including our 4-legged kids.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2006
    Posts
    3,650

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    I don't know..I think if she is not doing her job, or even keeping OP updated, OP can start looking. I would somehow make it clear to the trainer that you are doing so. You can say something like, "I know you're busy, so I'm taking it upon myself to start my horse search. I will be happy to pay your for your opinion if I find one that I like." Trainer can take this a couple ways. Yeah, she can be upset. But this may cause her to start searching. Or she can agree that, yes, she really is busy, and that this is a good idea. Or maybe she will say, "I'm sorry, this has slipped from my mind" or whatever. Anyway, good luck in your search.
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2008
    Posts
    257

    Default

    I'm sorry to hijack, but since I've never purchased a horse using a trainer as an agent, I have have a hypothetical question, and would love to hear some answers.

    If the OP ultimately purchases a horse that she alone found (including arranging all of the pre-purchase stuff) and received nothing more from her trainer than a "thumbs-up" to go ahead and buy him, does she still owe her trainer a commission on the sale? Or could she refuse to pay her trainer a commission because the trainer didn't totally fulfill her role as the OP's agent?

    I guess what I'm really asking is whether potential buyers and their trainers work out specific arrangements in regards to what services must be rendered in order for a commission to be earned.

    In my hypothetical case, could the OP's trainer say that because did nothing more than give the OP the green light to purchase that horse, that she, the trainer, had "earned" her commission?



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2013
    Posts
    125

    Default

    if you're seeing ads for horses you'd like to go out and see, i'd say email the links to her or print them off and show them to her. i'd imagine if you said something along the lines of 'i was browsing online and spotted this, what do you think about going and seeing it?' might kick her into gear a little as well as open a door for you to ask if she's seen anything without there being a reason for her to feel slighted.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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